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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 11-19-08, 04:49 PM   #1
Pacdaddy
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Need Clyde's Advice!

Okay, I'm about to break down and buy a bike. I've been wanting one for awhile. A buddy Clydesdale of mine has almost gone below the Clydesdale mark. I'm impressed. I HATE running. Did enough of that in the Marine Corps. Treadmills suck because you look at the same spot on the wall. I want to cycle. Probably not 150 miles per week. Maybe just 50 miles or so (at least to begin with). Anyway, I'm a BIG Clydesdale. No, I'm not talking 220 or 240 or 260. I'm 6'3" and weigh 280 lbs. Now, while 99% of the populous would NEVER be able to guess my weight the fact remains that I do weigh 280 lbs. I need a bike that will hold up. I am not even remotely thinking about mountain biking. The thought doesn't interest me at all. I'm interested only in road riding. I know I need a larger frame but I also need a durable one. I don't want to spend $1,500 on a bike. Can anyone suggest a mid level or entry level bike that would suit my needs and purpose?

Your input is greatly appreciated.
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Old 11-19-08, 04:56 PM   #2
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My son-in law, 260 lbs has this one.
You will need 36 spokes in your wheels.
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Old 11-19-08, 05:14 PM   #3
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Find a bike with a bottom bracket area made form large oversized tubing. My opinion is any material will do as long as it's big! The small tubes flex too much ending in damage. This Lemond was aluminum. New replacement frame is carbon and aluminum but still wimpy with small tubes.

If I were you, I'd look for big tubes like Cannondale. Avoid small diameter tubes.

12,000 miles then this after riding at 220-245


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Old 11-19-08, 05:29 PM   #4
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I got my Specialized Allez Elite this past summer when I was in the 290 range. It's held up fine, even with 24/28 spoke (stock) wheels. Haven't had any issues with spokes or out of true rims. I do like the size of the tubing on this bike. (In reference to what Mr. Beanz said.)

For the price you're wanting, you could find a very nice year or two old used bike. Too many people buy too large of bikes and then end up selling them at a loss. Keep your eyes open, and figure out your body's geometry so you'll be ready when the ride bike comes up.

Good luck!
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Old 11-19-08, 05:44 PM   #5
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trek 7200 $500.00
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Old 11-19-08, 06:31 PM   #6
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Surly Cross Check

Around 1K. Well worth it.
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Old 11-19-08, 06:47 PM   #7
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Well done with getting into cycling!
And welcome to the Clyde forum.
Your not THAT big....a lot of us started around 400 lbs.
The most important thing to look for is a higher spoke count (36 should do it).
Most frames will be ok. Just make sure you get one that fits. It'll go a long way to keeping you riding.
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Old 11-19-08, 07:09 PM   #8
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Look at the Surly Long Haul Trucker or the Surly Crosscheck. Both come in a 62cm frame and can be bought new for around nine-hunderd bucks. I have owned both of these bikes, and as a guy your size, they both suit me very well.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2055/...965ffb54_b.jpg
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Old 11-19-08, 08:36 PM   #9
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A fellow member just bought a bike that I tend to overlook as an option. Check out the Fuji road bike line up.

You will get the same component group as more expensive Trek and Specialized options for much much less. The frames aren't your primary concern so much as the wheels. A 36 spoke wheel will be your best bet.

Another good option, and looks cool too, are the entry level Felt bikes.
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Old 11-19-08, 11:31 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacdaddy View Post
Okay, I'm about to break down and buy a bike. I've been wanting one for awhile. A buddy Clydesdale of mine has almost gone below the Clydesdale mark. I'm impressed. I HATE running. Did enough of that in the Marine Corps. Treadmills suck because you look at the same spot on the wall. I want to cycle. Probably not 150 miles per week. Maybe just 50 miles or so (at least to begin with). Anyway, I'm a BIG Clydesdale. No, I'm not talking 220 or 240 or 260. I'm 6'3" and weigh 280 lbs. Now, while 99% of the populous would NEVER be able to guess my weight the fact remains that I do weigh 280 lbs. I need a bike that will hold up. I am not even remotely thinking about mountain biking. The thought doesn't interest me at all. I'm interested only in road riding. I know I need a larger frame but I also need a durable one. I don't want to spend $1,500 on a bike. Can anyone suggest a mid level or entry level bike that would suit my needs and purpose?

Your input is greatly appreciated.
I was about 275 when I started riding again. I started with a Trek 7200 (commuting 15miles a day to/from work) and made out fine.
I just upgraded to a Trek 7.3FX (230lbs now) and it's smooth as butta!
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Old 11-20-08, 07:14 AM   #11
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True road bike or performance hybrid?

As mentioned above 280lbs isn't all that big a clyde. Frames are pretty much frames and no, carbon forks and stays wont spontaneously combust on you. That in mind you can pretty much buy whatever and with a say a 1000 dollar budget you can get a solid entry level bike plus a few upgrades but I will get to that in a bit.

First, a good fit should be your top priority. Comfort on your bicycle will mean far more than what component package it comes with. Just getting into cycling you will be hard pressed to tell the difference between Sora, Tigara, 105 etc. Yes there is a difference but for a new rider they will be subtle at best.

Once you've found a good LBS you should test ride every bicycle in your price range. Ride it around the block a few times as a trip around the parking lot is not sufficient. Try to spend at least 20-30 minutes on each bike you test. Pick the one that is the most comfortable and screams "Ride me, ride me like that girl/guy/sheep (we don't discriminate here) you dreamed about in English class".

So now that you’re fitted and found the bike, you need to pick up a few essentials. Buy a seat pack, patch kit, multi-tool, tire levers, spare tube, presta to schrader adaptor doo-dad, frame pump, and most importantly a helmet. You can probably get all this for give or take 100-120 dollars. You might also need a floor pump unless your buddy has one you can borrow. If you neglect to buy these things (at least get the helmet to keep your melon safe(r)) then try not to ride any further than you would like to walk. Everyone does the walk of shame at some point, make sure you post your story when you do .

Now for my thoughts on upgrades:

Right out the door no upgrades are required. Ride your bike and follow the maintenance intervals recommended by your shop. When parts fail (everything wears out eventually) replace them with something a little more flashy/strong. The first thing that will be likely to fail is the bottom bracket, for some reason I have managed to kill 3 of them in my cycling career including turning one into a handful of metal shavings. Make sure when your bike goes in for maintenance that you specifically ask that the bottom bracket be tightened or overhauled as necessary.

Wheels, sorry but I don't buy into the "you need to buy new clyde approved wheels right out the door or else your doomed". Yes they fail eventually but a properly tentioned and true stock wheel will be more than sufficient for you (for now anyways). Ride the stock ones until either a rim cracks, constant spoke popping forces you to, or until you get your front tire caught in a storm grate and you taco that poor rim beyond repair. Hopefully by time this happens you will have saved up enough money to buy a set of Deep V's with Ultegra hubs.

And that should about cover it. Name brand of the bike is irrelevant so long as it comes from a good shop, get out and test ride em!
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Old 11-20-08, 09:53 AM   #12
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Ok, I will be the odd man out here and recommend a used bike. You said you aren't thinking about mountain biking, does that mean you don't want a mountain bike. If it is hilly where you are a mountain bike has lower gearing. If hilly in your area consider a triple or compact front crank.
But, those who read here regularly are probably tired of reading this, my recommendation is as follows.

1. Find a bike you like and see how it feels. I bought a bike from CL for $20.00 when I was commuting between to homes so I didn't have to transport a bike back and forth. It felt comfortable and rode great.
2. Spend as little as possible. Get a used bike.
3. Get a MTB (usually cheaper), you don't have to mountain bike ride on it.
4. Don't get caught up in components. As long as they feel smooth and function properly.
5. Once you ride a 1,000 miles total you will have a feel for the type of riding you want to do and what feels good to you on a bike.

By waiting to spend your money on a bike after riding the first 1,000 miles you will make a better decision. If you don't keep with cycling, your out your 20 - 50 dollars. You will have other expenses when you start such as gloves, shorts/bibs, etc. Items you can continue to use on your new bike. By waiting you will also have lost weight, gained fitness, and flexibility. All of these come into play on getting a bike that feels comfortable. What feels comfortable today may not after the first 1,000 miles.

So get a cheap bike as soon as possible and ride, ride, and ride ("ride lots"). During the first 1,000 miles don't worry about interval training, hill training. or anything else. Slow steady miles until you have built this base. Some say you need to ride the first 1,000 miles each year this way.

And if you decide to not follow THIS advice follow THIS advice. When buying a new bike, don't just consider the bike, consider the local bike shop (LBS). These are the one's you will have a relationship with when you go to buy new parts, upgrade, maintenance. Some like to buy from a local shop others will drive further to go to a shop that treats them better. Numerous posts here about LBSs and how they treat clydes. As Bautieri points out brands are similar within the same price point, so then it is a matter of how the LBS treats you and how comfortable you are dealing with them.
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Old 11-20-08, 10:32 AM   #13
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I second the advice for a used bike, especially if you know what you are looking for. If you don't, find someone who can advise you properly when you make the purchase.

That said, many folks, including me, don't know what they are looking for, or looking at, and a bike shop is the perfect place to go.
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Old 11-20-08, 11:29 AM   #14
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Dont feel bad about the weight. I "look" 180lb. if not 170lb. but weigh 207lb. and that weight difference can be VERY annoying. Even though I am in the bottom section of Clydesdales I felt that I was low enough to buy a normal bicycle and within two months of owning my bicycle the tires/rims showed that I needed new ones due to my size and so I did.
If you are serious about getting into cycling go to nearby cycling stores and take the time out of your day and just talk to them. Give them your height, weight, and size then ask for a bike geometry test so they can best suit you for a bicycle. If you are up front with them and honest about how much you are wanting to spend (DO NOT FALTER WITH THIS, EVEN THE FRIENDLIEST STORES ARE TRYING TO MAKE A BUCK) so they can best accomedate you for your needs and like it has been already said, a used bike isn't a bad option.
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Old 11-20-08, 12:22 PM   #15
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Okay, all. Don't go laughing at me but I just purchased this bike today. It fits me. It has fat tubing, it doesn't have "road" tires but they aren't mtn bike tires, either. I have nothing against mtn biking, I just am not interested in it. Anyway, the stealer changed the handle bars for me, put on a wider seat for my wider seat and is giving me 10% off on any accessories I want to buy. It's the biggest one they had and it happened to be what I needed in my size. I got a 'decent' entry level bike for $350. Of course, I only WISHED mine were silver or black or even the color of the one in the photo. Mine is purple but at least it's a dark purple and not lavender. LOL!

Okay -- honest opinions, please. My thinking was I was going to have to spend at least $200 for a bike to determine if I even LIKED riding. I believe I can sell this one for $200 should I tire of the sport, right?


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Old 11-20-08, 01:14 PM   #16
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So the bike fits, feels beefy enough to you, and didn't break the bank, looks like a nice ride to me no reason to be laughed at or feel ashamed. Get out and ride that bad boy!

Ok, thoughts on the bike:

It's perfectly fine. Enjoy your new hobby. You don't have to go throwing money at it. once you decide you like and want to stick with it I would buy a solid suspension corrected front fork and a solid seat post. Getting rid of the suspension will help your climbing and speed. Every time you push the pedals down the fork bobs just a little bit. When the fork bobs it is taking energy that could be used to propel you forward. Sounds silly but it's true. Same with the seat post, that energy could be transferred to the pedals. Now, don't go right off and make these adjustments. Get comfortable on your bike and ride, ride, ride! Worry about all the other details later.

Oh, you are also required to post us a picture of your new bike less you be cursed by the rim tape gods. Sorry, I don't make the rules
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Old 11-20-08, 02:40 PM   #17
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The front suspension has a lock out. Would that suffice at least for now? Sorry, I'm new to the cycling community, lingo and jargon. Now, if you wanted to talk golf or restoring a '68 Mustang or a '66 F250 or hunting I could add lots to the conversation! LOL!
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Old 11-20-08, 03:05 PM   #18
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Yes, if you can lock out the suspension, do so, this will take away the drain during pedalling. If you are looking to get somewhere as quickly as possible, then lock the fork out. Otherwise, if you are riding for pleasure and fitness, it will be a little more comfortable if you leave the suspension on. I would try taking the same ride with it locked out and open and decide what you like better.
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Old 11-20-08, 03:12 PM   #19
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Will do just that. Planning on a 10 mile or so ride this Sunday. I'll take a leisurely pace. I'm no Lance Armstrong. I'll give it a couple of miles with comfort suspension and a couple of miles with it locked out. I'll decide if I can even tell the difference in speed and climbing then.

Now, I'll have to get some spray paint for that purple. LOL!
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Old 11-20-08, 10:37 PM   #20
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Okay, all. Don't go laughing at me but I just purchased this bike today. It fits me. It has fat tubing, it doesn't have "road" tires but they aren't mtn bike tires, either. I have nothing against mtn biking, I just am not interested in it. Anyway, the stealer changed the handle bars for me, put on a wider seat for my wider seat and is giving me 10% off on any accessories I want to buy. It's the biggest one they had and it happened to be what I needed in my size. I got a 'decent' entry level bike for $350. Of course, I only WISHED mine were silver or black or even the color of the one in the photo. Mine is purple but at least it's a dark purple and not lavender. LOL!

Okay -- honest opinions, please. My thinking was I was going to have to spend at least $200 for a bike to determine if I even LIKED riding. I believe I can sell this one for $200 should I tire of the sport, right?
No worries about grief from us!
The best bike is the one you will ride.
Have fun and keep us posted on your progress!
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Old 11-20-08, 10:47 PM   #21
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Structural integrity aside, any bike you ride consistantly and actually fits you is worth the money.
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Old 11-20-08, 11:56 PM   #22
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Will do just that. Planning on a 10 mile or so ride this Sunday. I'll take a leisurely pace. I'm no Lance Armstrong. I'll give it a couple of miles with comfort suspension and a couple of miles with it locked out. I'll decide if I can even tell the difference in speed and climbing then.

Now, I'll have to get some spray paint for that purple. LOL!
Don't do a thing to it. It's a nice bike as it is. Just ride it, ride it, ride it, and tell us about the rides from time to time.
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Old 11-21-08, 06:21 AM   #23
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Don't butcher your paint job. If you ever decide to sell it or trade it in it will be worth more in stock condition. Kind of like how your 68 stang is worth more all original and matching numbers.

Besides, when you start wearing lycra like the rest of us noone is going to notice what color the bike is

Good luck on your ride, let us know how it goes.

Bau

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Old 11-21-08, 06:29 AM   #24
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Purple bikes are fast. Get some purple socks.
You did good getting a bike that fits.
Start out Very Slow.
You will get stronger each week.
Six months from now you will get a road bike.
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Old 11-21-08, 08:56 AM   #25
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Man, I lost a pound since yesterday and the bike has done nothing but stand in the livingroom overnight! Purple bikes must also be better at burning calories. I haven't even RIDDEN it yet! Look out 230! Here I come!
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