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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 06-07-09, 01:25 PM   #1
yrrej
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This is not working like I thought it would...

Hi,

Well I am 2 months away from my 71st B'day and I bought a bike last Nov 08.

It is a heavyish Sequoia Comp ( about 24 pounds ).

Early May I weighed in at 202 ( stark naked ) and I know the scale reads a bit low...

I have been riding a couple of 20 mile and 10 mile circuits every other day ( unless
it is raining). ( Thats one circuit per day .

I know my overall strength is steadily increasing along with my speed. Today I
averaged over 17 mph for the first 10 miles and finished with a 15 mph average
over the 20 mile circuit ( Yes the first 10 miles is a bit easier than the second
10 miles ).

After my morning ride today my weigh-in was 205...I am gaining weight

I thought that biking would be the way to drop some weight

Jerry

Last edited by yrrej; 06-07-09 at 02:44 PM. Reason: Doh, It is a 'Comp' not an 'Elite'
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Old 06-07-09, 02:00 PM   #2
Rob_U
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Well, the big loaded question here is - what has your diet been? Cycling will certainly help, but you do have to reduce calories, points, carbs, or modify your diet in some way. Exercise is more of a weight loss "booster" - sometimes you can lose a few pounds with just exercise, but that depends on the individual, and what your intake has been. I lost six pounds over a summer of hard riding, but when I changed my diet, the weight really started to come off.

Last edited by Rob_U; 06-07-09 at 02:05 PM.
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Old 06-07-09, 02:03 PM   #3
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Are you carrying more muscle now? Have you lost any inches. Sometimes a slight weight gain is a good thing!
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Old 06-07-09, 02:24 PM   #4
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I have tons of recent experience with this phenomenon. In 2007 I weighed 240 lbs and had some other health issues. At that time I could only ride <20 miles per trip 2X per week. Since then I have put several thousand miles behind me but my weight pretty much stayed the same for most of that year. I am 6'6" tall, slender build, and a non smoker/drinker. I had a 36" waist that was working hard on trying to be a 38" waist and a potbelly that would make a pregnant woman proud.

In the summer of 2008 I weighed 235 lbs. My average ride was 30+ miles 3-4 times per week. I watched my diet, cut back SERIOUSLY on my daily caloric intake and my weight either stayed the same or crept up 5 lbs per week and then back down the next.

It is now the beginning of summer 2009 and I'm STILL not happy with my weight. I currently weigh 220-225 lbs, ride 40-50 miles per ride, 3X per week and am still watching my calories. I do not eat "junk food" at all anymore although I will still sometimes have a moderate portion of dessert. My avg calorie intake per day is around 2000-2200.

While my weight has not changed that much, my physical shape HAS changed. I have less of a fat pad on my stomach. My fat rolls on my sides/back are smaller as well. My legs are showing muscle development without any increase in size. My calves are amazing in their muscle definition. I'm still fat and I still know that I have a ways to go to get fit and lean again. My goal weight is 205-210 and I believe that I will get there this year.

So, based on what I've been through as a personal experience, your weight may not start dropping off just because you are riding your bike. You can event watch your diet and still not lose weight. However, what you WILL lose is fat. It will be slow and will take a lot of dedication and in the meantime you will gain muscle mass. This may even increase your weight a bit at first. However, you will begin to lose weight and it will stay GONE if you continue to remember the lessons you will learn on the way (watch what you eat and exercise).

One other thing, your ride may have too many hills on it and this may increasing muscle in your legs before you burn off body fat. This could be one reason for your weight increase. Try flatter routes at moderate speeds and slightly longer distances if you can.
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Old 06-07-09, 03:00 PM   #5
yrrej
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My diet has not really changed the last three years or so... One thing that has changed
is the stress level in my life.

My wife's health issues are nearly overwhelming...dementia, probable parkinsons, ulcerative
colitis, auto-immune hemolytic anemia to mention the main show stoppers.

I have had to hire a helper so I can get some 'me time'.

I suspect that there is a age related aspect to weight loss. When I was younger I
could lose weight fairly quickly with a vigorous exercise program.

That no longer seems to be the case ;(

Jerry
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Old 06-07-09, 03:24 PM   #6
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Hmm, I've been kinda wondering the same sorta thing myself. Not so much the weight part (more about which in a sec) but the PAIN part....see, I've been having problems with the bars (numb hands thread) and my shoes are apparently too skinny in the toe box, after a while I get sausage toe sensation (could be diabetic neuropathy though, I have foot pain at work all the time too). Were it not for the hand and foot pain issues I could ride my bike a pretty long ways on the flats at least.

As for weight.....yes, riding will build up muscle and replace fat, muscle weighs more than fat for the same amount of mass, so you would gain slightly. 3 pounds....pshh, what's to worry about? If you're in better condition then the 3 pound weight gain is irrelevant.

Rob....at 6-6 I'd say 240 is a pretty good weight! Maybe not "stick man" but I've known a lot of football and basketball players of varying weights who were 6-5, 6-6 and 205# is definitely on the thin side of things (although one of my high school basketball teammates was 6-5 and about 160.....poor fella, we were always trying to stuff food down his throat. It worked. He gained five pounds his senior year. Still a pretty good ball player tho )

In my particular case...I've been off the bike most of the last several weeks due to the handlebar problem (permanent nerve damage is a good enough reason, I'd say), and I've lost FAR more weight due to just eating somewhere between very little and nothing at all the last 5 or 6 days. The frustrating part is that if I eat little enough to actually lose weight I have all kinds of problems....dizzy, dehydrated, pain levels spike, blood sugars go up and down (mostly down), I have the runs and in general I feel like hell. Eating resolves all those issues, but.....I don't lose any weight (or gain)

So frustrating!

Tom

Tom

Last edited by FZ1Tom; 06-07-09 at 03:28 PM.
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Old 06-07-09, 03:30 PM   #7
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Jerry, I suspect you're picking up muscle mass. That's a good kind of gain. You're also getting stress relief, that's a huge positive. You're getting you time, that's a third positive. Enjoy the positives and don't sweat the small stuff.
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Old 06-07-09, 03:55 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yrrej View Post
My diet has not really changed the last three years or so... One thing that has changed
is the stress level in my life.

My wife's health issues are nearly overwhelming...dementia, probable parkinsons, ulcerative
colitis, auto-immune hemolytic anemia to mention the main show stoppers.

I have had to hire a helper so I can get some 'me time'.

I suspect that there is a age related aspect to weight loss. When I was younger I
could lose weight fairly quickly with a vigorous exercise program.

That no longer seems to be the case ;(

Jerry
Jerry,

The role of caretaker is a stressful one and "me time" is critical if you want to make sure you are preserving your own mental and physical health. I have have known many people in your situation on both a personal and professional level. Keep getting that respite care, it is vital for everyone involved.

When asked why I cycle, or if people are talking about the health and weight loss benefits, I always state that I ride for mental health. Everything else is gravy.

I wish you the best of luck with your time on the bike and your time with your wife.

Keep on rollin'
Bill
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Old 06-07-09, 04:18 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe View Post
Jerry, I suspect you're picking up muscle mass. That's a good kind of gain. You're also getting stress relief, that's a huge positive. You're getting you time, that's a third positive. Enjoy the positives and don't sweat the small stuff.
This!

Tom nails it again.
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Old 06-07-09, 04:34 PM   #10
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Don't worry about your weight. Take care of your health and your weight will take care of itself.

Sounds like you are doing okay that front.

Best wishes for a happy birthday.
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Old 06-07-09, 07:20 PM   #11
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Two suggestions:

1) as others have noted, fat deposits may be replaced with lean muscle mass and/or redistributed to other areas. A MyoTape (available at health and nutrition stores and online) is a useful tool; in addition to weighing yourself, you can track changes in the measurements of body areas like the waist, chest, etc.

2) Track everything you eat; a kitchen scale and software like FitDay (Google it) is useful in this regard. It can help you determine what your metabolic "break even" point is - the number of calories per day required for you to just maintain current bodyweight, and the average daily intake that will produce weight loss. A shift of as little as 200 average calories per day can make the difference between maintaining or losing. It's easy to be way off when you try to guess or estimate your actual caloric intake.
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