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  1. #1
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    Dual Suspension Bike for a Clyde?

    Is there a suitable dual suspension bike for a Clyde like myself that weighs in over 350 lbs?

    I would want to turn it into a daily commuter with smooth tires, and possibly move all of my ebike equipment over to it.

    So as you can see, my needs are not that demanding. i am just wondering if its possible to get more of floating ride to my daily commuter.

    Weight wouldn't an issue, because I'm already very heavy, and the ebike equipment has a way of making the pedalling easier.

    Can anyone speak from experience on this one?

    thanks

    Tyler

  2. #2
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeizeTech View Post
    Is there a suitable dual suspension bike for a Clyde like myself that weighs in over 350 lbs?

    I would want to turn it into a daily commuter with smooth tires, and possibly move all of my ebike equipment over to it.

    So as you can see, my needs are not that demanding. i am just wondering if its possible to get more of floating ride to my daily commuter.

    Weight wouldn't an issue, because I'm already very heavy, and the ebike equipment has a way of making the pedalling easier.

    Can anyone speak from experience on this one?

    thanks

    Tyler
    I have negative experience from my Trek Navigator. Once I removed the suspension seatpost and replaced it with a straight one, my rides improved. The same thing happened when I removed most of my suspension from my front fork. I was around 260 when I made these changes.

  3. #3
    Wookie Fred chewybrian's Avatar
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    I rode a dual suspension for a while. Only after switching to a hard tail did I realize how much energy I was losing on the dual. I would never recommend one unless you are doing competitive off road riding. But if you enjoy it, don't let us stop you. Most of the ones I tried would bottom out too easily when I was 330, so, you'll have to test drive.
    Campione Del Mondo Immaginario

  4. #4
    Senior Member lil brown bat's Avatar
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    Mmm yeah, I hate to be guilty of not answering the damn question, but SeizeTech, are you really sure you want that suspension? It's a PITA on a commute.
    You have the right to your own opinion. You don't have the right to your own facts.

  5. #5
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Dual suspension was designed to make descending better down big bumpy dirt hills. Otherwise, it's a big waste fo energy.

    Save the money you waste on the full suspension and put it towards a bike with better components or frame. Meaning a bike with LX components over a a bike with FS and Shimano low end shifters/hubs/derailleurs.

  6. #6
    Senior Member rugerben's Avatar
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    As a compromise, how about front suspension and a shock seat post?
    Something like the Giant Sedona?
    MOLON LABE

  7. #7
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    I have a FS MTB. I'd love to trade it off for a hardtail. The FS is quite bouncy when pedalling if you don't have a perfect pedal technique. It also burns up a lot of extra energy as some of your pedal energy gets sucked up in the rear shock. It's not efficient.
    -------

    Some sort of pithy irrelevant one-liner should go here.

  8. #8
    Rider
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    Another vote for non-suspension. My freighter has no suspension whatsoever front or rear, and I have no trouble riding on rough roads or through inclement weather without issue. The 'bent is FS, but it has a different drivetrain layout that doesn't eat energy.
    Current stable: Sun Atlas X-type (mine), Trek Navigator 3 (wife), two Sun Revolution cruisers (wife, daughter)

  9. #9
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    for commuting how about something like a giant cypress or sedona with ridgid fork. it will be fast and comfortable. only suspension on that bike is the seat post. which most people seem to hate anyway.

    you can always find these bikes on craigslist for a good price used.

  10. #10
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    I think wider, lower pressure, tires may be the best 'upgrade' for a comfortable ride. The suspension fork on my hardrock does take quite a bit of oomph out of my peddling if I'm really trying to book it, I feel it bouncing, though it's fine (with the pre-load dialed up) for just about everything else. Many folks will tell you the primary suspension system of the bicycle is the tires, so if you're using narrow, high pressure tires, you'll have much more of a "sports car, feel the bumps" ride than if you go wider and lower pressure. I'm ~275, with 2.0" tires at 70 PSI, it's pretty comfortable.

  11. #11
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    I wonder just how much power I would lose. I dont find myself pedaling hard for any reason. the motor does all the work for me, but I pedal anyways to get a bit of a workout. My ride is in excess of 1 hour each way, so even some light spinning is helping me out.

    I already have an oversized seat, and it works well for me. Even with a 1 3/4 hour ride I am not getting a sore butt.

    I wear hiking boot, yet I find my feet lack some support so I'm thinking of upgrading my pedals to the largest BMX pedals I can find. Mountain equiptment Coop sells some that I've been drooling over.

    My current bike is a hard tail with a front suspension by Schwinn. I suspect the front suspension is cheap because replacing it could cost as much as the bike. It seems adequate for damping the vibration on my wrists, however, I have to be careful when rolling into curbs and bumps. Some of them cause my front suspension to bottom out.

    My tires are 1.95 inch wide x 26in Diameter. I run their pressure fairly high to reduce rolling resistance. But as reccomended by the folks on this forum, I've cut it back so that the pressure does not exceed the tire ratings.

    I think you guys are correct, and I'm going to pass on the rear suspension idea. I think I'll be better off to learn how to ride light, instead of rolling into curbs with my butt on the seat.

    But, I was wondering......does anyone have a link to a spring post for my seat? I'm not sure if I've ever seen one before. Is it possible to get one with a really stiff spring?

  12. #12
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    You'd might want to look into 2.3 diameter tubeless tires and running those at a lower PSI than you could clinchers (since you don't have to worry about pinch flats with tubeless). That will give you better shock absorption, no more pinch flats, and great traction. Downside: expensive since it will require new wheels and tires.

  13. #13
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeizeTech View Post
    I think you guys are correct, and I'm going to pass on the rear suspension idea. I think I'll be better off to learn how to ride light, instead of rolling into curbs with my butt on the seat.

    But, I was wondering......does anyone have a link to a spring post for my seat? I'm not sure if I've ever seen one before. Is it possible to get one with a really stiff spring?
    You are off on the wrong track. Avoid a spring or suspension seatpost entirely. Every bounce will impair your pedal stroke.

  14. #14
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    I'd vote for ditching the e-bike assist as well. It kind of takes the lions share of exercise out of riding. Unless you have some sort of medical reason why you shouldn't be powering yourself then feel free to disregard.

    As stated above, go fully rigid or try to find a bike with a front lock out. If you buy a full suspension bike with front and rear lockouts you will be spending well north of 1k. Bouncy seat posts are generally a waste but if you insist then check out the thudbusters. http://www.thudbuster.com/

  15. #15
    karma is my higher power w00die's Avatar
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    +1 on either the Sedona or Cypress from Giant. I have a Sedona and have enjoyed riding it and losing weight while doing it. I have the Sedona DX which has adjustable front suspension and suspension seat post. I started riding it at 348 lbs and have had the fork and seat post both adjusted to the stiffest settings. I recently bought a Cypress off craigslist and the first thing I am doing is replacing the fork and seatpost with rigid ones.

    What size is your seat post? If the one I have would fit your bike I'd be happy to let you have it cheap. Let me know via PM.

    Best of luck.

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