Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34
  1. #1
    Senior Member BearsysRevenge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    53
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Bike for a super clyde?

    I've been trying on and off to lose weight for 6 years, with no success. I don't know how much I weigh, but I know it's 500+ lbs.
    I rode my brother's bike to get somewhere a few weeks ago and I fell back in love with biking, which I hadn't done since I was ~14, I'm 19 now.
    I definitely need a bike myself, but I was told by my uncle that I wouldn't be able to find a bike to hold me.
    I really want one, as I know its an exercise I will use every day. I have to get to school and stuff and I could feasibly bike there with no problem.
    I can't find a job because of my weight, my social activities have suffered, not to mention various health problems.

    Please help me out, I'm sick of how I am, and am ready to make changes.

    Money isn't too much of a problem, as my mother is getting an insurance settlement in a few months and she's willing to loan me the money to get what I need. If I need to buy parts separately and build one is fine.
    Last edited by BearsysRevenge; 12-18-08 at 11:14 AM.

  2. #2
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by BearsysRevenge View Post
    I've been trying on and off to lose weight for 6 years, with no success. I don't know how much I weigh, but I know it's 500+ lbs.
    I rode my brother's bike to get somewhere a few weeks ago and I fell back in love with biking, which I hadn't done since I was ~14, I'm 19 now.
    I definitely need a bike myself, but I was told by my uncle that I wouldn't be able to find a bike to hold me.
    I really want one, as I know its an exercise I will use every day. I have to get to school and stuff and I could feasibly bike there with no problem.
    I can't find a job because of my weight, my social activities have suffered, not to mention various health problems.

    Please help me out, I'm sick of how I am, and am ready to make changes.

    Money isn't too much of a problem, as my mother is getting an insurance settlement in a few months and she's willing to loan me the money to get what I need.
    Specialized Hardrock.

    Bdinger, front and center. We need you here! Give us some advice.

  3. #3
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Oh, and welcome to the forum. If you are near Philadelphia, PA, PM me and we can meet for a ride.

  4. #4
    Chubby super biker bdinger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,980
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome to the fourm! First, I'm going to tell you a story, not to lecture you or anything, but so you know it can be done - and what the results are. In June of 2005 I stepped on a scale and saw "567". At that time I was unhappy, I had a job that I went to but didn't do very well because I was always tired and couldn't seem to think. I had an apartment on the second floor because even though I wanted a third floor, I couldn't walk up the stairs. And I had a cat. Basically I was alone, and completely miserable. This is an excerpt from a journal post I made that day that I saw that number:

    So like, I don't know what to feel. I've run the gamut over the past three days, and today it's boiling over into a mixture of rage, depression, and self-loathing.

    But most of all, I think, determination. This isn't going to be one of the things to fail at. For, if I fail at this, I might as well just give up. I'm serious. I may as well just write off life, and count the days.


    Three years later I'm hanging out in the 340's (where I bounced below, then back into) and I've never been happier. I have a new job that I absolutely love with a company that I love working for. I am married to my best friend, whom I have two step-children and one new little guy (his name is Nick, he's what I call "the big cheese", and about the most amazing thing ever) and love immensely. And just last week we got an offer accepted on a beautiful home on a quiet cul-de-sac where our family can live and play outdoors. A bit over three years after that day, late this summer, I did the most grueling ride most fit people I know have been on - a 135 mile gravel ride in rural Nebraska, over hills, through heat and gravel. Did I mention I've never been happier?

    All of this was accomplished very simply: Sheer determination, constant vigilance on food intake, and a lot of work. A liquid diet got rid of the first 100 pounds, but everything after that was just intake + exercise + bullheaded determination. I say all this because I want you to know - I've been there, it's a bad place. Where I'm at today is much better, I'd never trade it for anything else.

    Now, on to the bike!

    Neil speaks the truth, the Specialized Hardrock is the route to take. At your weight, you are going to need to upgrade the rear wheel to something beefy, these days Specialized has a 32 spoke wheel and that just isn't enough. Mine came with a 36 spoke, and I started riding it like I stole it around 420-ish pounds, and it lasted several thousand miles before cracking. I just had mine re-laced to a Sun Mammoth rim, which seems to be ridiculously beefy. The Salsa Gordo is what I was going to buy - and you should probably look at - I just got a great deal on the Mammoth. A 36 spoke Gordo with a 36 spoke hub in the back should do you well, just be careful with it. If you have the money, go to a 40 spoke Gordo and a 40 spoke hub - ask a shop about what Hub to get.

    The only other change I would make is to swap the fork out with a rigid fork. Something like a Surly 1x1 steel fork would be the best, avoid aluminum or suspension forks. All the rest of the stock parts are beefy, and should be fine for you to start out with. WIth the wheel and fork, you are probably looking at around a $600 investment. Trust me, it's worth it.

    Hope this helps, and really, if I can provide any other info let me know.

  5. #5
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Camp Hill, Pennsyltucky
    My Bikes
    07 Raliegh Grand Sport 98ish Mongoose Manuever
    Posts
    2,099
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome to the forum Bearsys!

    First off, congratulations on making the decision to get your life back on track. At 19 you are far too young to give up on yourself. You can do this and your Uncle is so full of crap it's coming out his ears. Actually he probably doesn't know any better but still...

    Money is not an issue, still I think you would be best off on a progression to a bicycle. Personally I would recommend you start with some kind of trike, be it an inverted bent or something from the worksman line of heavy duty trikes.

    However, if you want to right to a bicycle that is entirely possible. For starters, forget any kind of suspension. If you opt for the Specialized Hardrock disc (go disc) immediately purchase a suspension corrected fork for it. My general advice with people is ride the stock wheels until they give out. You can try this if you want, and you may very well be able to get a couple hundred miles out of them, but be prepared to buy new wheels which will likely cost as much if not more than the original bike purchase. I'm thinking something along the lines of hand built wheels meant for tandem bikes, spoke count in the upper 40's front and rear. If funding still allows after these purchases upgrade your brakes to Avid Juicy 7's because (not to hurt your feelings) you need all the stopping power you can get. Once again, I'm not being mean, just observing physics.

    Once you get the bike I humbly recommend you never stand and pedal. Big guys are capable of creating a shiat ton of torque., it is going to really stress your bottom bracket (the part that connects your crank arms together) and your chain. Snapping a chain really sucks.

    First and foremost, you need to find a good bike shop that is willing to work with you. Don't be afraid to go in and don't be afraid to ask any questions that come to mind. If you feel mistreated take your money and go to another shop. Make and models of bicycles are very similar between the major manufacturers. The difference is mainly cosmetic so if you get rubbed the wrong way at a Specialized dealer don't be afraid of a Raleigh or a Trek. When you do buy the bike don't forget the essentials. You need a helmet. You need a flat repair kit, you need a frame pump, you need a floor pump, you don't need a seat pack but it sure would make your life easier and it would be a good idea to buy a multi-tool while you’re at it. If you neglect to do so, don't ride any further than you would like to walk. According to Murphy’s law of bicycling, you'll only get a flat with no means to repair it on the day you forget your cell phone on the kitchen table. It will never happen any other time.

    Don't get discouraged, you can and you will do this. Whenever you start to feel down you need to quiet the voice in your head that says "I can't do it". Feel free to PM me if you would like to discuss this privately. I also believe a poster named RollerDave was in a similar situation as you and he went with a recumbent trike. I don’t seem him around very much but it never hurts to shoot him a PM. Really nice guy too so don’t be afraid to ask.

    Also remember rule #6 which states not to take yourself so seriously, there are no other rules.

    Bau

  6. #6
    fishologist cohophysh's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    My Bikes
    Diamondback MTB; Leader 736R
    Posts
    1,200
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Great advice from a couple of our resident clydes. I want to reiterate what bau said about the bike shop you go to. Some don't care what you look like or how big you are and will treat you well. Others will have a very snobby attitude if you don't meet "their" definition of a cyclist. As Bau said, if they don't treat you right, take your money to the next shop or till you find one who will treat you right.
    Good luck and keep us posted.
    We cannot solve problems with the same level of consciousness that created them. A.E.

    1990 Diamond Back MTB
    2007 Leader 736R
    www.cohocyclist.blogspot.com
    http://www.loopd.com/members/cohocyclist/Default.aspx



  7. #7
    Tilting with windmills txvintage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    North Texas 'Burbs
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    4,832
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome Bearsey.

    You have the advice on the bike, and it's model that a lot of folks have ridden mondo miles on around here.

    There's a good chance there is a fellow forum member somewhere around you're area, it's part of our global domination plan and possible someone may know of a good shop. If you want to, let us know where you are and maybe we can be more than just moral support. If you're anywhere around me, I would be more than happy to help you in the shopping/selecting/yada yada yada. You get to name the bike all on your own though!

    It's fine to be sick of the situation, just don't be down on yourself. You are making a very wise decision for all the right reasons. You get a bonus discovery down the road in that riding is a great experience, you just happen to lose weight and get healthier doing it.

    Remember that early on it's going to be a challenge, with sore muscles, some mechanical frustrations, and probably a sore ***. That has nothing to do with how much you weigh. A Skinny Mini has the same issues when they first start out. If all you can ride is 1 or 2 miles, or even once around the block when you start, thats OK. It's further than you rode before and will get longer as you stick with it.

    I'll throw myself in there with bautieri and say PM me any time you want to talk or just shoot the bike breeze.

    Oh, and get some whitening tooth paste. You're gonna be grinning when the pedals start turning!

  8. #8
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    30 minutes North-West of Los Angeles.
    My Bikes
    2012 MotorHouse road bike. No. You can't get one.
    Posts
    3,571
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome, Bear, good luck with it all. The first step is the hardest.

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  9. #9
    Bikezilla Mazama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Flori-Duh
    My Bikes
    Co-Motion Mazama
    Posts
    881
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome, Bear. Beefing up the rear wheel is a must. 36 or 40 spoke. I'd like to recommend a Thomson seatpost as well. On my bike the seatpost was the first thing to fail.
    14,000 miles and rolling...

  10. #10
    Grammar Cop Condorita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Papa Smurf's Lair
    My Bikes
    in my sig line
    Posts
    1,543
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Welcome, Bear. I'd also recommend journaling. You can do it online in a blog, and that can be public, private, or semi-private. You can do it at home on your own computer and it'll be completely private. You can do it after every ride, in long hand. But make yourself responsible to yourself, accountable to yourself. Also, take measurements--chest, waist, thighs, calves. Typically you'll see your size falling before the scale moves much. In fact, sometimes that scale moves so slowly that the only change you see over a period of time is in how your clothes fit. Join a gym and cross train.
    That which does not kill me has made a massive tactical blunder.
    Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen. Louis L'Amour
    '07 Giant Cypress WSD "Radagast the Beige-and-Black" * '97 (?) Bianchi Premio "Orion" * '09 Trek Allant "The Black Pearl"

  11. #11
    Senior Member dbikingman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Spokane/Tri-Cities WA
    My Bikes
    mountain bike, road bike
    Posts
    1,325
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome Bear. I was going to suggest you search craigslist for a used Hardrock, but I couldnt' find one in the Buffalo area. I would suggest you read the book "Where did the fat go". It is written by the doctor who helps the people on the "Biggest Loser" TV show. It is fairly aggressive with having to workout, twice a day. At your age I don't think you will have any problem. (disclaimer: get a medical clearance from your doctor). As a side note if you want to challenge yourself, I saw a commercial for the BL TV show and they have a contestant who is 19 and weighs 452 starting on the show in January. Maybe you could compare your results to his.

    One thing you will have to do is monitor your food calories and I recommend fitday. Make sure you measue your food servings for awhile to get an idea of what an actual portion is.

    Good luck and keep us posted. We will share your success with you, help you through the tough times, and answer the questions you have. And when you get your bike, posting pictures of the bike is required if yoiu want to stay as a member in good standing in this herd

  12. #12
    Out
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Lalaland
    My Bikes
    two-wheelers
    Posts
    473
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm not sure where you live, but if it's near the ocean, buy the largest surfboard you can find...a twelve footer. Take a few lessons and surf. It'll change your life.

    And, yes, the bike is cool.
    I'm two-tired to ride today.

  13. #13
    Senior Member BearsysRevenge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    53
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the replies, all!

    Quote Originally Posted by bdinger View Post
    *snip for size*
    Thanks for the info, and I just spent the better part of 3 hours today reading nearly all of your blog. It's quite inspiring to know someone in similar situation was able to make some great changes

    I might only be able to pick up the bike at first and wait a while to buy the parts, it turns out. I should be ok riding on the stock bike for a few weeks to a month until I can replace everything, right?
    When you say $600 investment, do mean $600 total or $600 on top of the purchase price of the bike?

    Quote Originally Posted by bautieri View Post
    *snip for size*
    Disc means disc brakes as opposed to regular rubber stoppers, right?
    Should I get the Hardrock Disc Sport, Comp or Pro? What are the differences other than price? How will I know what's right for me?

    Sorry about all the questions... the most I know about purchasing a bike is "Which one on the rack at Wal-Mart looks the coolest"

    And thanks for the list of essentials, I honestly would have only gotten a helmet, and with my luck I'd be stranded somewhere with two flats and no way to get home.

    Quote Originally Posted by Condorita View Post
    *snip for size*
    Thanks, I saw bdinger's blog and decided to start my own fitness blog. I'll post a link once I get it started.

    Quote Originally Posted by dbikingman View Post
    *snip for size*
    I'm actually in the process of applying for the Biggest Loser Season 8, I just figured I might as well start now!, And thanks, I'll definitely check out that book.



    General question: I live in Buffalo, NY, and we get a metric crapton of snow, how difficult is it for a moderately good biker to go in snow/slush? I don't want to put off biking until late winter/early spring, but I also don't want to break myself and end up hating cycling by the time the weather is good.

  14. #14
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Camp Hill, Pennsyltucky
    My Bikes
    07 Raliegh Grand Sport 98ish Mongoose Manuever
    Posts
    2,099
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BearsysRevenge View Post
    Disc means disc brakes as opposed to regular rubber stoppers, right?
    Should I get the Hardrock Disc Sport, Comp or Pro? What are the differences other than price? How will I know what's right for me?

    Correct, disc means disc brakes just like you would find on a car only smaller.

    Well that's an easy one. It's a two step process that starts with "Does this feel right to me", meaning is it comfortable for me to sit on and reach all the controls easily. There are many work arounds for this such as pedal extenders, stem risers (raises the handlebar), different stems (changes how far forward or back the handle bars are), and adjusting the seat height which will probably be much higher than you are used to. When your foot is all the way down in the pedal stroke you want your knee to be almost locked out. You won't be able to touch the ground when sitting on your seat.

    The second step is sex appeal. Does the bike scream "ride me, ride me like that girl/guy/sheep (we don't discriminate here ) you dreamed about in English class". If it does and it's comfortable to you then buy it. A word of wisdom, don't buy a low end model thinking you will upgrade the componets as you go along. Parts and labor will cost you much more than buying the better bike right from the start. Ask me how I know this? Simple, I'll tell you how a Raleigh Mojave 2.0 bought for $260 turned into a $600 mojave 2.0 that was still not as good as a off the shelf $600 hard tail. In the long run, nothing is as expensive as a cheap or free bike.

    Ok, to the models you mentioned. A brief comparison by yours truly.

    Disc:
    Stock this bike comes with a really cruddy front shock. It is adjustable which is it's only redeeming feature. However when I wrote my first message to you I discussed changing it out for a rigid fork, they run about 20 dollars and install at my shop was 15 bucks (yours may vary) so for the extra 40 bucks give or take get the rigid fork right from the start. You might even be able to get it for free if you let them keep your old fork, if they don't let you keep your fork make sure you take it home, sell it on ebay. Someone will want it.

    Tektro brakes have mixed reviews. Some people like them, others despise them because they have a tendency to come out of alignment now and again. If you pay attention to them you should be fine. With a disc brake you just have to listen for the brake pads to be dragging against the rotor for no reason. Your multi-tool will have the torx driver to make these adjustments. I previously recommended juicy 7s which have a larger rotor, larger brake pads, and are hydraulic vs mechanical. One works with fluid the other relies on a cable to actuate it.

    Derailleur wise...wow. Altus rear and C-050 front...not good for a bike at this price. However, if you are not going to go off roading with it they should be ok. The front derailleur will likely need adjusted on a regular basis but if it works it works. The Altus rear works alright, it's a bit on the clunky side so you will feel and hear it when it changes gears. It's reassuring in a sense.

    Rims, single wall 32 spoke count. This is where I would give this bike a pass if you are going to ride it stock for awhile. Single wall rims are fairly weak and we know this is not an option.



    Disc Comp:
    I don't see a Disc Comp in the 2009 model line up...

    Sport Disc:
    Same crappy fork.

    Avid BB5 mechanical disc brakes, much better than the tektros on the previous model.

    X4/Altus setup. Ok, it's mixing components from Sram and Shimano in the drive train. This set up is considerably better than the previous model and unless you plan on replacing derailleur cables yourself then you probably wont notice the difference between the two provider mix.

    Replaceable chain rings, this is good.

    Better set of cogs

    32 spoke count double wall rims, much better and much stronger than the other single wall rims.

    If you can afford the extra $120 up front go with the Sport Disc. The extra goodies that come stock on it will cost you well over the initial expense of the purchase price. Also, that silver color is pretty sweet looking.

  15. #15
    Guest
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Grid Reference, SK
    My Bikes
    I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
    Posts
    3,769
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BearsysRevenge View Post

    I might only be able to pick up the bike at first and wait a while to buy the parts, it turns out. I should be ok riding on the stock bike for a few weeks to a month until I can replace everything, right?
    When you say $600 investment, do mean $600 total or $600 on top of the purchase price of the bike?

    Disc means disc brakes as opposed to regular rubber stoppers, right?
    Should I get the Hardrock Disc Sport, Comp or Pro? What are the differences other than price? How will I know what's right for me?

    General question: I live in Buffalo, NY, and we get a metric crapton of snow, how difficult is it for a moderately good biker to go in snow/slush? I don't want to put off biking until late winter/early spring, but I also don't want to break myself and end up hating cycling by the time the weather is good.
    Welcome!

    I am not an expert in health or weight management but I have a pretty thoroughly developed philosophy on bike maintenance/repairs/upgrading...

    Basically, buy whatever bike you like and feel comfortable on. The fit is by far the most important thing. Often, but not always, more expensive parts are more durable.

    Whatever bike you get, ride it whevevery you can. Any part that is not adequet for you will fail over time and THOSE are the parts that need upgrading. For instance, a heavy rider will almost definitely need to have a tougher rear wheel built - I think the reccomendation above to get a 40 or 48 spoke 'tandem' hub hand laced to a good rim is great advice. You can use the stock wheels... they will probably start popping spokes or cracking after not too long - then you need to upgrade. But things like shifters and derailleurs and brake levers are not really stressed by an extra big rider.

    Other things I think you should consider are a rigid fork (at 270 lbs I find even most 'adjustable' forks are almost useless), and some good sturdy BMX style platform pedals (but be careful not to hit your shins on them).

    Anyhoo, listen to the folks here.. they have experience and generally know what they are talking about!

    Good luck... and keep us posted!

    PS: Winter riding... Winter riding is cool if you are careful... avoid ice!!!!! and the best choice for tires if you are on wet snow or slush are narrower tires (like 1.5 - 1.9" wide) with a moderate tread... they will allow you to cut through the slush and hit the solid ground underneath. If you run wider tires like 2.2 or wider then you risk riding on top of the snow which is more difficult.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Montreal
    My Bikes
    Peugeot Hybrid, Minelli Hybrid
    Posts
    6,521
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My advice for winter riding is - dont in the first 5 days after a snowstorm. Apart from the difficulty in riding and controlling the bike in the snow, you dont want to deal with the crud that gets all over the bike. Also dont wear lots of clothes when riding in the winter - you should feel cold for the first few minutes because the exercise heats you very quickly. A spoke tensiometer is a very useful tool ($60)as wheels last a lot longer when the spokes are evenly tensioned and at the max recommended tension. Good luck.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    814
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Take a look at Kona's bike line--there are at least a couple of bikes with rigid steel forks and mechanical disc brakes. No stock bike will have adequate wheels for you. Don't worry about derailleur models as it doesn't cost very much to make derailleurs that work well--derailleurs that look too expensive for a given bike are a kind of "spec camouflage" that bike companies use to distract from cheapening down of wheels, cranks, etc., which are more expensive to make well.

  18. #18
    Senior Member cod.peace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    eastern Massachusetts
    My Bikes
    Rans V-Rex
    Posts
    999
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Peter White lists the Velocity Cliffhanger and Deep-V rims as being exceptionally strong for 26" wheels. He also guarantees against broken spokes and his shop is worth a call to consult with on wheels. http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/velocity.asp

    Budget ~$150-$200 for a rear wheel. You can always sell off the existing wheels if you don't get the LBS to change them out upfront. Welcome to the forum!
    old steel Specialized Hardrock

  19. #19
    Voice guy
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    137
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good luck on this journey, it's gonna be tough but I'm positive that you will make great progress. What area are you in? I'm sure someone here knows of a helpful shop in your area. Also, get a real number on your weight so you know where you are starting out and can get a real feel for the progress that is sure to come.

    Who knows, maybe you can be the next Jared (from Subway). I'm not joking. Everybody loves an underdog story and I say your situation has you a bit behind the 8 ball. Keeping a journal would be cool, whether you make it public or not is up to you. One last thing, go through the stories at this link:

    http://www.bicycling.com/newyou/

    Take care and much success.

  20. #20
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The NC Mountains
    My Bikes
    Too many to list, all vintage
    Posts
    19,459
    Mentioned
    57 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    +1 Look for a rigid steel mountain bike. There are plenty of good ones around used. Consider the first bike to be disposable. So I would go thrifty. Once you see your interest level, then look at upgrading (and at that point, you will have a lot better idea of what you want).

    Consider your first bike to be an entry point into this sport/activity, not your end point.

    You can find bikes like I describe on Craigs List for $100 +/-.

    But hey, I'm thrifty Bill, so I always look to used.
    Last edited by wrk101; 12-20-08 at 09:48 AM. Reason: addl comment

  21. #21
    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,278
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mazama View Post
    Welcome, Bear. Beefing up the rear wheel is a must. 36 or 40 spoke. I'd like to recommend a Thomson seatpost as well. On my bike the seatpost was the first thing to fail.
    I definitely agree with this.

  22. #22
    I'm Rad. vXhanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Florida
    My Bikes
    2008 Allez (Sold), 2009 Surly LHT (Sold), 2014 Motobecane Fantom Cross Pro
    Posts
    365
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welcome to the fourms, lots of great advice and support here!

    I started reading a book called "Hungry: Lessons leraned on the journey from fat to thin" by Allen Zadoff

    Lots of good information in there that may or may not apply to you.

    You've taken your first steps in the right direction, but don't get discouraged if the changes you are making aren't coming fast enough. Every drop of water will eventually fill up the bucket

    V

  23. #23
    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,278
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are SURE that you want to ride, and that you WILL ride, do NOT buy a cheap "beginner" bike. It's just a waste of money. Too many people buy a cheaper bike to "test the waters" and then get discouraged....because they're riding a crappy bike.

    My suggestion: The Surly Instigator. Get it built up with parts that will last. The wheels are obviously the main thing. Also, you will need a rigid fork, as already mentioned. Even with stiff springs (for coil forks), the fork will completely compress under you. I'm flirting with 300 and still have this problem. Cranks - I recommend something by Race Face. Profile used to make Cro-Mo MTB cranks, but I don't know if they still do. Shifters and derailleurs, I would stick with Deore or SRAM X-7 for cost savings, and the fact that they work just as well as their more expensive brothers. Do this, and you'll have a great bike that will last you for years.

    Here's the Surly Instigator: http://www.surlybikes.com/instigator.html

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Miami, FL
    My Bikes
    2009 Cannondale Caad9-7/2009 BMC SLX01/2011 Marin Nail Trail 29er
    Posts
    1,715
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How about something like the kona dr dew, has disc brakes ridgid forks right off the bat. It is aluminum but has 105 FD and Deore rear deaileur. 700 x 32 tires so should run pretty well, but i'm not sure of the spoke count.

    I'm not sure if it is in your price range but Kona's are supposed to be pretty durable.

    http://www.konaworld.com/09_drdew_u.cfm

  25. #25
    It's easy being green. recumelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    in the desert
    My Bikes
    Trek Beach Cruiser, Sun X-2 AX (bent)
    Posts
    932
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Get a recumbent with a big wide seat. It's alot nicer to the behind.

    ...I'm assuming your knees are better than mine. It seems like everyones' are.
    When I ride, the troubles just roll off my back.

    Originally Posted by Cody Broken :
    Every ride is a mission, a race, an adventure, a quest.
    Every bike is noble steed, a stalwart machine, a clever device, a stealthy speedster.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •