Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 101 to 103 of 103
  1. #101
    HAMMER DOWN SSBully's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dirty Jerzee
    My Bikes
    Sold '08 Jamis Coda Comp, building a Leader 720TR. I know, let the hating begin!
    Posts
    142
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe View Post
    Now, me, I'm one of the 36 spoke people, but I make it as clear as I can that my focus is to build as trouble free wheel as I can by using a hand built wheel and tensioned by a master wheelsmith using as strong a rim as is available. If I spec a wheel for myself, it would stand up to racing on cobblestones, basically, like in the Paris-Roubaix. My wheel of personal choice is the Velocity Deep V in a 36 spoke setup.

    I've got 2 years now on this set of Deep V's and after the initial retension at 300 miles, haven't had to touch them, and I'm not easy on a bike. My focus is utter reliability, period.
    I just laced up a set of those for myself! 36h Velocity Deep V's to a set of Suzue ProMax SB's, DT Alloy nipples and Wheelsmith straight gauge spokes.
    Aaaaawwwww look at all of those cute gears and shifters and cables and derailleurs! Isn't that special! Overall it's a sweet bike! I do have one question though...........................Do they make them for men?

  2. #102
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
    My Bikes
    Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
    Posts
    6,942
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
    No problems mate. I think you got the point, loud and clear. I get the fealing that the whole discussion about wheel requirements is one of those situations where people end up arguing toward the same ends. We're all in agreement that there are many things to consider in the correct choice for a rider. Possibly, too many to cover on an internet forum(I intentionally left out my maintenance and life expectancy considerations). See my suggestion above about you and Bully or others, authoring a "Clyde Wheels" article. It seems to come up a lot.
    What becomes an issue, for me at least, is the concept that once one pass the 91kg mark, that the only possible wheel option is a 36 spoke wheel, so new to the idea of riding folks, who are clydes get this idea that if they want a bicycle, they have to immediately spend another $500 on a set of bomb proof wheels. Not because they really need them, but because they are above the magic number. Lots of riders below 91kg break spokes too.

    My final statement on wheels for Clydes, if your bike comes with a lower spoke count wheel, make sure the wheels are properly trued and tensioned, the heavier the load and the fewer the spokes the more critical this is. If you get a new bike, the wheels need to be tensioned and trued as part of the setup. They need to be tensioned and trued before you reach the 500km mark, everything else needs to be checked as well. If you still have trouble with a wheel, then you need a higher spoke count wheel.

    Ride technique has a lot to do with it, unloading the sadde by lifting your butt off the saddle on broken road surfaces. Going around pot holes, maintenance covers, drains, etc or unloading the saddle when you can't can mean the difference between needing a heavier duty wheel and not.

    Bikes used for off road and touring should come with heavier duty wheels from the start, whether the rider weighs 90kg or 180kg.

  3. #103
    Mike the Bike
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Southern CA
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR C3/Gary Fisher Tasjahara
    Posts
    190
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wogsterca View Post
    Ride technique has a lot to do with it, unloading the sadde by lifting your butt off the saddle on broken road surfaces. Going around pot holes, maintenance covers, drains, etc or unloading the saddle when you can't can mean the difference between needing a heavier duty wheel and not.

    Bikes used for off road and touring should come with heavier duty wheels from the start, whether the rider weighs 90kg or 180kg.
    Ok, I'm 113kg (250lbs) I'm riding a Giant OCR C3 with 20 spoke wheels and have yet to break one after 1500 miles on the bike. My previous bike went 80k miles on a set of Phil Wood hubs with Mavic A217 rims and 32 spokes. This bike was used for Cyclocross as well as very long distance touring and a bit of Mountain biking to tweak noses now and then. Technique is VERY important.
    Last edited by d4c4c8; 06-03-09 at 07:28 PM. Reason: Woops, miscount!

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •