Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-13-09, 03:44 PM   #1
Area_Man
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 24
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My neighborhood is ALL HILLS

I don't think there's a flat piece of road anywhere around me for many miles. From my front door, I go about 200 yards down a steep slope to the street. From the street, there are three ways out of my neighborhood. One has a one-mile climb that's so steep the city closes that road every single time it snows. They get a dozen car crashes in fifteen minutes the morning after a snow routinely. The back way has a dip down and a slope up that's much steeper but shorter, that one always gets closed, too. The other back way is a one-mile climb that doesn't get closed to traffic quite as much, but it's a hell of a climb.

I can't make it up any of them without being completely winded and trashed.

My bike's either in 1st gear or I'm flying down the other side of the hill, riding the brakes and trying to keep within the limits of my ability to see road debris. 2mph or 40, no middle ground.

Any suggestions for how to tackle this situation? I want to ride to lose weight. Ultimately, it's probably best to just ride three days a week to exhaustion and figure my endurance will increase over the summer. What else is there to do?
Area_Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 04:10 PM   #2
EasyEd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Marysville WA
Bikes:
Posts: 439
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Man, that is harsh. Is there some kind of bike path in your area that you can take your bike too? I know that loading the bike in the car to take it somewhere else is a bummer, but it sounds like it's either that or ride those hills.
EasyEd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 04:30 PM   #3
Bill Kapaun
Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Bikes: 86 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.
Posts: 9,201
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Maybe if you mentioned what bike & gearing you have, there would be some suggestions on how to change that to something more hill friendly?
Bill Kapaun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 04:50 PM   #4
Mr. Beanz
Banned.
 
Mr. Beanz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Upland Ca
Bikes: Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
Posts: 20,030
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Trade you, this is out my front door!


That is this road here!

Last edited by Mr. Beanz; 02-13-09 at 04:56 PM.
Mr. Beanz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 05:27 PM   #5
Mr. Beanz
Banned.
 
Mr. Beanz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Upland Ca
Bikes: Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
Posts: 20,030
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
All I can say is to keep at it. Use the low gear and take your time. It will get easier as your legs and fitness develope or you'll get faster. As far as teh way down, sometimes it's safer to let it roll. If you ride the brakes in the summertime, you can create a heat induced blowout. I've done it mtb'ing in the summertime heat.

One stretch near the bottom, I let it roll at 45. A rider will get used to the speed, then it feels like 20mph. If you continue to ride the brakes, it only makes the bike squirrely and hard to handle. Hit the front and you might flip.
Mr. Beanz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 05:56 PM   #6
jboyd
Senior Member
 
jboyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Southern Illinois
Bikes: Giant "Rainier"
Posts: 784
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Are we neighbors, because that is where I live?

One consolation is that the hills will get smaller over time, and in the same, so will you
That time will come at the same time that you can bounce a quarter off your thigh, and you feel like you are developing an addiction. I love that feeling

Keep it up.

Jay
jboyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 06:09 PM   #7
Area_Man
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 24
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I know that road well, I used to hike Baldy once a week from Manker Flats. The hike starts at 5500 feet, and it was about a seven hour round trip for me to summit and be back at the car.
Area_Man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 06:17 PM   #8
Pamestique 
Shredding Grandma!
 
Pamestique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: So Cal
Bikes: I don't own any bikes
Posts: 4,795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
So Area Man how lucky are you? Some people have to drive a long way to do hills. Just assume all rides are hilly and you have no choice. That will teach you to be a better climber and talk about getting strong - fast.

Being a "fluffy" gal, I use to avoid hills and then one day I decided to stop avoiding them. I purposely started climbing ever hill I could find. Now flat rides are really boring. I hate them!

The best piece of advice given me... is from a friend on a mountain bke ride. We were climbing a particularly steep trail when he rode up and asked "why are you trying so hard? Why don't you just take a rest and enjoy the climb?" It took me a bit to understand what he meant. There is a reason bikes come with gears. And there is a reason aerobic activity is better than anerobic. When I start a climb I gear down to the easiest, most comfortable gear and just spin trying very hard not to get winded. Once you get winded, and go anerobic, all effect and benefit is lost.

So use those hills to measure your fitness. Keep trying. Sooner or later it will get easy and you will be very strong so strong flats will be incredibly easy. The weight will melt off!! It did for me but then for some reason I stopped riding... never do that!!!
__________________
______________________________________________________________

Private docent led mountain bike rides through Limestone Canyon. Go to letsgooutside.org and register today! Also available: hikes, equestrian rides and family events as well as trail maintenance and science study.
Pamestique is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 07:19 PM   #9
Arvadaman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 268
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A few things come to mind.

Pick the one that is the gentlest slope. If possible.

You might check out a mapping program or topo maps to see if you can find flatter
routes.

Ride within your ability and ride often. The hills around my place are getting smaller as I
develop more stamina.

Investigate the gearing on whatever bikes you available and pick the one
with the lowest gears to ride.

I know it isn't much but that is what I have to offer.
Arvadaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 07:49 PM   #10
StephenH
Uber Goober
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 11,235
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Don't be afraid to load the bike up, drive somewhere better, and ride there. Even if it's still hilly, if it's just less hilly, that'd be an improvement. Any lakes or parks around? Any downtown areas that are flatter? Any winding gently sloping roads beside rivers?
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 08:46 PM   #11
Fastflyingasian
Draft Producer
 
Fastflyingasian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: south shore , Ma
Bikes: fuji CCR 1.0 carbon,Surley Pacer,02 norco shore freeride MTB, cannondale rigid MTB, Fuji aloha 1.0, Monty trials bike
Posts: 381
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
Trade you, this is out my front door!


That is this road here!
so ah............ is there any houses for sale on your road . i am more then willing to climb that as long as the decent is awesome. if you tell me that ill end up riding the brakes all the way down ill take that statement back
Fastflyingasian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 09:45 PM   #12
downtube42
Senior Member
 
downtube42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: San Angelo, TX
Bikes: Volae Team, '76 Motobecane Grand Jubile
Posts: 1,705
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Gear down, sit down, and take your time.

And make sure your seat is high enough.
downtube42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-09, 11:56 PM   #13
Mr. Beanz
Banned.
 
Mr. Beanz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Upland Ca
Bikes: Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
Posts: 20,030
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastflyingasian View Post
so ah............ is there any houses for sale on your road . i am more then willing to climb that as long as the decent is awesome. if you tell me that ill end up riding the brakes all the way down ill take that statement back

Actually I live near the bottom,not on the road itself!...The desent is ok. I'd rather do GMR with the switchbacks though. Baldy is a straight shot pretty much but I hate the rocks. SOme can be very large, I keep my eyes on the opposite side of the road while climbing, taking notes of obstacles. Some people are aftraid to decend GMR so they take Baldy Rd.

This is GMR (Glendora Mtn Rd). 21 mile climb to Baldy Village. But this is the final 8 miles, all switchbacks like this!



Last edited by Mr. Beanz; 02-14-09 at 12:02 AM.
Mr. Beanz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-09, 12:13 AM   #14
Rollfast
What happened?
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Around here somewhere
Bikes:
Posts: 3,309
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
If you had more snow you could at least MTB up and slalom down...
Rollfast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-09, 12:27 AM   #15
JeanCoutu
ǝıd ǝʌol ʎllɐǝɹ I
 
JeanCoutu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 518
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pamestique View Post
The best piece of advice given me... is from a friend on a mountain bke ride. We were climbing a particularly steep trail when he rode up and asked "why are you trying so hard? Why don't you just take a rest and enjoy the climb?" It took me a bit to understand what he meant. There is a reason bikes come with gears. And there is a reason aerobic activity is better than anerobic. When I start a climb I gear down to the easiest, most comfortable gear and just spin trying very hard not to get winded. Once you get winded, and go anerobic, all effect and benefit is lost.
I learnt to climb while out with a person on foot. The way we were going went by a really steep hill that always caused me to either dismount if I wasn't feeling frisky or to reach the top wet and wasted otherwise. Well, that day I was on a singlespeed bike, geared for the flats, but being restricted to walking speed I slowly went up at a ridiculously low rpm, thinking I'd eventually just dismount and walk. But somehow I didn't get winded worse then I would have been had I walked the bike up the hill and reached the top with no difficulties. Zen illumination moment thingie.
JeanCoutu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-09, 06:06 AM   #16
jesspal
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Miami, FL
Bikes: 2009 BMC SLX01/2016 Santa Cruz Bronson
Posts: 1,737
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
I'd kill to have some nice hills. I rode a 100 miles last week with literally 2 feet of elevation and a couple small bridges.
jesspal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-09, 07:28 AM   #17
dygituljunky
Senior Member
 
dygituljunky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: East Metro Atlanta, GA, USA
Bikes: Giant Sedona (Mid 90's), Giant Seek 2, Greenspeed Anura
Posts: 343
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The best advice is to keep at it.

Atlanta is rolling hills with some really steep ones that challenge my ability to balance the bike.

I started off riding one mile in to work from a nearby parking lot. As I got my endurance up, I was able to ride from the nearest transit station, then the next nearest, and then I made the leap to 9.15 miles each way in rolling hills in traffic.

I'm now to the point where my commute time is dropping down from the 1.25 hour mark for the full distance to near the 40 minute mark, on a good day, for the full distance (through a combination of better fitness and better routing).

I'm also now to the point where I'm training my multi-day endurance, no longer wimping out on more than two days in a row.

The best thing for going up hill is to learn to balance (I had to re-learn) and spin slowly up the hills. Don't try to stand in the pedals unless there's no other way to conquer the hill. It is both far more energy intensive and we Clydes/Athenas can put more torque on bike frames than they were designed to handle.
dygituljunky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-09, 07:37 AM   #18
IceNine
El Duderino
 
IceNine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes: 84 Raleigh Portage, 83 Trek 620
Posts: 478
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Area Man: Do you know how many gear inches you have in your lowest gear? A lot of people adjust the gearing on their touring bikes so that the lowest gear is less than 20 gear inches. That's hard to get in a stock set up, but you might benefit from something like that. If you're not sure of your gear inches, then see if you can count the teeth on your smallest chain ring (in front) and the largest cog on your cassette.

It sucks for you to deal with hills at this point, but if you stick with it, you will thank them-thar hills in the future.
IceNine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-09, 10:03 AM   #19
Mr. Beanz
Banned.
 
Mr. Beanz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Upland Ca
Bikes: Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
Posts: 20,030
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dygituljunky View Post

It is both far more energy intensive and we Clydes/Athenas can put more torque on bike frames than they were designed to handle.
That could be true! .........Although I rarely stand, still happened to me, "wrote a song about it"!



Mr. Beanz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-09, 02:27 PM   #20
Richard_Rides
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Santa Clarita, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,371
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgIL6eHHgZU


7.5 Gear Inches!
Richard_Rides is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-09, 05:08 PM   #21
MattMoore
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My area is something quite similar to that, but I've figured out a route that goes across the hills insteed of straight up now the bad weather as finally gone, I'll b out on the bike tomorrow instead of on the turbo trainer
MattMoore is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:57 PM.