Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-03-08, 06:39 PM   #1
youcoming
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Ontario Canada
Bikes: Opus Andante/Parleez5i/Burley Tosa Tandem
Posts: 2,131
New Bike Trek or Cannondale

I'm going to spoil myself next year by getting a new ride and am really torn between two specific bikes. The Trek Madone or the Cannondale Carbon1. Both right around the same price the Madone has Sram Force the Carbon1 has the old dura ace not the 7900. Dealer will switch out the crank on either one to a 53/39 as they both come with a compact which I feel I no longer require. I really like the looks of the Madone and love the Sram but I think the Mavics on the Carbon1 are better wheels.
http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...done/madone55/
http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/09/c...1D_9RSX1C.html

Last edited by youcoming; 12-03-08 at 06:46 PM.
youcoming is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-08, 07:06 PM   #2
B Piddy
Keep on, keepin on
 
B Piddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: La Crescent, MN
Bikes: IRO Jamie Roy Custom build, Giant Sedona, '06 Trek Madone 5.2
Posts: 228
Everyone has their own bicycle manufacturer preferences and asking a such a question always brings out biased opinins.

Simple solution: buy the one that feels best. If that doesn't make it easier, ask yourself which LBS is better?
About the wheels. A good LBS should be able to get the wheels you want when you're dropping that kind of change.

But damn.....that Red Madone is hot
B Piddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-08, 08:52 PM   #3
txvintage
Tilting with windmills
 
txvintage's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: North Texas 'Burbs
Bikes: Many
Posts: 4,832
I'm not the worlds biggest Trek fan, but that red and white just pops. Force is good stuff too.

If you have to have problems, this isn't a bad one to have, lol.
txvintage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-08, 08:57 PM   #4
youcoming
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Ontario Canada
Bikes: Opus Andante/Parleez5i/Burley Tosa Tandem
Posts: 2,131
I've never been what you would call a huge fan of Trek either but that Madone stirred something in me. I almost bought a Cannondale SuperSix this spring but decided to wait another year. Now Dale has went to himod carbon and out priced me. I like the Carbon1 but that Trek is hot.
youcoming is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-08, 09:15 PM   #5
dlester
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Marysville, WA
Bikes: Trek Portland/Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo/LeMond Versailles
Posts: 463
I can't say a thing about the Cannondale simply because I have a favorite LBS that treats me well and have been a Trek guy for a long time now, but I have seen that Madone locally and it is pretty sweet.

You will just have to ride both of them. When you are done, you can clean out your shorts and pick which one you liked the best.
dlester is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-08, 01:24 AM   #6
sstorkel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
Posts: 5,416
Personally, I wouldn't buy either of those bikes.

The Trek retails for $4620. For that kind of cash, you can do much better. My LBS is selling 2009 Specialized Roubaix Pro framesets for $1700. Do what I did and by an SRAM Force build kit from GVH bikes that includes Red shifters, Red brakes, Red crank, Red rear derailleur, and OG-1090R chain for $1250. Make reasonable selections for bars, stem, tape, seapost, tires, headset and pedals and the price goes to $1600. Or get a Dura-Ace 7800 gruppo for about the same price. Recycle the saddle from your current bike. Then snag a set of 1550g Easton EA90 SL wheels from eBay, using 25% cashback from live.com, for $400 net. That's a total of $3700 by my calculations.

That's one Hell of a bike and lots of cash left over to play around with: upgrade to 1400g EA90 SLX wheels for an additional $125, or get Reynolds Attack carbon fiber wheels for an additional $250. Snag a Cervelo RS frame for an additional $500 or a Pinarello F4:13 for another $750...
sstorkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-08, 06:40 AM   #7
bautieri
Downtown Spanky Brown
 
bautieri's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Camp Hill, Pennsyltucky
Bikes: 14 Motobecane Phantom Cross Pro 2000 Kona Lana'I
Posts: 2,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
Personally, I wouldn't buy either of those bikes.

The Trek retails for $4620. For that kind of cash, you can do much better. My LBS is selling 2009 Specialized Roubaix Pro framesets for $1700. Do what I did and by an SRAM Force build kit from GVH bikes that includes Red shifters, Red brakes, Red crank, Red rear derailleur, and OG-1090R chain for $1250. Make reasonable selections for bars, stem, tape, seapost, tires, headset and pedals and the price goes to $1600. Or get a Dura-Ace 7800 gruppo for about the same price. Recycle the saddle from your current bike. Then snag a set of 1550g Easton EA90 SL wheels from eBay, using 25% cashback from live.com, for $400 net. That's a total of $3700 by my calculations.

That's one Hell of a bike and lots of cash left over to play around with: upgrade to 1400g EA90 SLX wheels for an additional $125, or get Reynolds Attack carbon fiber wheels for an additional $250. Snag a Cervelo RS frame for an additional $500 or a Pinarello F4:13 for another $750...

Don't forget the additional expense of a work stand and any other tools that might be required for this build. It will still be cheaper but not an incredible amount. Plus if the OP were to buy from a shop he gets the peace of mind of warrenty service plus whatever freebies. Subby has to decide which is better for him, sweet a$s gruppo or service and support.

<drool>Roubiax decked out in red</drool>
bautieri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-08, 07:16 AM   #8
youcoming
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Ontario Canada
Bikes: Opus Andante/Parleez5i/Burley Tosa Tandem
Posts: 2,131
One thing I'm man enough to admit is my lack of bike repair or service build up. Fix a tractor trailer sure no problem fix a poorly adjusted derailer, don't think so. Not sure why but I look at bike gearing and my brain has a fart. Plus I'd need to buy all the tools plus pay for a coarse to learn how to use them. I would love to build it myself but I'm also happy taking my bike into the LBS I deal with. They fix it I ride away, no money changes hands and I keep coming back for all my other cycling needs. I do like the Pinarello though and the Dogma may very well be in my stable in another 4-5 years.
youcoming is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-08, 05:01 PM   #9
sstorkel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
Posts: 5,416
Quote:
Originally Posted by bautieri View Post
Don't forget the additional expense of a work stand and any other tools that might be required for this build.
There's really very little that's required to build a bike... both in terms of special tools and mechanical expertise. I've built 2-3 bikes over the last 12-18 months. I don't have any formal training as a bicycle mechanic, but managed to get by reading the Park Tool website, Sheldon Brown's site, and the directions that came with the components I purchased.

As far as special tools, I own a bottom bracket tool (Park BBT-9 in my case, $17), and a cassette lockring tool (Park FR-5 for me, $6). I bought a Park cable and housing cutter (CN-10, $27) but it doesn't work that well; I mostly use an old set of diagonal pliers (for cables) and an old Dremel tool with a cut-off wheel (for housing). A set of metric allen wrenches, a Philips screwdriver, and a pair of ViceGrip pliers round out the toolkit. Of course, there are additional special tools you can buy. Cutting a fork to length and installing a headset with press-in cups requires quite a few tools. I like being able to do everything myself, so I happen to own the tools, but they're a luxury: my local Performance Bike shop will do all of the work for $25 or $30, usually the same day I drop off the parts.

Life is certainly easier if you own a repair stand. I do all of my own maintenance, so I bought a nice one on sale a year ago for $100 or $120. Again, it's a bit of a luxury; it makes life easier, but there's nothing that really requires it. Get your shop to install the headset and cut your fork to length. Install the fork and stem, throw some wheels on the bike, and it's self supporting. From there you can easily install the rest of the components. When it comes time to tweak the derailleurs, you can rest the bike upside down on handlbars and saddle, or find a buddy to hold the rear tire off the ground while you twiddle the adjustment screws...
sstorkel is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:27 AM.