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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 05-12-09, 06:55 PM   #1
horaceunit
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Rear Wheel Problems

I'll try to make this as short as I can. A little background: I have a Trek 7100 Hybrid that I have had for about 4 years. I am 6 foot and about 285- hence the reason for my starting to commute with the bike. Can't really jog any more- kills my knees, and dieting doesn't help much without the excercise. My problem is that I am blowing spokes out on the rear wheel. I had the original wheel replaced (32 hole) with a 36 spoke wheel, but I just found another broken spoke on that one today- about 10 rides on the new wheel. I have heard that a 42 or 48 spoke wheel from a tandem would be a good idea, but none of my LBS seem to be able to find one that will fit my bike. Besides any other advice anyone has- does anyone have any good online sources for wheels? My main problem is that to build one most places want a lot of money (I have been quoted as high as $600.00) so I am willing to try and do it myself if I can find the right parts. I'm sure I'll have more questions, and thanks in advance on any help anyone has!
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Old 05-12-09, 07:23 PM   #2
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A Handbuilt Velocity Dyad wheel. 36-40 spokes. Use DT Swiss spokes or Wheelsmith.
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Old 05-12-09, 07:24 PM   #3
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I'm only about 10 pounds lighter than you and have been riding 36 spoke wheels for over 25 years. You shouldn't be having such problems on a quality built wheel after only 10 rides, if they aren't that long a ride. What wheel components are you currently using? Rim, hub, spoke size, pattern, etc.? Who was it from? Or, who built it? There's no reason why a well built and maintain 36 spoke wheel shouldn't work really well for you. Talk to the builder or manufacturer of the wheel. Hopefully, they will treat you well and help get this sorted. Delaware isn't the dark side of the moon, so, surely there's a reputable wheelsmith somewhere in the area. A lot of us have had very good luck using Shimano Ultegra hubs laced, 3 cross with 36, 14 ga. spokes to any number of qulity rims(popular choices being Mavic Open Pro CD's or Velocity Deep V's). Properly built, stress relieved and retensioned after breaking in, they should last a long time for someone your size and weight.

If you decide to go the tandem equiment route. You have a much better chance of finding 40 spoke components, then 42 or 48.

Best of luck in finding a workable solution. But, really, find a good wheelsmith in your area or learn to do it yourself. There's no excuse why quality 36 spoke wheels shouldn't work for you.
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Old 05-12-09, 08:18 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horaceunit View Post
I'll try to make this as short as I can. A little background: I have a Trek 7100 Hybrid that I have had for about 4 years. I am 6 foot and about 285- hence the reason for my starting to commute with the bike. Can't really jog any more- kills my knees, and dieting doesn't help much without the excercise. My problem is that I am blowing spokes out on the rear wheel. I had the original wheel replaced (32 hole) with a 36 spoke wheel, but I just found another broken spoke on that one today- about 10 rides on the new wheel. I have heard that a 42 or 48 spoke wheel from a tandem would be a good idea, but none of my LBS seem to be able to find one that will fit my bike. Besides any other advice anyone has- does anyone have any good online sources for wheels? My main problem is that to build one most places want a lot of money (I have been quoted as high as $600.00) so I am willing to try and do it myself if I can find the right parts. I'm sure I'll have more questions, and thanks in advance on any help anyone has!
Get the shop that built the new wheel to replace the spoke and this time properly true and tension the wheel.
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Old 05-12-09, 09:14 PM   #5
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Heavy duty wheels with thicker spokes, perhaps? You can get them for single speed coaster bikes and utility work bikes, I'm wondering if the wheels can be built with a geared bike....
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Old 05-12-09, 10:35 PM   #6
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i've been MTBing on well built 36h wheelset and weigh 30# on you... no problems... I did however manage to kill some some spokes on my redline on my last road ride (62 miles on tour de cure)... but I think that has to do with me landing a jump (being a jackarse laughing at the skinny tire buddies haha) also could have to do with the fact it's factory built wheels...

could have it rebuilt with decent spokes, hand built, proper tension ect... also a bit wider tires would cushion the ride a bit and posibly help the spokes live a bit longer
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Old 05-13-09, 12:10 AM   #7
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There are some good choices here.

http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com...ewCat&catId=18

Also Universalcycles.com can hand build a solid set of 36 spoke wheels for you for under 300 depending on options. I am going to get a set of Mavic A719 touring rims built up for my bike from them. If you call them and tell them your stats they will make solid suggestions.
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Old 05-13-09, 05:02 AM   #8
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bigfred's right. 36 spoke wheels should do you fine. Get the wheels from a different builder.

Snapping spokes is because of twisting at the hub. So either you're putting out power the rest of us can only dream about, or the spokes were never tight enough to begin with. Get a different shop/builder.
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Old 05-13-09, 09:35 AM   #9
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Hve you laid the bike over on a crash with the new wheel ?
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Old 05-13-09, 11:13 AM   #10
horaceunit
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Rear Wheel

No, no crashes, and I have tried hard not to run over anything and miss even small depressions in the road. I picked up the bike from the LBS on Friday the 8th. The shop is closed Tues & Wed so I will be taking it back tomorrow to have them look at it. I just ordered a Spin Doctor truing stand and spoke wrenches, so I can learn how to do some of this myself. I really want to get a new bike, but I made a deal with my wife that if I can loose 50 lbs I can seriously look at a new one, so I got to get out there and start logging some miles!!!! Thanks to all for your help!
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Old 05-13-09, 11:30 AM   #11
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I'm not having any trouble with a 30y.o. factory wheel, and I'm 330. Avoid the pot-holes, careful off the curbs, work with the bumps rather than against them, and no mashing.

Serious, don't get your butt out of the saddle unless you want to pringle your wheel or snap your chain (Mr. Frame? Meet Mr. Crotch.) It's OK going up hills, sorta, but from a stop or a slow roll, or into a full sprint, you're asking for it. One of the "advantages" of being big is massive leg strength. Let your muscles, not gravity, supply the torque.

On the other hand, if you're going over a curb or bump, be sure to let your legs take most of your weight... an aware rider makes a better shock absorber than even the priciest component manufacturer.
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