Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-18-08, 12:08 PM   #1
squirrell
On a mission for God
Thread Starter
 
squirrell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: VA
Bikes: Trek 1.2 WSD
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Stationary Bike Mountain Work-out

Ok, all, got a question. Cold weather has driven me to YMCA for my work-outs. I've been using this cool stationary bike they have (an Expresso I think it's called) that has a video screen mounted on it. YOu pick the program you want, and it shows a computer animation of people riding through the scenery and trip that you picked. YOu can set the pace rider, too.

Anyway, there's some good mountain routines on there and I've been doing there the last week or so. It's like you're riding up mountains, down, etc. The resistance automatically increases/decreases depending upon the onscreen situation. You also select the gearing you want too as you are riding.

At times, using the various mountain programs, I've actually found myself standing to pedal, just as if I was really taking on a incline. I've been burning up just as many calories as I would riding my Trek, too.

so--here's the question. I live in a VERY flat area but have chances several times a year to go into other parts of VA that are hilly/mountainous. I always find myself sucking when on this rides because I have no hill training.

Is this stationary bike program any help in hill training or am I wasting my time using the hill scenerios? It does feel like a good work-out but I'm wondering about the hills specifically. I know it's not realistic but do y'all think it might give me some help in hill training at all? I really want to be able to keep up on the hills next time I meet up with my group to ride.
squirrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 12:36 PM   #2
lil brown bat
Senior Member
 
lil brown bat's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Boston (sort of)
Bikes: 1 road, 1 Urban Assault Vehicle
Posts: 3,878
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's a helluva lot better than nothing, that's for sure. I'd say the best indicator if it's good hill training is what it's doing to your heart rate. Get a HRM and see what it says. And, btw, if it's the bike estimating your calories burned, be careful about accepting that as gospel -- unfortunately, exercise equipment is notorious for, ah...optimistic estimates of calories burned.
lil brown bat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 02:13 PM   #3
Ka_Jun
Who farted?
 
Ka_Jun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '06 K2 Zed 3.0, '09 Novara Buzz V
Posts: 1,287
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My guess is helping, but you have to huck the elliptical next to you to be sure.
Ka_Jun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 02:59 PM   #4
squirrell
On a mission for God
Thread Starter
 
squirrell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: VA
Bikes: Trek 1.2 WSD
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lil brown bat View Post
It's a helluva lot better than nothing, that's for sure. I'd say the best indicator if it's good hill training is what it's doing to your heart rate. Get a HRM and see what it says. And, btw, if it's the bike estimating your calories burned, be careful about accepting that as gospel -- unfortunately, exercise equipment is notorious for, ah...optimistic estimates of calories burned.
I've had a Polar F6 that I've been using for months now. When the program gets to the hilly parts on the screen, my HR can easily get up to max in no time. Today, I had to actually stop for a few and let it come down before continuing.
squirrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 03:03 PM   #5
lil brown bat
Senior Member
 
lil brown bat's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Boston (sort of)
Bikes: 1 road, 1 Urban Assault Vehicle
Posts: 3,878
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by squirrell View Post
I've had a Polar F6 that I've been using for months now. When the program gets to the hilly parts on the screen, my HR can easily get up to max in no time. Today, I had to actually stop for a few and let it come down before continuing.
I guess it depends on how you intend to hillclimb, then. If your hillclimbing is going to be of the stand-on-the-pedals-max-effort type, what you're doing helps; if you're aiming for the spin-in-low-gear type, maybe not as much. Will this exercise bike allow you to mix those modes -- have resistance high to approximate a hill, but change gears?
lil brown bat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 04:43 PM   #6
squirrell
On a mission for God
Thread Starter
 
squirrell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: VA
Bikes: Trek 1.2 WSD
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lil brown bat View Post
I guess it depends on how you intend to hillclimb, then. If your hillclimbing is going to be of the stand-on-the-pedals-max-effort type, what you're doing helps; if you're aiming for the spin-in-low-gear type, maybe not as much. Will this exercise bike allow you to mix those modes -- have resistance high to approximate a hill, but change gears?

Yeah, it has "gears" that you can change to approximate resistance on a real bike.
squirrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 09:08 PM   #7
lil brown bat
Senior Member
 
lil brown bat's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Boston (sort of)
Bikes: 1 road, 1 Urban Assault Vehicle
Posts: 3,878
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, there ya go. What I'd try is to set the resistance to approximate a hill, but then shift gears as necessary to maintain a proper cadence all the way up the "hill".
lil brown bat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 09:22 PM   #8
Missbumble 
I'm a Cyclist!
 
Missbumble's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Boca Raton
Bikes: Specialized Dolce Elite
Posts: 1,397
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hey Squirrel - I say increasing your HR on the staitonary Bike has to help!! It wil build your aerobic training if nothing else! Enjoy
Missbumble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-10, 04:57 PM   #9
Alathea
Mr. Frowny Man
 
Alathea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Nebraska
Bikes: 2009 Giant Yukon single speed;2014 Foam Green Surly CrossCheck
Posts: 459
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Expresso doenst account for weight/gender in their calorie calcs. You have to divide out distance by time to find your speed for the time, then take that can compare it to calorielab.com or something for the 'tier' you fall into for 'bicycle speed X'. You then take that calorie per 15 minuts (on calorielab) and divide it out by 60 to get cal/min, then multiply by time. It lets you add your weight to it, and although it still sets you into a range of say 16-19 MPH, its still closer than some calculators.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lil brown bat View Post
It's a helluva lot better than nothing, that's for sure. I'd say the best indicator if it's good hill training is what it's doing to your heart rate. Get a HRM and see what it says. And, btw, if it's the bike estimating your calories burned, be careful about accepting that as gospel -- unfortunately, exercise equipment is notorious for, ah...optimistic estimates of calories burned.
Alathea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-10, 05:08 PM   #10
Mr. Beanz
Banned.
 
Mr. Beanz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Upland Ca
Bikes: Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
Posts: 20,030
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alathea View Post
Expresso doenst account for weight/gender in their calorie calcs. You have to divide out distance by time to find your speed for the time, then take that can compare it to calorielab.com or something for the 'tier' you fall into for 'bicycle speed X'. You then take that calorie per 15 minuts (on calorielab) and divide it out by 60 to get cal/min, then multiply by time. It lets you add your weight to it, and although it still sets you into a range of say 16-19 MPH, its still closer than some calculators.
2 years ago, not sure if they can still hear ya!
Mr. Beanz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:27 AM.