Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31
  1. #1
    creaky old bones FZ1Tom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Springfield, Misery
    My Bikes
    Trek 7200
    Posts
    267
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    First road bike a fixie?

    Like many, I'm somewhat intrigued.

    I've been browsing around town at several LBS's, and as expected there are wide differences in atmosphere and inventory, etc.

    I can see why so many do like fixies - they're often quite attractive to look at. In my case I got taken by a yellow Masi Speciale Sprint, although I would have to insist on a second hood/brake lever lest I forget, reach for a non-existent hood by mistake and wipe out.

    The price tags are generally attractive - seems that about 600-800 MSRP is pretty common, and that's a lot more affordable to my way of thinking than 1500 on up.

    So, the $64,000 question:

    Can a fixie be a good option for a re-entry road/Clyde? I think a steel frame is a good thing, and simplicity and all that is also good, but, but.....no gears?

    Is it difficult to change rings? Same chain or different one required? Or does this depend more on the dropout design?

    I do live in a slightly hilly area, although once I make it up to the top it's pretty flat all the way across town. I eventually intend to get a bike rack, and that would add a lot of flexibility, but running around with a bike strapped to the back of the car does use gas, and that seems somehow a bit self-defeating.

    Come to think of it, any reason NOT to get a fixie now and a roadie later?

    Tom

  2. #2
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    My Bikes
    '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2009 Spesh Singlecross
    Posts
    11,348
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you're going to go with 1 gear only, for a hilly area I'd suggest a singlespeed instead of a fixed gear as your first bike. (The difference being that a singlespeed can coast, a fixed gear cannot.) I too live in a hilly area and ride a fixed/single flip-flop (fixed cog on one side, freewheel on the other) so I can get a low enough gear ratio that I'm comfortable on the long climbs without having to spin out at a bazillion rpms coming back down those same hills.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Hull, QC
    Posts
    661
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Go for it.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,172
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you're in great shape, a singlespeed can be a fun first bike. If you're not in great shape, you might regret not having at least a couple of gears available. I, personally, would never buy a fixed-gear bike for use on the road. I'd be constantly worried about losing control on hills, pedal strike going through corners, etc. Lots of people love fixies, but they're just not for me...

  5. #5
    creaky old bones FZ1Tom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Springfield, Misery
    My Bikes
    Trek 7200
    Posts
    267
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would definitely flip the rear hub and go as a singlespeed - the greenways have some SHARP curves where pedal strike would be an issue on any bike. Shapewise I'll just have to keep working on....isn't that the whole point?

    Looks like most fixed gear bikes I've seen for sale have flip-flop hubs. Alas, they probably have lawyer lips on the dropouts too.....just discovered that cancer when I was browsing Cycles Unlimited. Even the umpteen-dollar Serottas had 'em! (and let me guess, taking the lawyer lips off with a Dremel voids any warranties, right?)

    I'll see if I can't scare up a test ride sometime in the next few days and then go from there

    Tom

  6. #6
    Senior Member theetruscan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    386
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My first three road bikes were singlespeeds. The second and third had flip-flop hubs. They were awesome in slightly hilly towns (Portland, Nashville) and hell in San Francisco for an out of shape clyde. If your town is only a bit hilly, go for it. Start out 44/17 (or 42/17 if really out of shape) singlespeed, and only go fixed when you're comfortable with the idea. You will get popped out of your seat the first time you ride fixed because you will go to coast. If your balance is poor, you'll crash at least once.

    Don't listen to hipsters, two brakes is a good thing. Especially once you put a rack on the back, and haul your groceries down a hill. Don't **** about with one brake after you start carrying things. You can get by with just a front brake without loading the bike down but its silly. All the 1 brake works comments are about fixed gear only, whenever you're riding singlespeed you need two brakes for any safety.

  7. #7
    creaky old bones FZ1Tom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Springfield, Misery
    My Bikes
    Trek 7200
    Posts
    267
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yah, Springfield is only slightly hilly and in just a few places at that.....certainly no comparison to Portland or Nashville!

    I would insist on two brakes as God intended, and I would also bet dollars to donuts (oops, bad pun!) that the VAST majority of fixed gear bike buyers around here, as elsewhere, immediately flip their hubs to the singlespeed side and just ride that way, two brake or no

    Tom

  8. #8
    Lone Star Tex_Arcana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Houston, Tx.
    Posts
    562
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Confession time!

    I posted a while back I was planning to buy a Specialized Globe Vienna, but when the time came around the sale was over and my wife informed me that the budget I had was no longer valid. Still needed a new bike though because my Ironhorse Urban was on it's last legs.

    I ended up going to the Performance Bike store near my home. I had in mind something like the Schwinn Coffee. Just something to get me back and forth to work while I fix up an old Raleigh Gran Sport I found near my dumpster that a neighbor threw out.

    Anyway, what I ended up with is the darling of the fixed/SS forum (If you mention it in there it just brings on the hate from all the snobs and hipsters) the 2008 SE Draft for $215 (sales tax included). A single speed flat bar road bike in Hi Ten steel and a flip flop hub (though no track cog...YET).

    I know you get what you pay for, but to tell the truth, I'm having hella fun riding that bike. Can't wait until the weather calms out on my day off so I can take it on a long distance ride (commute to work is 3 miles each way). Already planning the upgrades.

    One thing about SS/fixed is your stuck with one gear the temptation to shift way low until it too easy is missing.
    Last edited by Tex_Arcana; 03-26-09 at 01:17 PM.
    Men do not quit playing because they grow old; they grow old because they quit playing. ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

    My Website: New Home http://www.eclectic-relic.co.cc/
    I'm a Twittering Idiot: http://twitter.com/Tex_Arcana

  9. #9
    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Paradise, TX
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross Check, Redline Monocog 29er, Generic Track bike, Surly Pugsley, Salsa Fargo, Schwinn Klunker
    Posts
    1,524
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Go for the Masi. I demo roade one a couple weeks ago and it was a nice ride. It has a flip flop hub, but you can set it up with freewheels on both sides if you want. Try about two teeth different for days when you don't feel as strong. It is geared pretty steep stock especially for a new rider. Go to Sheldon Browns gear inch calulator and figure out what frewheel you'll need to get the gearing right. Aim for around 65 gear inches to start, but you will do some experimenting from there. I run 75-80 gear inches, but that is to keep up with group road rides around 20-24mph pace.
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
    May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey

  10. #10
    The Fred Menace! RI_Swamp_Yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    331
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fixies are fun because they are massively impractical, and demand a large level of physical ability and riding skill. They're challenging and look cool.

    If you do not have a large level of physical ability and riding skill, you will park it in a corner and just look at it from time to time, wishing you were cool enough to ride such a cool bike.

    Gears first, fixie when you're bored of gears.

    If you live in a flat area (Florida, coastal Louisiana, Nebraska), a single speed looks just like a fixie and won't shred your ankles and calves and mess your knees up. If you don't live in a flat area, go for the gears.

    Even in a flat area, I was breaking pedals, trashing BBs and cranks and pringling rear wheels on my single speed back in college (I was a 260lb clyde then). It took a while to gain the strength to tackle the inclines on bridges without walking, and a lot longer to learn how to modulate that strength so I didn't trash the bike. If I had the money, I would have gotten at least a 3sp. Looking back at how much I spent getting the rear wheel trued as often as I did, I could have bought a nice one.

  11. #11
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    My Bikes
    '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2009 Spesh Singlecross
    Posts
    11,348
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you live in a flat area (Florida, coastal Louisiana, Nebraska), a single speed looks just like a fixie and won't shred your ankles and calves and mess your knees up. If you don't live in a flat area, go for the gears.

    Or, a gear ratio on a singlespeed which allows you to spin a reasonable cadence and not mess up your knees on the hills. I run a 42/18 on both my fixed and free sides for exactly this reason.

    Even in a flat area, I was breaking pedals, trashing BBs and cranks and pringling rear wheels on my single speed back in college (I was a 260lb clyde then). It took a while to gain the strength to tackle the inclines on bridges without walking, and a lot longer to learn how to modulate that strength so I didn't trash the bike.

    That's not the fault of the bike being a singlespeed. That's general equipment failure and I'd be willing to bet this wasn't the best of bikes to start with. I've got a 1988 Trek 400 frame/fork which I salvaged from a dumpster, built up with mostly 1991 105sc parts from an old PDG Series-5 (including the wheels, although I rebuilt the rear around an IRO high-flange hub). I'm 250 pounds and I hammer this bike on everything from a stationary trainer, to the velodrome, to city streets for a 25 mile commute which includes a couple of 1 mile (or longer) hills of 6% minimum grade.

    To the OP - A singlespeed isn't going to be the easiest bike to get around on if there are significant hills, but with the right gear ratio it's not going to ruin your knees. Built well, it won't spend more time in the shop than under your butt. Well selected components don't just magically fall apart because the bike only has one gear. Like any Clyde-appropriate bike, look for a minimum 32h wheelset and have it tensioned properly. Don't cheap out on your chainring and cog, either: 1/8" instead of 3/32", and (if I may push a brand) check out Surly's chainrings and cogs.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  12. #12
    creaky old bones FZ1Tom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Springfield, Misery
    My Bikes
    Trek 7200
    Posts
    267
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the debate everyone, naysayers and go-for-its alike.

    About breaking stuff - I bent a set of drop bars (old and heavy ones at that) on my ancient Varsity when trying to use it for extra leverage on a steep climb once. My wheels were in sad, sad shape but that was more my fault because I didn't realize what "trued" meant and thought that just because a spoke or three was missing shouldnt be too much of a problem, right?

    Anyways, live and learn....even today. I didn't think about that freewheeling hub option on both sides for example...duh, so simple! And I'm sure that changing a crankring is not exactly like having to work on a VW Wabbit....is it?

    Luckily the local Masi dealer is also a Surly dealer, so that should work out. Looks like they do lots of wheels too.

    Swamp Yankee, you in Rhode Island? Nice country, I was just up there for my cousin's commissioning in the US Navy at Newport back on the weekend of the 6th. Lotsa bicyclists too!

    Tom

  13. #13
    crash 5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    mpls
    My Bikes
    90s? serotta t-max, 09' planet x ti frame w/sram force, '10 Bianchi Volpe
    Posts
    262
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    dont get caught up in the fixie/hipster scene. other than working on your spin or as a winter beater in minnesota, they are massively impractical. surleys are garbage and anyone over 200lbs is going to need someone driving the rear of the bike, not unlike a ladder truck, fire engine. no, let me rephrase that, surleys are good entry level bikes for the average sized rider.

    for a flat city, city bike, id say yes, but you will notice the shortcomings the second you throw a leg over one and wish you had gears and the option to freewheel. one speed bikes are great for a third bike, but not as a road bike.

    jmo

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    511
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FZ1Tom View Post

    Come to think of it, any reason NOT to get a fixie now and a roadie later?

    Tom
    Bad idea. They harder to ride. And of course, you cannot coast. At the VERY least get something with a fix/flop so you can switch over to something coastable.

    True they are cheaper singlespeeds, but look closely and you can see some reasonable CX options that will give you clyde friendly strength and gearing options. Check out the Surly Cross-Check.

    Singlespeeds are a specialty member of the stable. They are for VERY GOOD cyclists who can spin like crazy and mash like a champ. For someone getting back in, you want to choose your gears on the fly.
    Last edited by BearSquirrel; 03-26-09 at 07:51 PM.

  15. #15
    The Fred Menace! RI_Swamp_Yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    331
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Swamp Yankee, you in Rhode Island?

    A-yup. Born and raised "on the Island" (Aquidneck Island), tho I have spent some time in far-away and exotic lands, like Massachusetts. I'm in Providence, these days, and take the train into Baaaahhh-stin. Since every neighborhood in the city usually has the word "Hill" or "Mount" in it, you can guess what my commute to the station's gonna be like once I put my beater on the road. I'm giving serious though to going anti-fixie, and retrofit a crank-set with a granny gear onto my old ten-speed.

  16. #16
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    My Bikes
    '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2009 Spesh Singlecross
    Posts
    11,348
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by grimace308 View Post
    surleys are garbage and anyone over 200lbs is going to need someone driving the rear of the bike, not unlike a ladder truck, fire engine. no, let me rephrase that, surleys are good entry level bikes for the average sized rider.
    Utter horsepucky. I don't know where you got that information, but it's 100% BS.

    I weigh 250 pounds, and I ride a 2008 Surly Cross-Check as my routine commuter and brevet bike. I've done 8 centuries, 3x 200k and a double century on it in the last 15 months and I'm doing a 300k on it next weekend. Aside from having to replace the rear rim from wearing it thin due to riding almost 5500 miles on it through abrasive conditions (PNW winter sand/cinders and wet summer road grit on lots of hills) the bike has been perfect.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  17. #17
    Senior Member theetruscan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    386
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by grimace308 View Post
    dont get caught up in the fixie/hipster scene. other than working on your spin or as a winter beater in minnesota, they are massively impractical. surleys are garbage and anyone over 200lbs is going to need someone driving the rear of the bike, not unlike a ladder truck, fire engine. no, let me rephrase that, surleys are good entry level bikes for the average sized rider.

    for a flat city, city bike, id say yes, but you will notice the shortcomings the second you throw a leg over one and wish you had gears and the option to freewheel. one speed bikes are great for a third bike, but not as a road bike.

    jmo
    I vehemently disagree. I rode singlespeed/fixed gear bikes exclusively for the first two years after I started bike commuting/riding, and they were so much fun I've finally started riding road bikes. Fixies are serious gateway bikes. It's so simple, so easy, so bulletproof that you just ride. Sure, some things are hard, and some are even undoable, but as you're getting into biking there's a lot to be said for a bike that simply works. I know that I would never have stuck with biking if I'd had some of the problems my (quite nice) geared bike has had occasionally. Derailleur gets out of adjustment, chain gets stressed or stretches, tooth gets caught and bent, whatever it may be, you don't have that with a singlespeed.

    Is it the be-all, end-all? No, of course not. But, it's a cheap, fun, troublefree way to play around on a bicycle.

    In full disclosure, I've been riding about 65/35 geared/fixed the last month as I train for a major distance ride, so I'm not unable to break away from the one speed.

    EDIT: And the Surly Long Haul Trucker is one of the great sturdy value bikes available right now.

  18. #18
    crash 5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    mpls
    My Bikes
    90s? serotta t-max, 09' planet x ti frame w/sram force, '10 Bianchi Volpe
    Posts
    262
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    Utter horsepucky. I don't know where you got that information, but it's 100% BS.

    I weigh 250 pounds, and I ride a 2008 Surly Cross-Check as my routine commuter and brevet bike. I've done 8 centuries, 3x 200k and a double century on it in the last 15 months and I'm doing a 300k on it next weekend. Aside from having to replace the rear rim from wearing it thin due to riding almost 5500 miles on it through abrasive conditions (PNW winter sand/cinders and wet summer road grit on lots of hills) the bike has been perfect.
    i call it personal experience, but you can call it whatever you want. there is always the option that the two of us are looking for and expecting, different things from the bikes we ride. if your cross check is stiff enough for your 250lbs thats totally cool. i found the steamroller not to my liking (whippy) and ***edit: my bad, my bad, i was thinking of the bridgestone XOs that had problems with their bb shells, not surlys***. i have also heard the the one built for carrying stuff is the greatest thing in the universe, so take the whatever you read on the internet with a grain of salt.
    Last edited by grimace308; 03-29-09 at 10:13 AM.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    35
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My first--and only--bike is a fixie.

    In my experience, riding fixed forces fitness like bootcamp, especially if you commute on it. there is no way to be lazy on a fixie, especially if you are trying to not be late for work.

    I have a flip flop hub, although i have never used the free sprocket. one of the main reasons i built my bike (well, the reasoning i used with people that didn't understand how sweet the minimalist aesthetic is) was that I would still be getting an arobic workout pedaling down hill, too. It keeps blood flowing and your heart rate from slowing. I look it like lifting small amounts of weight at hi repetitions--it builds lean muscle, and pedal up hills builds strength and power.

    I say go for it, and still enjoy the torturing rides you will no doubt endure.

  20. #20
    crash 5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    mpls
    My Bikes
    90s? serotta t-max, 09' planet x ti frame w/sram force, '10 Bianchi Volpe
    Posts
    262
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by theetruscan View Post
    I vehemently disagree.
    EDIT: And the Surly Long Haul Trucker is one of the great sturdy value bikes available right now.
    totally cool, well agree to disagree. fixies are, as one poster put it, a special breed in the stable, not the only horse in the corral. here are my opinions, so procced to salt the fries.

    it is a rough first weeks learning curve, very rough for some and sadly too rough for one or two. for you non-brake usin' purists, what happens when your clydesdale self, snaps his chain during a kickstop?

    honestly, do you get dropped by your roadie/hybrid friends on road rides? (youre only lying to yourself) would you want to ride with a guy on a fixie, when youre on a roadie?

    they are fine training bikes. they are great winter bikes. if youre trashing your road bike that much, i think you need a better mechanic or stop using it for observed trials.

    as clydes, many of us can hammer in a big gear(not really me). as clydes many of us cant climb as well as marco pantani and need a bail out gear (me included). a fixie is the worst of both worlds, youre out-spinning your arse on the flats or dying on anything resembling a real hill. if youre telling me youre fine climbing on your 50x14, im going to stand back as your knees explode. i rode 46x17, but i was as slow as bureaucracy and ONLY used it in town as a bar, quick errand bike. a 48x16 is a poor compromise. jmo

    ive always said a guy needs at least 3 speeds minimum, slow, med, fast

    heres the "i know people line" so take it for what its worth. i know a sizable number of messengers, ex-messengers, that all ride gears now that their lifestyle doesnt demand they ride fixed. lifestyle meaning, ease of maintainance, needing to look the part, mesenger subculture, winter durability and it was funny watching thieves try and ride off on a stolen fixed gear and watching them the eat the pavement really hard.

    i would strongly recommend against getting a fixie for your first bike. as strongly as the others argue in favor of getting one. i could never kickstop well in spds and ive never been paid to do a tag, so it might just be buried resentment, but i doubt it.

  21. #21
    brain damaged bovine muccapazza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    back on the dental floss ranch, wielding zircon encrusted tweezers
    My Bikes
    Schwinn wrecked ol' Probe 1x2, 84 Bianchi Limited,Cannondale F400,Raleigh 20 folder,78 Schwinn LeTour III Fixed Gear,Redline Conquest Pro,71-73 Gitane TdF,Gitane Grand Sport de Luxe,78 Raleigh Super Course,80 Schwinn World Sport
    Posts
    625
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by grimace308 View Post
    totally cool, well agree to disagree. fixies are, as one poster put it, a special breed in the stable, not the only horse in the corral. here are my opinions, so procced to salt the fries.

    it is a rough first weeks learning curve, very rough for some and sadly too rough for one or two. for you non-brake usin' purists, what happens when your clydesdale self, snaps his chain during a kickstop?

    honestly, do you get dropped by your roadie/hybrid friends on road rides? (youre only lying to yourself) would you want to ride with a guy on a fixie, when youre on a roadie?

    they are fine training bikes. they are great winter bikes. if youre trashing your road bike that much, i think you need a better mechanic or stop using it for observed trials.

    as clydes, many of us can hammer in a big gear(not really me). as clydes many of us cant climb as well as marco pantani and need a bail out gear (me included). a fixie is the worst of both worlds, youre out-spinning your arse on the flats or dying on anything resembling a real hill. if youre telling me youre fine climbing on your 50x14, im going to stand back as your knees explode. i rode 46x17, but i was as slow as bureaucracy and ONLY used it in town as a bar, quick errand bike. a 48x16 is a poor compromise. jmo

    ive always said a guy needs at least 3 speeds minimum, slow, med, fast

    heres the "i know people line" so take it for what its worth. i know a sizable number of messengers, ex-messengers, that all ride gears now that their lifestyle doesnt demand they ride fixed. lifestyle meaning, ease of maintainance, needing to look the part, mesenger subculture, winter durability and it was funny watching thieves try and ride off on a stolen fixed gear and watching them the eat the pavement really hard.

    i would strongly recommend against getting a fixie for your first bike. as strongly as the others argue in favor of getting one. i could never kickstop well in spds and ive never been paid to do a tag, so it might just be buried resentment, but i doubt it.
    The OP mentioned he would add a rear brake in addition to the included front, so skidding/kick stopping ain't an issue. Need at least three speeds? With fixed gear you have unlimited speeds, from 1 rpm up to 150 rpm plus. Want to go slower? pedal slower. Want to go faster? Pedal faster. Going uphill? Pedal harder. 48x16 isn't a good gear, too big. 42x16 42x17 puts you in the 72, 68 gear inch range and I and many others find it to offer perfect compromise. I rode that gear exclusively back when I was commuting some pretty long miles (28 miles one way), was able to cruise at around 18 mph average pretty easily, with a couple of downhills where I hit 32 mph. To the OP, if you want to, I say no reason not to. Just be attentive the first couple of weeks.

  22. #22
    crash 5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    mpls
    My Bikes
    90s? serotta t-max, 09' planet x ti frame w/sram force, '10 Bianchi Volpe
    Posts
    262
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    didnt see the part about the brakes with the op, but im sure he isnt the only one reading these threads, point taken though.

    yeah, i rode fixed for long enough to know that it isnt as easy as "just pedaling harder" when going uphill. if that was the case, the best climbers would be weight lifters who can squat 800lbs, not little pirates, who weigh less than an olympic female gymnast. yeah, im still a marco pantani fan.

    as you well know, there is a cadence + effort range, in which people are the most efficient climbing. below 60rpms, we tend to lose our form and start pushing squares (yes, i know fixies are easier to spin circles than freewheeling bikes). what happens when dude hits 20rpms and his heart rate goes over max and he blows up? im not a big fan of walking my bike up climbs, and will do ANYTHING possible to avoid it, im going out on a limb and assuming no one here likes to walk climbs. i kind of like to kill myself on the last part of climbs, knowing i can freewheel a bit on the backside to recover.

    while you have the ability to run 1-180rpms, i doubt an uber, whos been off the saddle a while, wants to have more of a selection than one gear. the fact that his 300lbs is taking about 20% more power to climb than my 240lbs, (took it off a watt calculator web page, i dont know the math) is even more of a reason to give the guy some gears.

    do you ride your fixie with the roadies? can you keep up with the roadies pus...spinning a 42x17? while popular opinion means next to nothing, on a forum dedicated to one thing, ill grant popular opinion more weight. id like to know how many people here ride fixed gear bikes becasue they prefer them, not for convenience or spin training? btw, this argument of for both fixies and singles.

    we will agree to disagree. i will close this by saying that if fixed gear bikes are the end all, why dont they still race them in the tdf? its nice to have at least a few gearing options over varying terrain.

  23. #23
    circus bear ban guzzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Austin
    My Bikes
    97(?) GT Richochet, 00 Schwinn SuperSport
    Posts
    642
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OP:
    I am 275 lbs, I rode a bit over 6000 miles last year, at least half on my fixed Panasonic geared 48/17 ~ 76.2 inches. I have some hills but nothing like Clifton, so I have a higher gear even with all my stuff.tools,clothes and lock for work. Grimace has his opinion but being a big guy with experiance commuting, I'd say enjoy yourself.

    Once you get used to always pedaling, you'll notice how much stronger and long winded you are. Does great things for your legs! Pick your gearing carefully (68-72 to start) and enjoy the hell out of it!
    Car Free Life.
    Riding without a brake is like saying that you trust traffic. ~ jonestr

  24. #24
    brain damaged bovine muccapazza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    back on the dental floss ranch, wielding zircon encrusted tweezers
    My Bikes
    Schwinn wrecked ol' Probe 1x2, 84 Bianchi Limited,Cannondale F400,Raleigh 20 folder,78 Schwinn LeTour III Fixed Gear,Redline Conquest Pro,71-73 Gitane TdF,Gitane Grand Sport de Luxe,78 Raleigh Super Course,80 Schwinn World Sport
    Posts
    625
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1. Have fun (the first "F" of Sheldon Brown's 5 fixed gear pillars http://sheldonbrown.com/fixed.html the others are form, fitness, feel, and 'feciancy)

  25. #25
    Senior Member Wavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    238
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The naysayers have posted a lot of BS in this thread.

    Why riders with zero fixie experience offer their clueless opinions is one of those annoying enigmas...

    Fixies don't hurt knees unless you do something stupid -- which can be done on any bike.

    Fixies don't wear out parts faster than geared bikes, unless the parts are crap to begin with.

    Took me one ride to get used to no coasting. One. Make sure your first time out is with flat pedals.

    Yes descents on a fixed are exciting. The most exciting part of any ride.
    "Coasting is a pernicious habit." - Sheldon Brown

    EVERY fixed rider I know with a flip-flop hub NEVER uses the freewheel side. Never.
    They all said not to waste the money for a flip flop.
    If it's your first bike and it comes with a flip-flop, go for it and try BOTH to see what YOU prefer.

    Yes, on the 12% grade climb back from town I have to get off and push. So what? Most of the mountain bikers get off and push too -- and they have triples.

    More advantages -- fewer parts to clean after a rain. Super simple to set up. Cleaner look.
    Ego boost when those riding corn cobs check out your bike.

    My only bike is fixed -- 42x16. Two brakes for descending that 12% grade. Had it for many years... long before fixies were trendy. Had to go into Toronto to have mine built because none of the local shops knew what fixed was. Now pretty much every shop has one fixie in stock.

    Someday I'll get a Winterborne Custom cyclocross so I can go on trails and have a shorter wheelbase to fit on my rollers... not because I need gears.

    My advice -- ignore the un-experienced opinions on this thread. Ride a fixed to see if you like it. If you do, buy one.
    Last edited by Wavy; 03-29-09 at 04:37 AM.
    “Next time you're in your car, at 80 Kilometers per hour, strip down to your underwear and jump out. That's what it's like to crash in a professional bike race.” - Jonathan Vaughters

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •