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  1. #1
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    Second Ride....Fail

    Well I picked up a used Trek 800 last week. I hade it tuned up and then rode it for the first time yesterday for about 10 miles or so. At the end of the ride there was some clicking noise coming from the chain. It was not shifting smoothly.

    Today afterwork I look it over and then go to ride and get about 1/8 of a mile down the road and the chain breaks. The chain seemed to bind up and then instantly broke.

    Very frustrating for my second time out. I didn't want to get discouraged so I came home changed and went for a jog.

    Hopefully I can get it fixed and ready to ride on Wednesday. Hopefully it was just due to age and nothing else.

  2. #2
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    Sounds like whoever did the tune-up didn't spend enough time on it. If they didn't suggest that you needed a new chain, new cassette, etc. I'd be tempted to take it back to them and complain... You might also want to buy some basic tools and think about working on the bike yourself. With a couple of screwdrivers and some metric Allen wrenches, you'd be surprised at what you can do yourself. Shimano's component documentation is actually pretty good and freely available from their website. That might be all you'd need to get started...

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    Sounds like whoever did the tune-up didn't spend enough time on it. If they didn't suggest that you needed a new chain, new cassette, etc. I'd be tempted to take it back to them and complain... You might also want to buy some basic tools and think about working on the bike yourself. With a couple of screwdrivers and some metric Allen wrenches, you'd be surprised at what you can do yourself. Shimano's component documentation is actually pretty good and freely available from their website. That might be all you'd need to get started...
    I took it back and they fixed it for free. The quick link bent and that is where the chain failed.

  4. #4
    Tilting with windmills txvintage's Avatar
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    Excellent, just a minor glitch.

    It's a long journey. Like any journey, the first few steps are tentative and sometimes awkward.

    You're on your way.

  5. #5
    Senior Member 1bluetrek's Avatar
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    You may want to get in good with that shop, not everyone will toss in a free fix even if it's a minor deal.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gamecockcountry View Post
    Well I picked up a used Trek 800 last week. I hade it tuned up and then rode it for the first time yesterday for about 10 miles or so. At the end of the ride there was some clicking noise coming from the chain. It was not shifting smoothly.

    Today afterwork I look it over and then go to ride and get about 1/8 of a mile down the road and the chain breaks. The chain seemed to bind up and then instantly broke.
    Let's talk! I bought a used Trek 800 last month. What year is yours? My rear shifter doesn't work quite right yet, so I'm working on that.

    There isn't anything on this bike you can't learn to fix yourself either. most of the tools you need are very inexpensive (on this bike a set of wrenches or a pair of plyers, $10 worth of hex tools, and a hammer should be everything you need for basic work), and the only thing to fear is some dirt, and maybe having to buy some brake cable LOL.

    I've replaced my saddle, tires, tightened my brakes, and I'll be replacing the stem (What holds the handlebars onto the bike) tonight.

    Definitely don't get discouraged.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by gamecockcountry View Post
    I took it back and they fixed it for free. The quick link bent and that is where the chain failed.
    Did they explain why it bent? The last time I bent a link in a chain, it was because the derailleurs went out of adjustment. My own fault: I knew they needed to be tweaked, but went on a long ride anyway hammered up a few hills, and bent the link in the process.

    FWIW, I always carry the following in a Performance Bike TransIt 110 Wedge seat pack: Park CT-5 mini chain tool, spare chain link, two Pedro's tire levers, pedal wrench (think it's a Park RW1C or RW3C), a spare inner tube, a tube patch kit, and a multi-tool. If you buy a multi-tool that includes a chain tool (e.g. Crank Brothers Multi-17) then that's one less tool to carry. I also have a Topeak Road Morph pump attached to the frame. Seems like a lot of stuff, but it actually doesn't take up that much space and it gives you the ability to fix quite a few problems rather than being stranded or having to cut a ride short.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechKnowGN View Post
    Let's talk! I bought a used Trek 800 last month. What year is yours? My rear shifter doesn't work quite right yet, so I'm working on that.

    There isn't anything on this bike you can't learn to fix yourself either. most of the tools you need are very inexpensive (on this bike a set of wrenches or a pair of plyers, $10 worth of hex tools, and a hammer should be everything you need for basic work), and the only thing to fear is some dirt, and maybe having to buy some brake cable LOL.

    I've replaced my saddle, tires, tightened my brakes, and I'll be replacing the stem (What holds the handlebars onto the bike) tonight.

    Definitely don't get discouraged.
    It is black with blue lettering so based on a "vintage" trek site I think it is a 96 Trek 800 Sport. I am going to get the serial number off of it and see if I can get some more info on the year.

    I'm definately going to be investing in some basic tools and maybe some technical manuals. I am pretty mechanically inclined and this bike seems very simple. I don't want to have to go running to the shop for every minor issue.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    Did they explain why it bent? The last time I bent a link in a chain, it was because the derailleurs went out of adjustment. My own fault: I knew they needed to be tweaked, but went on a long ride anyway hammered up a few hills, and bent the link in the process.

    FWIW, I always carry the following in a Performance Bike TransIt 110 Wedge seat pack: Park CT-5 mini chain tool, spare chain link, two Pedro's tire levers, pedal wrench (think it's a Park RW1C or RW3C), a spare inner tube, a tube patch kit, and a multi-tool. If you buy a multi-tool that includes a chain tool (e.g. Crank Brothers Multi-17) then that's one less tool to carry. I also have a Topeak Road Morph pump attached to the frame. Seems like a lot of stuff, but it actually doesn't take up that much space and it gives you the ability to fix quite a few problems rather than being stranded or having to cut a ride short.
    He looked over it while I was there. He said he did not see any issues. Nothing was bent. He checked the derailleurs and made a few minor adjustments. He checked the chain to make sure it was fine and did not need to be replaced.

    After reading up on a few sites it may have been operator error. I don't think I was shifting properly and maybe that led to problems.

    Thanks for the list of tools and items. I'm going to start making a list of items that I need to pick up to make sure I am ready for common problems.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1bluetrek View Post
    You may want to get in good with that shop, not everyone will toss in a free fix even if it's a minor deal.
    I really like this shop. It is a small family owned shop with 2 locations. Everyone has been very friendly and helpful even though I didn't buy the bike from them. Although I probably will buy my next one from them if I upgrade.

    This may have been something they overlooked during the tune up or it could have been something I did wrong. Regardless, they took care of it while I waited at no cost.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gamecockcountry View Post
    It is black with blue lettering so based on a "vintage" trek site I think it is a 96 Trek 800 Sport. I am going to get the serial number off of it and see if I can get some more info on the year.

    I'm definately going to be investing in some basic tools and maybe some technical manuals. I am pretty mechanically inclined and this bike seems very simple. I don't want to have to go running to the shop for every minor issue.

    The vintage Trek site is the bomb. But rely on the serial #, not on the colors he listed. There are several examples where a bike comes in a color not listed in the catalog he used for the site. There are larger catalogs he has access to that show the production colors. He added Red to the 1993 listing after I found it wasn't listed.

    Does it have all the original components as far as you can tell? (shifters, deraileurs, etc) Im not some vintage bike crazy, I just am interested in these bikes for some reason. Probably cause its my first since I was a kid. We've had a few Trek 950's roll through the co-op as well. Thinking about snatching one of those at some point if I can't find a road bike I really like.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechKnowGN View Post
    Does it have all the original components as far as you can tell? (shifters, deraileurs, etc) Im not some vintage bike crazy, I just am interested in these bikes for some reason. Probably cause its my first since I was a kid. We've had a few Trek 950's roll through the co-op as well. Thinking about snatching one of those at some point if I can't find a road bike I really like.
    The shifters were replaced. It now has the rapid fire style instead of the grip twist style. The rest appears to be original.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by gamecockcountry View Post
    The shifters were replaced. It now has the rapid fire style instead of the grip twist style. The rest appears to be original.
    Nice. Mine came with rapid fires stock, so I got lucky there. Well Id be luckier if the rear worked, but that's what learning how to fix them is for i guess LOL

  14. #14
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    The park tool site has very good instructions on how to repair bikes.

    http://parktool.com/repair/

    That plus the Shimano docs, plus a few tools will allow you to fix most bike problems.

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