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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 06-09-09, 08:36 PM   #1
TechKnowGN
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ARGH! This is why I dont take longer rides

Ok, so I've been gearing up for some longer rides, but I havent been able to get there, mostly because of a mental roadblock I've been having. I don't trust my equipment. I trust the frame, I trust the brakes, I trust the gears, etc. But I dont trust the rear wheel/tire.

So, I go and get the rear wheel tensioned/trued, and the bad boy seems all set. So I set out determined to see exactly how far I can go in an hour. I am rollin, big time. Get to the half hour time frame and turn around. I look and see where I am..... 7.5 miles!That's right, I'm on the point for 15 MPH average for an hour!

Then the thinkable (yes, it is the opposite of unthinkable) happens, I'm going hard, evidently too hard. I've been cornering nicely all day, leaning in a bit, keeping speed up through some nice round turns. Evidently, I took one of them too hard.... and.... I.... flatted. slowly, over the course of half a mile or so.

5+ miles from home, no spare tube, just got it, forgot to pack it. I call the fiancee, no answer. repeatedly. So I start walking. Get 2 miles to a gas station, fill er up with air. Gets me about 50 yards, before it's obviously deflating again. Keep walking. Finally 1.3 miles from home, fiancee wanders into the room where her cell phone is, and comes and gets me.

So, about the flat, I just had the wheel trued and tensioned, and I thought the pressure was fine before i rode, so the question, is it just that the tire can't hang with my weight? With the performance bike giftcard I got from my folks for my BDay, I had bought Forte Metro-K road tires. These have a kevlar belt, but I dont know that helps with with this kind of issue. Hell, I don't even know for sure that this is my issue. Anyone got any ideas?

As you can tell I'm frustrated. I only got in 9 miles today, and I had hoped for SO MUCH MORE!
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Old 06-09-09, 08:41 PM   #2
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That's what seatbags are for. Pack one with a spare tube, or two, and install a pump onto the bike. Then leave these items on the bike. Basic stuff. Some experience helps, so does listening.
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Old 06-09-09, 08:42 PM   #3
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3 words:
Gay-Tor-Skins
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Old 06-09-09, 08:52 PM   #4
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Flats happen. You probably rolled over something on the road or path. You should always carry your repair stuff.
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Old 06-09-09, 08:52 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosso Corsa View Post
3 words:
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Fixed it for ya.
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Old 06-09-09, 08:56 PM   #6
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Yeah, but its NEVER the front always the back. Where there's smoke, there's fire. Let's say I have the spare tube, whose to say this wouldnt happen again on the ride home. It has happened twice during 10 mile rides about the 9th mile going hard (once during a race, once today) I dont think I rode over anything. MUP, lots (I mean lots) of other cyclists around.

How do I know if it's a pinch flat when I look at it?
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Old 06-09-09, 09:04 PM   #7
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I had a flat on the front the other day, I seem to flat more in the front than the back. Only thing I can figure is it's a Bontrager tube that's been on the bike for more than a week.

I @!#!#@!#@ hate Bontrager tubes.

Anyway, I second the recommendation of taking a spare tube with. I don't mess around with patching anymore, that's my one luxury in life, I guess - LOL. Spare tube, nice Park Levers and a frame pump - you'll thank me later.
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Old 06-09-09, 09:08 PM   #8
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What size are the tires? What are you using for inflation pressure? How much do you weigh? You say you thought the tires pressure was find, but that sounds like a "rule of thumb" measurement. You should pump up the tires before every ride.
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Old 06-09-09, 09:18 PM   #9
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Back tire carries more weight than the front so it isn't unusual to flat more in the rear. Always carry a tube, patch kit, pump and tire irons (and a multi-tool isn't a bad idea either). You can go a thousand miles without a flat and then flat twice (or more) in one ride. All part of the fun. And you should make sure you are at full pressure (meaning you need a guage of some sort) before every ride.
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Old 06-09-09, 09:35 PM   #10
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I actually carry two spares and a flat repair kit
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Old 06-09-09, 09:37 PM   #11
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Flats are just a part of bike riding.. Sometimes you can ride months without a flat and then there are other times they come in waves.. Learn to be able fix a flat on the road.. When you get good at it, should take 5-10 minutes..

If you have a pinch flat, you will 2 small marks on the tube that look like a small snakebite.. For heavier riders pinch flats happen when you tire compresses and it bottoms out on the rim.. Make sure your tires are pumped up before each ride..
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Old 06-09-09, 10:17 PM   #12
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You may want to change your rim tape. Since it seem you are always getting you wheels trued. Also have you looked into where the flats are coming from. Mark your tire with the stem placement them pull the tube. Inflate the tube and submerge in water to see where the flat is coming from.
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Old 06-09-09, 10:28 PM   #13
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Make sure you have the right rim strip size. My personal preference is Velox cloth rim tape. Some preventable punctures are caused by burrs form spoke hole on the rim poking through cheap rim tape and causing the flat. Another thing is to use larger (volume) tires, preferably 25mm or 28mm if it fits on your bike and pump to recommended psi (again, I prefer 110psi - 120psi.
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Old 06-09-09, 11:46 PM   #14
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Well, any way you got a good workout with 9 miles of riding and 3 miles of walking.
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Old 06-09-09, 11:59 PM   #15
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If they're not pinch flats, make sure you're cleaning the offending debris out when fixing the flat. If you get a lot punctures, consider upgrading to a heavier tire.
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Old 06-10-09, 01:11 AM   #16
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Everyone gets flats, big or small no matter. Once you ride enough your front will flat and believe me when it does you will wish it was the rear. I've actually seen more rear than front flats, and have experienced more rear flats myself. I think sometimes it's a matter of seeing road debris and reacting quickly enough to get front out of way but not fast enough to get rear clear.
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Old 06-10-09, 02:05 AM   #17
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As mentioned before, proper inflation. Make sure your pressure is at the maximum before you ride.
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Old 06-10-09, 04:19 AM   #18
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So let see here, These flats are happening after you turn around and head for home, hmmmmm.

Obviously you need to just keep going.
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Old 06-10-09, 05:03 AM   #19
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Slow leak... Pinch flat?

Snake bite puncture is the tell-all symptom. Due to under-inflated tires. Make sure you have a good, reliable pressure gauge.
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Old 06-10-09, 05:18 AM   #20
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1. Always carry a spare tube, patch kit, levers and source of air (pump or C02..for us clydes I recommend a pump)

2. Always check your tire pressure before riding. Your rear should be at least the maximum recommended pressure for the tire, if not more, based on your weight.

3. Don't use ultra light racing tubes...saving 50 grams isn't gonna make much difference when we all have so much more that we can shave from the engine.

4. Make sure your rims have good rim tape...Velox...not that cheap crap.
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Old 06-10-09, 05:29 AM   #21
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Well Techno, just be happy it was the rear and not the front that went flat. When your front flats out your much more likely to go crashy crashy.

Some food for thought: When you see glass in the road and you swerve at the last minute to miss it, your front tire clears it but where do you think the back tire tracks? Yup, right over it. Your rear tire also carries the lions share of the riders weight not to mention that it is the tire providing the acceleration. If for some reason you find yourself frustrated and want to buy a new tire, put the new tire on the front and the old front on the rear for reasons I outlined above. You always want your best tire in the front.

Anyways, take a silver magic marker and make a mark on your tire where the valve stem is. This will be your reference point. Now remove your tire, pull the tube out, pump a couple lbs of air into it (about 3 psi will do) and find the leak. If it is on the rim side of the tube, install new rim tape and a new tube as I have never been able to successfully patch a rim side puncture. You might have better luck than I. If the hole is on the tire side then line your valve stem up to the reference mark you made and find the hole that made it through the casing. Check this very carefully for any debris, remove anything you find. Since the tire is off the rim anyways it is a good time to run some emery (I think that is what itís called) cloth around the inside of the rim. It's like sand paper for metal. Very lightly rub the inside side walls, this will help keep the tire from jumping off the bead when you re-inflate it. Also gently buff any rubber or marks out of the rim where your brake pads touch it. When I change tubes out I find that it helps to have just enough air in the tubes to hold the shape of the tube. I think it helps to prevent pinch flats cause from tire levers and the ole twisted tube.

So now that you have done the walk of shame, go back to your LBS and buy a seat pack. Put a new tube in it, patch kit, multi tool, tire levers, and a $20 dollar bill in it. The twenty is for a cab ride home if need be, cash on hand for a drink and snack at the gas station, or to use as a boot if your tire is slashed. Fold that money up and place it over the slash, it will be strong enough to let you re-inflate your tube and get home. Itís also re-useable; just donít forget that it is in there. Also buy a pump, not a CO2 inflator. Yes they are faster and require less effort but at least you won't be SOL if you run out of cartridges and your last one was a dud. Personally my favorite frame pump I've ever owned is the Topeak Road Morph . Itís marginally more expensive (I think it was $45 at the shop) but worth every penny from the times I've had to use it. Also buy a floor pump that has a gauge on it, inflate your tires to max PSI before every ride. Itís a PITA but will help prevent pinch flats.

I think that about covers it
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Old 06-10-09, 06:26 AM   #22
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Flats usually happen on the rear for everyone. The rear is weighted down, not the front. What the front rolls over will puncture the rear. I've been a bike mechanic for 15 years on a professional basis, and rear to front flats are about 8 to 1. When I worked neutral assistance for SRAM at the '08 Tour de Georgia, I changed 8 flats, all rear.

There is no problem with your bike and that rear wheel. Just you.
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Old 06-10-09, 07:09 AM   #23
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forget all this advice.

You need your girlfriend following you in a chase car. You flat, she leaps out with a spare wheel, you hold up the bike, she changes the wheel, and then pushes you to get going again.

It's what I do. Really. Wife and two kids chasing me all around S. Ontario. even for the early morning rides.
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Old 06-10-09, 08:39 AM   #24
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Evil pinch flats can still happen at full tire pressure. Riding on gravel, curb hopping, pot holes, un-even pavement where roads meet or sidewalks etc. Any good bump you feel in your backside can become one. It helps to ride light, get off the seat and adjust your weight so that less pressure is on each wheel as it goes over any bump.

Flats Happen
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Old 06-10-09, 08:45 AM   #25
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My concern is that I have my 3rd triathlon next weekend with a ride about this length, actually slightly longer. So, I want to not be worried that my big butt is causing pinch flats. Im going to look at a better tire for the rear. I'm going to get a pressure gauge. If Im not worried about ride, what PSI should I be looking at for a 320# ish person?
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