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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 03-17-09, 08:50 PM   #1
jeffswood
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Training Hard AND losing weight is a problem.

The only way I have I found that I can lose weight is to eat less food and cut out crap food. I have never found that I can ever drop LBs by just exercising alone. The problem is I have been training for a triathlon and I would like to drop another 10lbs by race day 6 weeks away (I am 194lbs today). Of course I am also training hard and putting up lots of KMs on my bike, shoes and in the pool.

I can seem to find a balance between, eating enough to fuel my workouts, but not eating too much that I dont drop weight.

Does anyone else have this issue or a solution that worked for you?
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Old 03-18-09, 12:41 AM   #2
somebadlemonade
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i notice if i eat the right foods at the right times, meaning carb loading before a good workout, and staying away from tons of protein, i eat oatmeal or some kind of cereal for breakfast, a mid morning snack which is one piece/serving of any kind of fruit i have, then lunch, if i am going to eat junk food this is the time i do it as a snack in between lunch and dinner, and i keep it light for dinner and no desert. after that i try to do anything for 30 minutes a day on the off days, it can be anything from a light/low pace ride, down to just walking, most people here call them recovery rides, and without them you tend to buck up and just keep on adding muscle, which as we all know adds weight. don't worry so much about weight, worry about how your cloths are fitting and how your muscle are starting to show, you'll find you hit a balance point where you just can't seem to lose anymore weight, this is when your cloths start fitting better and your muscles start toning up. and if nothing else cut out simple sugars, and add complex sugars, cut out fruit juices(unless you make them yourself and don't add sugar to them) soda and sweets, if you want something sweet eat fruit.
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Old 03-18-09, 01:19 AM   #3
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Agree with somebadlemonade: timing is everything! The number of calories you eat, versus the number you burn, determines whether you lose weight or not. The types of calories you eat and when you eat them determines whether you'll have a good work-out or not.

Also keep in mind that you can vary your calorie intake day to day. If you're planning a heavy work-out, eat a bit more. If you're planning a light "recovery" work-out, eat less. I try to schedule work-outs around meals, so I don't have to eat an additional snack to fuel the work-out or recovery. I might, for example, eat a late lunch, then go for a ride, then eat a snack when I'm done to help fuel recovery.
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