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  1. #1
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    More than I can chew

    I am 44, 6'5" and 285lbs. I play racquetball and ride an Espresso bike several times a week. I would consider myself athletic. I recently signed up for a charity event that has me riding 100 miles. I could rent a bike tha day of...
    I am going to buy a bike. I have been leaning towards the Specialized Seguoia or the Roubiax. Any suggestions from other big guys would be appreciated. I would prefer a more upright position with not a lot of weight in my hands. I would like to keep the investment <$2000 if possible.

    Thanks,

    Jeff

  2. #2
    Triathlon in my future??? flip18436572's Avatar
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    Go to your LBS' in your area. Talk to them and test ride bikes. Get the one from the best LBS.
    2007 Jamis Ventura Comp
    2006 Jamis Explorer 2.0
    2000 Specialized Hardrock (bought used)
    Swim, Bike, Run and sounds like fun

  3. #3
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    I am 5'10" and in your weight range. I have a 2008 Spec Sequoia and like it. Due to my weight and proportions, I have it set up for me to ride in a very upright position as I am not flexable. Of course, the negative to that is alot of weight on your bottom. The 2008 has carbon seat stays.

    I owned a Spec Roubaix last year. Loved the bike and its ride, but I just couldn't get the bars high enough to be comfortable. If I could have gotten it to fit better, I would still have that bike.

    The two bikes have a somewhat similar geometry, but the Sequoia's have a taller head tube.

  4. #4
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    I was really impressed with the Specialized Roubaix Elite and Expert when I test-rode them last year. Would have purchased a Roubaix Pro frame if they'd been in stock when I was looking. Instead, I ended up with a Cervelo RS. The Roubaix has a more upright riding position than the Specialized Tarmac race bike, but that's not to say it's relaxed by any means...

  5. #5
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    I ride a Lemon sloping top tube bike. Somewhat upright I guess. One of the best things I've done is buy the bike bfore they cut the steer tube down on the fork. Left more height for a higher postion of the stem.

    If you buy a bike off the floor (pre built) you might not have the option unless the shop plans ahead!

  6. #6
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Oops, forgot the "d"

  7. #7
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
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    You don't want to be too upright or the extra air resistance will kill you over 100 miles. Racers tend to lean forward with their upper back almost horizontal, and have the handlebars several inches lower than the seat, to minimize their drag, but long distance tour riders are more likely to have the handlebars at about the same level as the seat. You should aim for that, so your torso is close to 45 degress. Because the seat is set back behind the pedals, your centre of gravity is actually over your feet, with your butt behind your centre of gravity, and your hand in front, the way a diver crouches as she prepares to dive, so there won't be as much weight on your hands as you think.

    I agree you should get your own bike and put a lot of miles on it before hand. You may be in shape to ride a hundred miles, but your butt isn't.
    Last edited by cooker; 02-13-09 at 04:55 PM.

  8. #8
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    Cooker...I hear that. I did 20 this AM in the gym. At the 12 mile mark I was looking for the sheepskin slip on. Thanks for all the advice folks.

  9. #9
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    Despite being athletic, I'd encourage you to increase your mileage gradually. There are certain parts of your body that will take a different kind of stress than what they are used to from other sports.

  10. #10
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Keeping weight off your hands is a matter of fitting and proper saddle adjustment, not the bike. If your hands go numb, then tip the nose of the saddle up, and bets are the saddle is already nose down and needs to be level.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  11. #11
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    The bikes you named are a good start... but there is no overall difference in quality or weight or durability from any of the major bike manufacturers. So just make sure that the bike you get is the one that is most comfortable. Make sure that the shop where you buy it will work with you to get the bike fit dialed in after the fact, as a 15 minute test ride will reveal some shortcomings, but your first week of riding the bike every day may bring other problems to light... and most can be corrected with a change in stem, saddle, or other simple adjustments.

    As a big guy, I reccomend you pay closest attention to the durability of the wheels. Avoid any wheel with fewer than 32 spokes, and if possibvle, get your wheels hand built or at least re-tensioned by an experienced builder.

    If you intend to take advantage of the LBS after-sale service, try to find a shop that is close to your home or work... when I worked in a shop I would often get complaints from people who live an hour away and bought a bike from us but have trouble bringing it in for service... but they have to pass ten or twelve other shops on their way to get to us.

  12. #12
    bear murphjam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooker View Post
    I agree you should get your own bike and put a lot of miles on it before hand. You may be in shape to ride a hundred miles, but your butt isn't.
    +1 Before I got into biking I just borrowed a bike to do a 50 mile charity ride. Back then I was in really good shape so I thought it would be no problem. Well my legs thought it was no problem, but my butt did. I ended up riding the last 13 miles standing up. I actually considered the 75 mile route before I signed up, butt after that experience I was so glad I didn't.

  13. #13
    POWERCRANK addict markhr's Avatar
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    If you're concerned about being too stretched out you may need, depending on fit, to put in a shorter, higher rise stem.

    I hope you can test ride at least some of these:

    trek portland - http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...land/portland/

    cannondale cross xr7 - http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/08/c...del-8XR7C.html

    Brodie Ronin '09 - http://www.brodiebikes.com/2009/bikes/ronin.php
    Brodie Ronin '08 - http://www.brodiebikes.com/2008/2008_bikes/ronin.php

    rocky mountain solo cxd - http://www.bikes.com/main+en+01_102+...tml?BIKE=606#2

    kona sutra - http://www.konaworld.com/08_sutra_w.htm
    Kona Sutra - http://www.konaworld.com/09_sutra_en.cfm
    Kona Dew Drop - http://www.konaworld.com/09_dewdrop_en.cfm

    Orbea Diem Drop Disc (2009) - http://www.orbea.com/en-gb/productos...icicletas.aspx (see road bikes > fitness > diem drop disc)

    focus cross disc - http://www.focusbikesuk.com/focuscyc...cross_disc.php
    focus mares disc 2009 - http://www.focusbikesuk.com/focuscyc...mares_disc.php

    Devinci Caribou2 (2009) - http://www.devinci.com/11628_an.html

    Raleigh USA Sojourn (2009) - http://www.raleighusa.com/bikes/road/sojourn/

    Rei Novara buzz road bike (2009) - http://www.rei.com/product/779985

    rotwild rs1cx - http://www.rotwild.de/en/ (street bikes section)

    Fixie Inc. Pureblood - http://www.cycles-for-heroes.com/bik...oss/pure-blood
    fixie inc. pureblood - http://www.cycles-for-heroes.com/200...pureblood.html

    Salsa la Cruz - http://www.salsacycles.com/laCruzComp08.html
    Salsa Fargo - http://www.salsacycles.com/fargoComp09.html

    Opus Sentiero - http://opusbike.com/site_route.php?lang=en (see 2009 bikes > road > cyclocross)

    Genesis Croix de Fer - http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/series/croix_de_fer

    BikesDirect Motobecane Fantom Cross Outlaw - http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...ane/outlaw.htm

    Baron bicycles - http://baronbicycles.com/spec.htm
    shameless POWERCRANK plug
    Recommended reading for all cyclists - Cyclecraft - Effective Cycling
    Condor Cycles - quite possibly the best bike shop in London
    Don't run red lights, wear a helmet, use hand signals, get some cycle lights(front and rear) and, FFS, don't run red lights!

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