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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 12-10-08, 06:16 PM   #1
George
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Clipless pedals

I started playing around with different pedals and I just got done with the Time ATAC Alium and I think they are pretty hard to get out of. I was thinking about trying the Crank Bros Acid1 pedal to see if it was any easier. I have been using the M424 spd pedals. Maybe I'm just not use to the pedal, I don't know. Do any of you know anything about either of these pedals, thanks.
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Old 12-10-08, 07:55 PM   #2
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I'd keep the SPDs...proven design, simple and it works.
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Old 12-10-08, 07:59 PM   #3
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I hate Time ATAC pedals. They suck to get out of, as you mentioned, and they just don't feel "right" to me. I like Crank Brothers. I guess it depends on what you're doing with them.

I use Shimano Ultegra SL pedals or Look Keos for road, Crank Brothers Candy for my touring/commuter bike, and flat BMX-style pedals (Primo) for my mountain bikes. Can't stand having my feet confined while off road. I can bunny hop without them, I can pedal circles rather than squares without them, so I don't see the purpose off road.
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Old 12-10-08, 09:46 PM   #4
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Is there a whole lot of difference between SPD and SPD SL? I bought mountain bike SPD pedals for my new road bike because I didn't want different shoes for different bikes. I reserve the right to change my mind on what bike I want to ride up until the last second. Plus, I like to take the dog for a run on a trails then whip back into the house, drop the dog off and take the road bike out on the street.
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Old 12-10-08, 09:48 PM   #5
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I have Crank Bros eggbeaters on both of my bikes. They are easy in and out of after very little use.
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Old 12-10-08, 09:58 PM   #6
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Of the three the OP listed, the Shimano SPD would be the best to stick with IMO. Yes, there is some break in period when you first start using clipless pedals if you've never used toe clips and straps. You need to align the cleat under the balls of your feet. This may take a few rides and some adjustments of the cleat.
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Old 12-10-08, 11:12 PM   #7
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Thanks for the replies guys. I think I'm going to do like DieselDan says and just put the M424 back on.

Anybody want to buy a set of Time pedals.
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Old 12-11-08, 10:11 AM   #8
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Is there a whole lot of difference between SPD and SPD SL?
Yes, there is a huge difference between SPD and SPD-SL! Look at the cleats and you'll see that the mechanisms are completely different. The SPD-SL has a larger cleat, which the pundits will tell you translates to better stiffness, more power transfer, and less likelihood of developing "hot spots" around the cleat. Personally, I think that a good MTB pedal and high-quality MTB shoe are perfect for 98% of road riding.

Like epcolt, I prefer Crank Brothers pedals. I use Eggbeaters on both my road bike and my mountain/commuter bike. In comparison to the last SPD pedal I used (admittedly, 10 years ago), the Crank Brothers are: easier to clip into, easier to unclip, and allow more float (which keeps my knees happy).
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Old 12-11-08, 11:02 AM   #9
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Yes, there is a huge difference between SPD and SPD-SL! Look at the cleats and you'll see that the mechanisms are completely different. The SPD-SL has a larger cleat, which the pundits will tell you translates to better stiffness, more power transfer, and less likelihood of developing "hot spots" around the cleat. Personally, I think that a good MTB pedal and high-quality MTB shoe are perfect for 98% of road riding.

Like epcolt, I prefer Crank Brothers pedals. I use Eggbeaters on both my road bike and my mountain/commuter bike. In comparison to the last SPD pedal I used (admittedly, 10 years ago), the Crank Brothers are: easier to clip into, easier to unclip, and allow more float (which keeps my knees happy).


That's one of the reasons I thought about as far as float and hot spots,to get the Time spd pedals. I read a lot of good reports on them I was practicing a little while this morning and I'm getting better with them. Thanks again for all the replies.
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Old 12-13-08, 10:09 AM   #10
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I always figured the ATAC pedals were a little harder to break out of because the float combined with rough terrain could cause you to blow out of the pedal easier than SPD's or something else. I've been using the ATAC for about 10 years and road version for about 16. After getting used to the float I can't stand anything else.
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Old 12-13-08, 12:25 PM   #11
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I always figured the ATAC pedals were a little harder to break out of because the float combined with rough terrain could cause you to blow out of the pedal easier than SPD's or something else. I've been using the ATAC for about 10 years and road version for about 16. After getting used to the float I can't stand anything else.
Thanks for the reply. I decided to practice with the Time pedals a little more. Now that I'm getting use to them, I feel that they give my feet more support and I can get a little better power transfer, with them. I thought I would be giving up on them, but I ordered another pair for my other bike.

The Shimano pedals seem to hang up on me and sometimes I would pull out of them. Other times I couldn't get out of them. There is no doubt about it, if your clipped into the Time Pedal, you know it. Anyhow, I wanted to try something different and I'm glad I did. Thanks for all the replies everybody.
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Old 12-13-08, 01:34 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by George View Post
I started playing around with different pedals and I just got done with the Time ATAC Alium and I think they are pretty hard to get out of. I was thinking about trying the Crank Bros Acid1 pedal to see if it was any easier. I have been using the M424 spd pedals. Maybe I'm just not use to the pedal, I don't know. Do any of you know anything about either of these pedals, thanks.
I found the Aliums tough to clip out of as well. Combined with a Shimano SPD sandal I ended up with aches in my right knee after every ride. I've since returned to platforms for the winter and will try again with a real MTB style shoe in the spring. I am also very curious about the Acid pedals since the Aliums did offer enough of a platform to pedal on without being clipped in - very useful for traffic conditions.
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