Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Aus
    Posts
    632
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    A Story of Three Bike Shops

    I feel the wind calling me. I feel very slow on my current mountain bike, and for a few reasons including wanting to see if the slowness was just me being an Athena or the bike, and just wanting to try riding a few bikes around I succumbed to the urge of visiting a few bike shops in the last few days to see what was around. But I had a varied experience. What I told them? Ė Basically that I was leaning towards a road bike, but was also considering cyclocross and flat bar road bikes for a compromise. I wanted to see my options.

    #1 Ė They arenít a pure bike store but rather whatís called an adventure store. So the bikes are a small part of what they sell. But they are a big store, so the range is similar to an LBS and the bikes of good quality. Being an adventure store they focus mostly on MTBs but do have some road bikes Ė Jamis and another local brand. They had also advertised 50% old stock, but I doubted there would be any left by the time I got there. Was talking to a very friendly salesman and was informed they donít have any of the in between bikes, only really MTBs and road bikes, but he was more than happy to let me take one of the road bikes for a spin. They only let you go around in the parking lot for now. Itís big and mostly empty but still very limited. They store also has an option of renting some bikes for a period of time (weeks perhaps) which may be good if considering an expensive purchase and want to make sure itís right. So I tried the bike he picked out, which was the only one on special and my size. ($2000 down to $1000). They did a quick check over of the bike to make sure it was shifting well and tires were up to pressure and so I put my sneakers on top of the SPD pedals and took it for a spin in the parking lot. Itís fast. I felt a bit stretched out even though I was staying on the hoods, but I hear this is usual when on a road bike for the first time. The bike also had a triple, which being soft, I would prefer. The price was very tempting but I donít want to commit to anything just yet.

    All and all a good experience, and certainly makes me take more seriously the local brand and not just the big multinationals. Staff great and most informative Ė easy to talk to and laid back. A lot more knowledgeable that I expected for a non LBS.

    #2 Ė The first LBS. The one I bought my current bike from and more of a roadie store. Have heard a lot of recommendations for them and have recently moved into a very nice shop. I talked to the salesman and told him my situation. Took one look at me and straight off he crossed the road bikes off the list for me. Said I would be too uncomfortable in the bent over road position. Considering I said I wanted to try out my options, he should have at least let me test ride one. He did show me over to the Kona Dew range which I had considered from my online research since they are one of the few flat bar road bikes/decent hybrids that are available with disc brakes - which I would prefer even if just for wet weather. There was a Dew Deluxe in my size so I took it for a short spin around some back streets after the salesmen rode it in a quick circle to make sure it was safe. I started off from a standing start up a medium size hill with some trepidation as on my existing bike I would normally be around the granny gear by the time I reached the top in that situation. So I was very surprised I stayed in the middle front chainring and that was with most of my attention on the pedals which a lot stickier that I am used to, so my feet were in the wrong position the whole time.

    After telling me the advantages of the mountain gearing and hence granny gears on the bike the salesmen asked me how I liked the granny gears on the hill. I told him I didnít need it and I almost laughed at the look on his face. I didnít tell him I surprised myself of course. All in all, I didnít feel like I was taken seriously because of my size and the way he didnít even consider the road bikes, but I really did like the bike I tried.

    #3 Ė Very small LBS and caters for the cheaper market. No real road bike stock to speak off. Has the Trek hybrid range which I was again steered to Ė because of the lack of road bikes there I wasnít too off put by this compared to the last shop. The salesman seemed less knowledgeable compared to the other stores but still knew enough. He ended up letting me take a 7.3 in my size out for a spin. He had said that the saddle height should be so that if you are sitting on it while stationary you should be able to stand on the ground on your tippy toes. I donít believe this and went along with it anyway and so the test ride the saddle was low. The tires werenít up to pressure and the shifting was horrible but after all this it was still faster than my existing bike. All in all and OK shop but they donít seem to take pride in their bikes.

    So, in conclusion. Iím not sure I should continue to look at road bikes, mostly due to the feeling on my test ride. I think I would like to try one out again sometime though and perhaps even renting one for a short period. If I had to buy a bike, I would much rather buy it from the first store even though they arenít a dedicated bike shop. If that shop had the Kona Dew range, I may own one right now.

    I also now know very much the feeling of not being taken seriously as a cyclist solely because of my size.

    I realize this is long and likely of no importance but to myself, but these is my experiences over the last few days and helps get my thoughts together.
    I want to live.

  2. #2
    Triathlon in my future??? flip18436572's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Southwest Iowa
    My Bikes
    Junk, that is why I am here. :-)
    Posts
    2,193
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I went through something similar and ended up with a small LBS after going to multiple other bike shops in the area. I purchased a Jamis road bike, as that is what I wanted, and that was the only LBS that really believed that is what I wanted and could afford. They all pushed me to comfort bikes or hybrids and that is not what I wanted and even thought that is what I said I wanted.

    Good luck with your purchase and go with what you want and not what they push you to!!!!

    Just my opinion.
    2007 Jamis Ventura Comp
    2006 Jamis Explorer 2.0
    2000 Specialized Hardrock (bought used)
    Swim, Bike, Run and sounds like fun

  3. #3
    Decrepit Member Abacus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    My Bikes
    2003 Trek 520, 1996 Trek 370, 1996 Bianchi Osprey, too many others.
    Posts
    309
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Have you thought of putting tourers on your list? Something like a Fuji Touring gives you most of the benefits of a road bike with a bit more comfort and utalitarian features like rack mounts.

  4. #4
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Camp Hill, Pennsyltucky
    My Bikes
    07 Raliegh Grand Sport 98ish Mongoose Manuever
    Posts
    2,099
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I remember my first ride on my current road bike when I was switching over from my mountain bike. Like you mentioned, it was twitchy, I felt wobbly and I wasn't all that sure I liked it. After a couple rides it will become second nature and you may even find a road bike to me more comfortable than your mountain bike.

    What I am getting at is that if you want a road bike, buy a road bike. Don't buy a hybrid or a cross as a compromise, both are great bikes but if you compromise you will never be truly happy with your purchase and all you end up doing is wasting your money. Get what you want and ride!
    Last edited by bautieri; 01-16-09 at 06:52 AM.

  5. #5
    don't try this at home. rm -rf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    N. KY
    Posts
    2,588
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Three bike stores let me test ride for as long as I wanted. I was gone for at least an hour. Riding around a parking lot won't tell you anything useful.

    Your store also should have had plastic adapters to make a flat pedal out of the SPD if you didn't have clipless shoes.

    Different bike brands can have very different sizing, so try some more bikes before you decide. They can swap out the stem for a shorter reach one, too.

  6. #6
    Tilting with windmills txvintage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    North Texas 'Burbs
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    4,832
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Your adventure store sounds like a chain we have here called REI, or a couple of other ones. If they have been around for awhile and offer service after teh purchase, I wouldn't hesitate to buy from them.

    The feeling of being stretched out is normal if you have never been on a road bike. A drop bar cross bike will give you a similar feeling, although they can sometimes be a bit more relaxed in geometry.

    I would stop back by your second store on a different day and at a different time if you were pleased with your customer service on your first bike purchase. If you get the same feeling or treatment I would first politley remind them that you are the one buying the bike and you want to look at road bikes. If they still persist in steering you away from them, just walk away.

    The important thing is to buy what you want and what you like. If you feel buyer's remorse afterward, let it be over how much you spent, not what you spent it on.

    It amazes me the treatment some shops will give to a larger rider when we walk in the door. I missed teh memo about having a larger waist line preventing me from knowing what I want.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    4,976
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To be honest, it sounds like none of the stores you visited were very good. Before making a purchase decision, I'd suggest trying to do a real test-ride on a real road bike. Look for bikes with longer head tubes and a more relaxed riding position: Specialized Roubaix, Cannondale Synapse, Giant Defy (a.k.a. OCR), Felt Z-series, etc. The bike shop employee should, at a minimum, ensure that the tires are inflated to the proper pressure, the saddle is at the right height, and the bike has pedals you can use.

    FYI, I carry a multi-tool in my pocket when riding bikes so I can tweak the height of the saddle if it isn't just right.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Pinyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    1,380
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I also don't think that any of those bike stores did a good job. Especially the third one with respect to fitting you on the bike. Oh, and I would never buy a bike from a place that would not let me take it out on a 10-15 minute ride with some up and down hill sections. Never.

    If I were you, I would go to some other bike stores, maybe re-visit the second one and MAKE them let you try some road bikes out before I made my decision. I don't understand the issue with them not letting you try road bikes, though. You can always jack the stem up higher, and road bars give you more positions for your hands.

    Do they have a store in your area that sells touring or cyclocross type bikes? Lots of cyclocross bikes don't have a place to attach a rear rack, so be careful there if you want to haul stuff on the bike.

    I would ride more than a few, before I made up my mind. I rode a minimum of 4-5 models from each of 5 different stores, before I bought my road bike last spring. Getting a bike that feels and fits right was well worth the effort. So was making sure that I got the bike from a decent bike shop that stands behind their equipment, and has a good repair department.

    Good luck.
    My Bike Blog
    ------
    1987 Trek 1000 Aluminum
    1993 Cannondale M300
    2008 Specialized Allez Elite Compact

  9. #9
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    If I walk intoa shop, the guys immediately point me to hybrids, PFFFT! I'm thick in the middle, getting used to the position on a roadie takes time but once you do, there is nothing that compares!

    Find a roadie you like, make a few changes if needed. Some shops will swap smal parts if they are good. Things like a shorter reach stem, little things that aren't too expensive.

    My thing is to find a bike that feels good at a good price because like your experience, not many shops know how to take care of ME! So price and fit are most important. I can find what I need anywhere anytime at a good price. If you have a bud that rides, chances are you don't need the shop FREE service anyways. Maybe the 30 tuneup. After the free sevice is done, I can turn the barrels a 1/4 turn myself for free and do a better job than paying some dude $20 to turn them.

    As far as adventure stores, I haven't seen a ROADIE that looks worth the price. I have friends that have REI Novara roadies with big regrets. Just met another dude the other day asking about my bike and how he regrets his purchase. I myself have checked them out and found them to be way overpriced for what they are. About 2 monthsa go I spoke with a guy at REI that ws the friendliest guy I had ever met. I think we went to first grade together. Well, made me feel taht way. All the info he provided on the bike was convincing. BUT, I know better! 105 is not top of the line. Low spoke count Alex rims aren't the strongest rims out ther and will not hold my 240 lbs training for 10,000 ft centuries. STI levers are not the latest technology to come out in the last 2 years! They sound good, and are friendly but I'd pass!

    Get a major brand, Trek, Specialized, or one of the other major mfg'ers unless you're loaded with cash. If you ever break your frame by one of these makers, it willbe replaced free if it fails under normal wear. 2 years down the road, the makers at the adventure stores migth not be around. That's if the store is even still there!

    I saw a Novara roadie at REI for $1500. 105 equipped. MY Lemond was a $1000 with 105 and Ultegra which is a step above 105. I rode it hard for 3 years and the frame broke. Trek replaced the frame with a new frame (even after 3 yearsa with the lifetime frame warranty)from a bike worth $2000 absolutely free! Adventure stores won't do that for you!

  10. #10
    Senior Member SmokedDeathDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think that it is great that you went to a few shops and tried out some bikes. That is the way to do it. The best way is to go and try some different bikes. If you think that you want a road bike and you do not really try any and get another type of bike, then if you are anything like me, you will always be wanting one and not really be happy until you get one. It took me a few years to figure this out.

    Anyway, you really do need to find a better, well more suited to your particular needs, place to get it. When I bought my Merlin frame, I was not sure how it would feel. I did not want to spend the money on the mystery of Ti. So, the bike shop that I was working with built it up for me and let me have it for the weekend. Yes, the weekend. They new that I only wanted a frame and fork, but they figured that I might buy the whole thing built up because I had 8 speed on my current bike and this was 9 speed. Anyway, I rode it both days and put a few miles on it. I decided that it was the frame that I really liked and bought it. I had them move my components over to the new frame so I could build my Davidson up for my wife with a triple on it. I wanted to buy the whole bike but my wife said only the frameset

    So, if I were you, I would try to get a road bike that you can ride on one of your regular rides. I would also have them fit you to the bike, you might want to go with a shorter stem at first that is more upright. As you get used to the position, then you can start to stretch out some. A good LBS will do a fit for you, make sure that you are set up right and adjust it for you down the road as you change. Sure, you might have to buy a new stem, but that is a small cost to get you something that feels good from the start, so you will want to ride it more, and not have to get another bike 6 months later.

    I know that comparing a custom Ti frame with a slightly less expensive bike purchase is not the same, but you should be able to get the bike for a 20 to 40 mile ride. If they are a well stocked LBS, you might be able to do this for a week or so trying different bikes to make sure that you get the right one. If they do this, they will have a customer for life. At least the LBS I used to go to did until I moved. When I go and visit family, I still go buy there.
    Ron
    Ron

    2004 Merlin Agilis
    1996 Davidson Stiletto

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Miami, FL
    My Bikes
    2009 Cannondale Caad9-7/2009 BMC SLX01/2011 Marin Nail Trail 29er
    Posts
    1,715
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have around 8 bike shops in my area. Half of the 8 would not even talk to me when i was browsing, sucks IMO. Those 4 shops were out of the question.

    2 other stores the staff was friendly but did not seem very knowledgeable and they only seemed to want to push a bike on me for a sale.

    1 bike shop when I first went there I was assisted by a nice young guy. Very helpful, I thought this was the place for me. I went a few times when this guy wasn't there and the other people left a bad taste in my mouth.

    Final store and favorite, primarily because the salesman was very encouraging. I told him I wanted a road bike but felt like I was to big. He insisted that If I want a road bike get it, that he would fit me properly and that it would work well. Also reminded me that if i get a bike that I really want, I will definately ride a lot more. I ended up spending a few hundred dollars more than I planned, but ended up with a bike I love, service that is great every time I walk into the store. I also felt good about buying from people that take pride in their work and don't discriminate against clydes.

  12. #12
    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,278
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not surprisingly, we don't discriminate against clydes. lol

    How I approach the customer depends on what the customer says when I ask if I can help them. If they say they're looking for a road bike, then that is what we talk about. If they say they're looking for a bike to ride around on the street, then I ask more questions to see if they need a road bike or a hybrid.

    If the customer said they were considering road, cyclocross, and flat-bar road bikes, I would ask a lot of questions. If you aren't going to race cyclocross, I wouldn't buy a cross bike. What you might want instead is a touring/randonneur bike. As such, I would talk about the Fuji Touring, the Masi Randonneur, the Litespeed Sportive (sadly discontinued this year, but we still have a few), and the Surly LHT (which we don't stock, but can order). Flat bar road bikes....if you were planning on doing any mileage at all, I would try to discourage this, or at least make sure you were fully informed about the shortcomings (lack of hand positions being the main one).

    Since it sounds like you are not wanting to be bent too far over, I might talk to you a while about the Fuji CCR line of bikes, which are basically carbon fiber comfort road bikes. They have a taller headtube and slightly more relaxed geometry.

    Basically, there are lots and lots of options out there. Don't let any shop try to pigeon-hole you into one type or one product line. Ride them all. Then buy the bike that makes you smile the most when you ride it.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Fantasminha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Reno, NV
    My Bikes
    Giant FCR, Scott CR1 Team, Fuji Newest 3.0
    Posts
    398
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by flip18436572 View Post
    I went through something similar and ended up with a small LBS after going to multiple other bike shops in the area. I purchased a Jamis road bike, as that is what I wanted, and that was the only LBS that really believed that is what I wanted and could afford. They all pushed me to comfort bikes or hybrids and that is not what I wanted and even thought that is what I said I wanted.

    Good luck with your purchase and go with what you want and not what they push you to!!!!

    Just my opinion.
    I had a similar experience. They think just because your not XS, you won't enjoy a road bike. Don't listen to them! I lost my temper in one of the bike shops and the sales guy dropped me with a female attendant who was much more open minded.

    Don't let them push you around. Be persistent.
    2011 Surley Cross-Check "Meg" for touring
    2008 Giant FCR3 "Ginger" commuter
    2008 Fuji Newest 3.0 "Piccachu"
    2008 Scott CR1 Team "Calypso"
    2009 Dahon Echo foldie "Mimi"

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Aus
    Posts
    632
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the advice. I have a lot to think about the I'l be getting the phone book out to search for other stores.

    Another thing I didn't mention that the guy at the second store told me was something along the lines of

    "Don't ride a whole heap of bikes until you you what you want and are ready to buy"

    The trouble is, thanks even more to my bike shop experiences I don't know what to buy. So how do I know what to buy, if I haven't tried a lot of bikes and found out what works for me? It's like a chicken and egg situation.

    Also, realistically, the more bikes I ride, means I know what I am after, which means I am more prone to buying second hand. And that makes me feel like I am cheating the bike shop.
    I want to live.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    4,976
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by damnable View Post
    Also, realistically, the more bikes I ride, means I know what I am after, which means I am more prone to buying second hand. And that makes me feel like I am cheating the bike shop.
    Are you experienced enough to tackle buying a used bike? Do you know how a bike should fit and what adjustments are possible if it doesn't fit? Do you know what mechanical problems to look for and how to fix them? If not, you might have better luck buying a bike from a quality bike shop...

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Portland, OR
    My Bikes
    Surly LHT set up for commuting
    Posts
    642
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    damnable, I was in a similar position last year when I was shopping for bikes. Fortunately there are some good stores in my area (although I did encounter some thin roady snob shops). I was able to borrow a few road bikes for an extended trial and found that I preferred the touring and cyclocross frame geometries. The pure road bike stances were too aggressive for me (knees hit my gut which was uncomfortable + my back hurt after awhile due to not being in shape for that position). Of course, this may not be the case for you. What I did was to find the frame geometry that I liked and then started to worry about wheels & components. Find a decent store and try out a true road bike, a touring bike, and a cyclocross bike. Good touring bikes have the added benefit of very durable components which should hold up well to large riders. With touring and cyclocross bikes you can also put on narrow tires if you want to go even faster. The road bike will be the fastest and most maneuverable (and lightest). See which geometry you like and work in that frame category to find what works best for you. Good luck!

  17. #17
    Me and the cat... Pamestique's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Tustin, CA
    My Bikes
    2002 Lemond Zurich, 2006 Santa Cruz Superlight, 2010 Landshark, 2012 Santa Cruz Juliana, 2014 Juliana Premiero Origin 29er
    Posts
    4,364
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Been cycling almost 40 years. Have had my share of bad bike buying experiences. For what it is worth...

    Use the internet and do some online research. Check with other Clyde and bike forums. This is really important: understand the type of riding you plan to do. If your riding will just always be fun and casual that's one type of bike. If you ride off road, that's another, if you want to get serious, that's maybe 1 then another 2 or 3 bikes down the road.

    I do advocate if you going to ride streets and paved bike paths, get a road bike. No sense fussing with anything else. It just works better than anything else. Just know there are very quick, twitchy, fast bikes and there are wonderful relaxed geometry touring style bikes. I started out on the touring bike and have since gone onto a more racing style bike although the geometry is somewhat relaxed.

    You need to understand these terms. When you go into the shop and start looking, if you start talking from knowledge, the clerk will treat you differently. Just know, that poor clerk gets all types, many don't know what the heck they want. The clerk has to guess. Make it easy for him, you want a road bike, but with relaxed geometry, more upright positioning, something that can do a casual club ride or a century (I'm just using that as example).

    Also know your materials. Know that you want steel, aluminum, carbon or Ti. Or something inbetween. I love steel. Probably won't ride anything else. Modern steel is lightweight, responsive, comfortable and durable. Know your components. Know the Shimano gruppos or whatever. I know I wouldn't ride with anything less than Ultegra and I know I don't need Dura-Ace. There are price points for each gruppo. If you can afford Ultegra get that. Don't be talked into Dura-Ace. Just not necessary. If you can't afford Ultegra, 105 or Sora is good enough until you can upgrade.

    Next thing to know about is wheels. Good wheels will make a so-so bike much better. I personally have my wheels custom built. It's pricey ($800) but worth it. Make sure the wheels will hold your weight. Don't be talked into some pricey "fast" wheel that will collapse with use.

    As you can see, there is lots to research on the internet. It's well worth the time to do the work... oh yeah, even more important is understanding fit. Fit will make or break even the most expensive bike!

    Hopefully you can find an shop employee like Platypius you seems concerned and knowledgeable and will listen to what they say. They may actually know more than you (possibly but not always). I like what Platy said about flat bars. Unless you are mountain biking, stay away and get a regular drop handlebar.

    I would try and pick Platy's brain for all it's worth!

    And lastly - mountain bikes are for mountain biking. They were never intended for road use. I know lots of people start out on one because they feel more secure on the wide tires etc. But once you try a road bike on pavement, you will wonder what you were thinking.

    PS as another Athena, if you have any questions, just PM me.
    Last edited by Pamestique; 01-19-09 at 05:18 PM.
    ______________________________________________________________

    Private docent led mountain bike rides through Limestone Canyon. Go to letsgooutside.org and register today! Also available: hikes, equestrian rides and family events as well as trail maintenance and science study.

  18. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not to be a complete ass, but I went through this recently and made the /mistake/ of the Trek 7.5 FX. I got the bike in October and just recently got a new Cannondale road bike.

    For a commuting bike, the 7.5 is a great bike, and I'd suggest you try one out if you liked the 7.3 at all (the 7.3 didn't feel as solid as my 7.5), I'd suggest you try out a 7.5.

    And to my shameless plug.... I have one on craigslist right now.

    http://rochester.craigslist.org/bik/998367792.html

    $853 new, I'm selling for $675 - it's in perfect condition, and I can include the receipt. PM/email me if you're interested. I'm willing to ship to a BF member for at-cost shipping.

  19. #19
    Me and the cat... Pamestique's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Tustin, CA
    My Bikes
    2002 Lemond Zurich, 2006 Santa Cruz Superlight, 2010 Landshark, 2012 Santa Cruz Juliana, 2014 Juliana Premiero Origin 29er
    Posts
    4,364
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I keep adding, sorry... you appear to have plenty of money to buy a decent bike. For something between $1500 - 2000 (this is not accounting for sales) you can get a great bike with full Ultegra. You need to consider if maybe WSD sizing is better for you. If your legs are long and upper torso short, it will probably work better for you (again understand sizing and fit). Also if you feel too bent over, the stem can be easily adjusted. Just by adding a 15 degree rise, you can sit more upright. The stem length can also be shortened.

    Word of caution: If the clerk says to you "stand over this bike" and you do and he then says "like the color?..." keep looking! Many shops will tell you that bike is for you because they need to sell that one.
    ______________________________________________________________

    Private docent led mountain bike rides through Limestone Canyon. Go to letsgooutside.org and register today! Also available: hikes, equestrian rides and family events as well as trail maintenance and science study.

  20. #20
    Me and the cat... Pamestique's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Tustin, CA
    My Bikes
    2002 Lemond Zurich, 2006 Santa Cruz Superlight, 2010 Landshark, 2012 Santa Cruz Juliana, 2014 Juliana Premiero Origin 29er
    Posts
    4,364
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Davux... 20" - you about 5'11 or so? Might be big for a chick...

    I'm 5'8" and my MTBike is 17.
    ______________________________________________________________

    Private docent led mountain bike rides through Limestone Canyon. Go to letsgooutside.org and register today! Also available: hikes, equestrian rides and family events as well as trail maintenance and science study.

  21. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BCIpam View Post
    Davux... 20" - you about 5'11 or so? Might be big for a chick...

    I'm 5'8" and my MTBike is 17.

    I'm 5'9"-5'10"... Sometimes it feels a bit small for me. But yeah, it may very well be too big. Regardless of my bike, the 7.5 is still a great bike, and probably worth a shot. I believe there is a WSD version as well, though I don't know what's different.

  22. #22
    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,278
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Davux View Post
    I'm 5'9"-5'10"... Sometimes it feels a bit small for me. But yeah, it may very well be too big. Regardless of my bike, the 7.5 is still a great bike, and probably worth a shot. I believe there is a WSD version as well, though I don't know what's different.
    WSD is somewhat misguided, IMO. What it has led to, in my experience, is a belief that all women need WSD bikes. Not even close.

    WSD assumes several things.
    1. Long legs
    2. Short torso
    3. Small Hands
    4. A predilection for "flowery" colours.

    To be honest, most female cyclists that we get in the store are more in the equal torso/leg and medium-large hands category. And the "girly" colours are almost universally hated.

    Since we do a full, comprehensive fit to all bike buyers (free if they buy a bike, $$$ if they don't), we'll let the customer know if she needs a WSD bike or not. If she doesn't need WSD and doesn't buy a bike from us, at least she knows that she has a much larger group of bikes to choose from.

    Last year we carried the Fuji WSD bikes. We had a very hard time selling them. One was lavender, one was aqua/teal. Both had frilly flower graphics on them. The aqua one had white, low-line Tektro brake calipers. I was ashamed to even suggest them to customers. When we'd walk toward the WSD bike display, 9 out of 10 would say "I don't want any girly colours!". As such, we didn't sell many of the cheaper WSD bikes. What we sold instead was the Fuji Silhouette; $2200 worth of carbon fiber and purple WSD road candy. ( http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...ette&Type=bike )

    We try not to pigeon-hole people. We don't even recommend a bike until a preliminary fit has been done. Then we use the measurements from that to determine if you need a bike with a longer or shorter top tube, a longer or shorter headtube, relaxed geometry, or whatever. THEN we recommend some bikes for you to look at and test ride. This is assuming of course that you didn't come in saying that you wanted a Cervelo RS, or whatever. If that's what you want, that's what you'll get - unless we determine there's just no way to fit you on one.

    I know it can be difficult finding a shop to work with. I've been there too. When I first got into cycling 13 years ago, I went to a LOT of different shops to find the service, knowledge, and non-elitism that I wanted. It's no coincidence I ended up working for them later. lol.

  23. #23
    Decrepit Member Abacus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    My Bikes
    2003 Trek 520, 1996 Trek 370, 1996 Bianchi Osprey, too many others.
    Posts
    309
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    If the customer said they were considering road, cyclocross, and flat-bar road bikes, I would ask a lot of questions. If you aren't going to race cyclocross, I wouldn't buy a cross bike. What you might want instead is a touring/randonneur bike. As such, I would talk about the Fuji Touring, the Masi Randonneur, the Litespeed Sportive (sadly discontinued this year, but we still have a few), and the Surly LHT (which we don't stock, but can order). Flat bar road bikes....if you were planning on doing any mileage at all, I would try to discourage this, or at least make sure you were fully informed about the shortcomings (lack of hand positions being the main one).
    100% correct in every respect.

    I went to a few bike stores. I told them all I was interested in a road bike. They generally tried to put me onto hybrids, except for one place that suggested a Specialized Sirrus, which was both too high and too short for my body shape.

    So I bought some bikes second hand on eBay.

    I now have in my garage a rigid mtb with slicks, a flat bar road bike, and a Trek 520 tourer.

    Guess which one I'm in love with.

  24. #24
    Arsehole PlatyPius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,278
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Abacus View Post
    100% correct in every respect.

    I went to a few bike stores. I told them all I was interested in a road bike. They generally tried to put me onto hybrids, except for one place that suggested a Specialized Sirrus, which was both too high and too short for my body shape.

    So I bought some bikes second hand on eBay.

    I now have in my garage a rigid mtb with slicks, a flat bar road bike, and a Trek 520 tourer.

    Guess which one I'm in love with.
    I think people - and manufacturers - are starting to come back around and realize that we need something other than "race" bikes and hybrids. Touring bikes used to be THE bike for a long time, and they were much better suited for the majority of bike riders. The fun of seeing scenery, being comfortable, and just having a nice, long ride has been lost to the "What is Lance riding?" generation of cyclists.

    All bikes have their purpose. A MTB obviously is going to be best for off-road trails. A flat-bar road bike is good for short commutes. A Cervelo R3 is good for racing. For the majority of road cyclists, though, a touring bike is the best choice; based on what they actually do with their bikes.

    I'm glad that Fuji and Jamis still have their touring bikes, that Masi introduced the Speciale Randonneur this year, and that other brands are also getting into/continuing this market.

  25. #25
    Neil_B
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    4. A predilection for "flowery" colours.
    Heck, they even make flower-patterned multi-tools! My LBS carries them. The owner posted a sign on the counter, "Ladies, look, here's a pretty tool for you!" She has a sense of humor.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •