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  1. #1
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    Are these the types of wheels I should buy??

    Vuelta deep V's

    I asked him in email to verify they are 700s.

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    Senior Member theetruscan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechKnowGN View Post
    Vuelta deep V's

    I asked him in email to verify they are 700s.
    Are you riding a singlespeed now? Those are singlespeed wheels. They're also NMSW which means weaker braking force than normal machined side walls.

    You most likely want Velocity Deep V rims (deeper profile doesn't necessarily mean stronger wheel) with 36 holes and double butted spokes (not DT revolution, CX-Ray, or other super race spokes, just basic double butted spokes), laced to a hub with a freewheel corresponding to the brand of shifters you have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theetruscan View Post
    Are you riding a singlespeed now? Those are singlespeed wheels. They're also NMSW which means weaker braking force than normal machined side walls.

    You most likely want Velocity Deep V rims (deeper profile doesn't necessarily mean stronger wheel) with 36 holes and double butted spokes (not DT revolution, CX-Ray, or other super race spokes, just basic double butted spokes), laced to a hub with a freewheel corresponding to the brand of shifters you have.

    Ahh... didn't know they were singlespeed. I am really dumb at wheels. Even with all the info I've been asking for. LOL.

    How about these?

    Vuelta Corsa

  4. #4
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    We also need to know if you bike has 130mm rear wheel spacing (at the axle) like most road bikes. Or, do you have 135mm spacing like most hybrids and mountain bikes? If you bike is older, you could have something else all-together.

    Michael
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    Bike is 2008 Fuji Absolute 4.0 w/ 7 speed Shimano.

    It's a Hybrid, but I don't know how to tell you which spacing it has. That's something i haven't seen in the online stats for either this or last years model.

    Quote Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
    We also need to know if you bike has 130mm rear wheel spacing (at the axle) like most road bikes. Or, do you have 135mm spacing like most hybrids and mountain bikes? If you bike is older, you could have something else all-together.

    Michael

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    Senior Member theetruscan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechKnowGN View Post
    Bike is 2008 Fuji Absolute 4.0 w/ 7 speed Shimano.

    It's a Hybrid, but I don't know how to tell you which spacing it has. That's something i haven't seen in the online stats for either this or last years model.
    I'm going to guess it's 135 mm spacing on account of having mountain bike everything.

    I'm not sure why you're hunting around for Vuelta rims either, it seems like you're having wheel troubles and the savings of going with something clydes are unfamiliar with are unlikely to pan out. Get a handbuilt set of wheels so someone competent is checking your tension. Get 36 spokes, double butted for elasticity. You'll pay (with cheap hubs which are fine), probably less than $300/$350 and get a known sturdy pair of wheels.

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    That's the problem. $300/$350 is WAY out of the question until late september and I dont want to get to the point where I can't ride because my current wheels are done. I have a Triathlon in a month, so I need something cheaper but strong. I was looking at the Vuelta because they are on ebay and a LOT closer to my pricepoint, plus they mention being Shimano 7 Speed compatible and rated for up to 300#. I'm a little over that, but I'm sure not so far that it would matter.

    Quote Originally Posted by theetruscan View Post
    I'm going to guess it's 135 mm spacing on account of having mountain bike everything.

    I'm not sure why you're hunting around for Vuelta rims either, it seems like you're having wheel troubles and the savings of going with something clydes are unfamiliar with are unlikely to pan out. Get a handbuilt set of wheels so someone competent is checking your tension. Get 36 spokes, double butted for elasticity. You'll pay (with cheap hubs which are fine), probably less than $300/$350 and get a known sturdy pair of wheels.

  8. #8
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Do both wheels need replacing? Heavier riders often need a stronger rear wheel, The front wheel is often OK. You can get a servicable new rear wheel for less than $100 easily.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
    Do both wheels need replacing? Heavier riders often need a stronger rear wheel, The front wheel is often OK. You can get a servicable new rear wheel for less than $100 easily.

    Front wheel hasn't really been any trouble. It's all the rear. What do I do to get just the rear. I looked at what they had on the shelf at Performance Bike and wasn't impressed. Do I just try the local shops?

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    Senior Member theetruscan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechKnowGN View Post
    That's the problem. $300/$350 is WAY out of the question until late september and I dont want to get to the point where I can't ride because my current wheels are done. I have a Triathlon in a month, so I need something cheaper but strong. I was looking at the Vuelta because they are on ebay and a LOT closer to my pricepoint, plus they mention being Shimano 7 Speed compatible and rated for up to 300#. I'm a little over that, but I'm sure not so far that it would matter.
    Then, like Barrett says, get one wheel now (rear). Also, haven't people mentioned in one of your other wheel threads that you can add a spacer for shimano 8/9 to fit shimano 7?

    A spacer is going to run you $3 to $4 max. I'd just hate to see you spend $170 on wheels that only last you a few months. For probably less than $200, you can get a handbuilt (locally made for retensioning after 300 miles) known-strong rear wheel that fits your needs. I just think hunting around ebay for something that "looks right" is not as good an idea as getting what you know works.

    EDIT: Specced out a wheel for you on prowheelbuilder.com just to get an idea. Shimano LX hub, Velocity Deep V rim, Brass nipples, DT Swiss double butted spokes (14/15/14). Total came in at $148 + shipping. Upgrading to an XT hub (the quality you'd basically never need to upgrade) adds $35 to that, though to be fair I'm not sure there's much difference between LX and XT.

    EDIT2: I screwed up and specced that with black spokes. silver spokes save you around $10. And, just for the hell of it, I specced a pair of wheels. LX hubs front and back, velocity deep vs front and back, doublebutted spokes front and back, brass nipples. $136 rear, $121 front, set for $257.
    Last edited by theetruscan; 05-27-09 at 08:33 AM.

  11. #11
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    You make a good point. And I don't like throwing good money after bad. Just with the wedding and the move to Boston, I can realistically expect no more than $100 go to this effort. (The "finance committe" actually mentioned last night that isn't this why I bought a better bike, and now i need to replace parts of it? LOL)

    The spacer was mentioned, and I saw the price on those online just before your response. The wheels I listed are 7/8/9/10 compatible, with the 7 requiring the spacer.

    I'll have to ask around to see who builds wheels and what it would cost for just a rear. I know a guy at the co-op who builds them, but I don't know if he's good. So I'll ask to see who is good, and what it'd cost.

    Quote Originally Posted by theetruscan View Post
    Then, like Barrett says, get one wheel now (rear). Also, haven't people mentioned in one of your other wheel threads that you can add a spacer for shimano 8/9 to fit shimano 7?

    A spacer is going to run you $3 to $4 max. I'd just hate to see you spend $170 on wheels that only last you a few months. For probably less than $200, you can get a handbuilt (locally made for retensioning after 300 miles) known-strong rear wheel that fits your needs. I just think hunting around ebay for something that "looks right" is not as good an idea as getting what you know works.

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    go to a local bike shop and see if you can find an older used wheel, 32x spokes 3 cross, and a quality hub (most likely a deore or better) and a double walled rim. you should be able to pick one up fairly cheaply, or get a lbs to build one cheap.

    if having one built from scratch, deore hub to a sun cr-18 should be a good, economical choice, allowing a variety of tire sizes to be used (from 25c to 40c). also consider the salsa delgado cross rim for a little more weight savings, at a higher price. since you are riding a hybrid, i would avoid the mavic cxp-33 and open pro, as well as the velocity deep-v, because they are designed around using narrow racing tires. it will be fairly light, and if you want to save weight for some reason, you can go with a lighter hub, LX or XT for a little more coin. I have had the cr-18 or its equivalent on mountain bikes, and always been pleased. friends use them on fixed gears hopping curbs and pogoing, and they are very strong. same with the delgado cross rims (will be on my cross/commuter bike when i get it built).

  13. #13
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Contact these nice folks and ask if you can just buy a rear wheel: http://harriscyclery.net/itemdetails.cfm?ID=2469

    They state that a 7 speed cassette will work with a spacer. Ask them about this, too.

    Edit: I found these: http://cgi.ebay.com/09-Shimano-XT-36...3A1%7C294%3A50

    I have two sets of wheels from these folks, including ones like these. These are very strong, will take a 7 speed and should auction at about $120 or less for the set.

    Michael
    Last edited by Barrettscv; 05-27-09 at 08:38 AM.
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  14. #14
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    The stock wheels on the Absolute 4.0 are Alex Z1000 36h laced with 2.0mm straight gauge spokes. What's the problem you're having with this wheelset? Is it breaking spokes? If that's the case, a new pair of machine built wheels isn't going to solve anything in the long run. They'll be a stop-gap measure until they too, start breaking spokes from uneven tension. (For reference, everything off-the-peg at Performance is machine built.)

    Here's my suggestion, and I've built or retensioned all the wheels I use on my road bikes:

    Have an LBS with a reputable wheelsmith rebuild the current wheels. Make certain that they don't just replace any broken spokes, but that they fully detension all of them, replace any broken ones, and then retension and retrue the wheel. Be certain that they're unstressing the spokes with each round of adjustments.
    When you take a first ride on a properly handbuilt/hand tensioned and unstressed wheel, you should hear a minimal amount of "pinging" from the spokes; like one or two little sounds and that's it. They should, for the most part, be settled in place and not twisted (wound up) from the truing process. If it sounds like an out of tune music box when you give it a first ride around the parking lot, it wasn't done right.

    I rode a pair of Alex DA16 rims into the ground. Quite literally, the rear rim didn't come off my bike until the sidewall was worn so thin from brake grinding that it started to bow outward at the bead. Even so, a 32h rim with a 250 pound guy hammering on it for commuting and long distance lasted for over 5000 miles before needing replaced, and I only has to true it once.
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    Senior Member theetruscan's Avatar
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    I added a fair bit to my response above.

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    I havent broken a single spoke, so far as I can tell (Im assuming a broken spoke is quite obvious). They just seem to come out of true even on rides as short as 6 1/2 miles. Or maybe I don't know what I'm talking about.

    What I do know is that coming into the parking lot at the end of my ride, leaning on the turn just a bit, I heard noises from the rear wheel clearly rubbing the pads harshly. It wasn't doing that at the beginning of the ride, and I had no big bumps or curbs or anything.

    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    The stock wheels on the Absolute 4.0 are Alex Z1000 36h laced with 2.0mm straight gauge spokes. What's the problem you're having with this wheelset? Is it breaking spokes? If that's the case, a new pair of machine built wheels isn't going to solve anything in the long run. They'll be a stop-gap measure until they too, start breaking spokes from uneven tension. (For reference, everything off-the-peg at Performance is machine built.)

    Here's my suggestion, and I've built or retensioned all the wheels I use on my road bikes:

    Have an LBS with a reputable wheelsmith rebuild the current wheels. Make certain that they don't just replace any broken spokes, but that they fully detension all of them, replace any broken ones, and then retension and retrue the wheel. Be certain that they're unstressing the spokes with each round of adjustments.
    When you take a first ride on a properly handbuilt/hand tensioned and unstressed wheel, you should hear a minimal amount of "pinging" from the spokes; like one or two little sounds and that's it. They should, for the most part, be settled in place and not twisted (wound up) from the truing process. If it sounds like an out of tune music box when you give it a first ride around the parking lot, it wasn't done right.

    I rode a pair of Alex DA16 rims into the ground. Quite literally, the rear rim didn't come off my bike until the sidewall was worn so thin from brake grinding that it started to bow outward at the bead. Even so, a 32h rim with a 250 pound guy hammering on it for commuting and long distance lasted for over 5000 miles before needing replaced, and I only has to true it once.

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    If the auction somehow manages to finish in the range where it's $100 with shipping, then yeah, thats possible, but I just dont see that as likely. But I'll keep an eye on it. The budget is just really seriously restricted.

    Quote Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
    Contact these nice folks and ask if you can just buy a rear wheel: http://harriscyclery.net/itemdetails.cfm?ID=2469

    They state that a 7 speed cassette will work with a spacer. Ask them about this, too.

    Edit: I found these: http://cgi.ebay.com/09-Shimano-XT-36...3A1%7C294%3A50

    I have two sets of wheels from these folks, including ones like these. These are very strong, will take a 7 speed and should auction at about $120 or less for the set.

    Michael

  18. #18
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechKnowGN View Post
    I havent broken a single spoke, so far as I can tell (Im assuming a broken spoke is quite obvious). They just seem to come out of true even on rides as short as 6 1/2 miles. Or maybe I don't know what I'm talking about.

    What I do know is that coming into the parking lot at the end of my ride, leaning on the turn just a bit, I heard noises from the rear wheel clearly rubbing the pads harshly. It wasn't doing that at the beginning of the ride, and I had no big bumps or curbs or anything.
    It sounds to me like the issue is low/uneven tension leading to the wheel being able to flex. Eventually that leads to broken spokes.
    I still suggest bringing the wheel to your LBS and having them loosen everything up then retension and true the wheel. Talk to the wheelsmith and make sure that they understand what your issue is currently. I usually build my wheels at a slightly higher spoke tension that what you find on lighter guys' bikes, because I know what kind of hurt I can put on a wheel, especially if I'm out of the saddle and climbing.
    A re-tension/true shouldn't cost you more than $30. (Just lower than the avg. labour cost around here for a wheelbuild.)
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    It sounds to me like the issue is low/uneven tension leading to the wheel being able to flex. Eventually that leads to broken spokes.
    I still suggest bringing the wheel to your LBS and having them loosen everything up then retension and true the wheel. Talk to the wheelsmith and make sure that they understand what your issue is currently. I usually build my wheels at a slightly higher spoke tension that what you find on lighter guys' bikes, because I know what kind of hurt I can put on a wheel, especially if I'm out of the saddle and climbing.
    A re-tension/true shouldn't cost you more than $30. (Just lower than the avg. labour cost around here for a wheelbuild.)
    That sounds like a good idea. I'll find out the right place to take it and have them do that. I'll have that done this weekend while I'm in Boston, and come back to a nice wheel on tuesday.

  20. #20
    Senior Member racethenation's Avatar
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    The cheapest solution to this in my opinion would be to take your rear wheel to a good wheel builder and have them use your existing hub and build a new wheel with a Velocity Deep V rim and new spokes. I had this done last year for a total cost of about $90. This is within your $100 budget and will give you a solid wheel without having to change any hardware or worry about spacers.

  21. #21
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by racethenation View Post
    The cheapest solution to this in my opinion would be to take your rear wheel to a good wheel builder and have them use your existing hub and build a new wheel with a Velocity Deep V rim and new spokes. I had this done last year for a total cost of about $90. This is within your $100 budget and will give you a solid wheel without having to change any hardware or worry about spacers.
    If he's not breaking spokes and the current rim is in good condition, why bother to replace it all?
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  22. #22
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    Called a few places, all recommended the same one. Funny, I actually know a guy that works at the shop from the Co-op. So off to Baer Wheels it is. Drop off tonight, pick up friday. Might get to haul the bike out to Boston with me for rides at the campground.

    And he said generally around $20 for a retension/true.
    Last edited by TechKnowGN; 05-27-09 at 09:55 AM.

  23. #23
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    If he's not breaking spokes and the current rim is in good condition, why bother to replace it all?
    I agree that a good quality true and tension is the right solution. To answer you question, the OP asked for advice as to the kind of wheels he should buy.

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  24. #24
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    The stock wheels on the Absolute 4.0 are Alex Z1000 36h laced with 2.0mm straight gauge spokes. What's the problem you're having with this wheelset? Is it breaking spokes? If that's the case, a new pair of machine built wheels isn't going to solve anything in the long run. They'll be a stop-gap measure until they too, start breaking spokes from uneven tension. (For reference, everything off-the-peg at Performance is machine built.)

    Here's my suggestion, and I've built or retensioned all the wheels I use on my road bikes:

    Have an LBS with a reputable wheelsmith rebuild the current wheels. Make certain that they don't just replace any broken spokes, but that they fully detension all of them, replace any broken ones, and then retension and retrue the wheel. Be certain that they're unstressing the spokes with each round of adjustments.
    When you take a first ride on a properly handbuilt/hand tensioned and unstressed wheel, you should hear a minimal amount of "pinging" from the spokes; like one or two little sounds and that's it. They should, for the most part, be settled in place and not twisted (wound up) from the truing process. If it sounds like an out of tune music box when you give it a first ride around the parking lot, it wasn't done right.

    I rode a pair of Alex DA16 rims into the ground. Quite literally, the rear rim didn't come off my bike until the sidewall was worn so thin from brake grinding that it started to bow outward at the bead. Even so, a 32h rim with a 250 pound guy hammering on it for commuting and long distance lasted for over 5000 miles before needing replaced, and I only has to true it once.
    If he has broken at least one spoke, then would it not be best to rebuild the wheel with all new spokes? Spokes are relatively inexpensive, and if going through all the work of re-tensioning, re-truing, then even at $1 a spoke, it would be cheap insurance to make sure that the wheel will last as long as possible.

    If no broken spokes, then yeah, re-tension & re-true.

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