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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 06-18-09, 03:11 PM   #26
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I'm down to 258 but bought my CF Lemond Buenos Aires at 275lbs only problem I've ever had was the wheels, now riding 500 to 600 miles a month on 36 spoke rear and 32 spoke front with no issues at all. I plan to still be riding this set up when I'm down to 200.
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Old 06-18-09, 04:56 PM   #27
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Bikes that have weight limits, will have warnings of that weight limit all over them, because if a bicycle has say a 250lb weight limit, and the company does not warn you of it, they are still liable if it fails due to you being over that limit.
My Fuji's manual has warnings in it, on weight limit (250lbs) but not one warning on the bike anywhere.
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Old 06-18-09, 05:25 PM   #28
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Thanks for all the feedback so far. The 250 limit in the Fuji manual worries me; otherwise I was starting to feel pretty confident about taking the plunge.
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Old 06-18-09, 06:31 PM   #29
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I say if it's what you want then go for it. When I bought my current bike I was 292 lbs and wanting to get on the fast track to losing weight. I bought a 2006 Specialized Roubaix Elete (Carbon frame and fork) from CraigsList. The bike was in almost perfect condition with no cracks or problems of any kind on the frame or components. I had my LBS check it over and help set it up and have been riding the heck out of it since. I currently am at 252lbs and am still on the same bike with no problems other than having to replace the stock wheels for more "Clyde" friendly wheels in the form of a set of Velocity Deep Vs.
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Old 06-19-09, 05:55 AM   #30
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That's because they're different frames. What's your point?

Edit: That is to say, just because your carbon frame is smoother than your aluminum doesn't mean that's because one is carbon and one is aluminum.

As a counterexample, I'd guess that a Cannondale touring bike is smoother than a Tarmac SL2.
I thought you were refering to the wheelset making the difference in ride. I will admit that can be true I test rode a set of carbon clinchers and they felt great on my bike. Going back to frames and since you mentioned Cannondale take out a carbon Synapse and then an aluminum one. Same frame same geometry and believe me you will fell the difference but hey we could argue all day and get no where...lol If O.P. wants carbon I say buy it if it fits you and you're comfortable with your choice.
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Old 06-19-09, 08:01 AM   #31
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It's true. Stiffness comes from geometry moreso than material. You can have a harsh steel frame just as easily as a whippy aluminum or carbon, etc.

Now, controlling for weight tends to differentiate materials a bit, but in general Carbon Frame A with XYZ Wheels and IJK Tires is not necessarily a smoother ride than Aluminum Frame B with ABC Wheels and EFG Tires...
Often though Aluminum frames are harsh, because they are stiff because Aluminum will suffer from fatigue failures if it gets too flexy. Steel, Ti and Carbon don't have this problem, so they are built stiff for other reasons. I would expect a racing frame to be stiffer then a touring frame, because speed is more importing on a racing frame, where comfort is more important on a touring frame.
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Old 06-19-09, 08:08 AM   #32
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Often though Aluminum frames are harsh, because they are stiff because Aluminum will suffer from fatigue failures if it gets too flexy. Steel, Ti and Carbon don't have this problem, so they are built stiff for other reasons. I would expect a racing frame to be stiffer then a touring frame, because speed is more importing on a racing frame, where comfort is more important on a touring frame.
People think aluminum frames are harsh because the first thing that comes to mind for most is an aluminum race bike like a CAAD9 or similar. Of course a race bike is going to ride harsh. There are plenty of smooth aluminum frames (Specialized Allez and Sequoia come to mind); things like geometry, wheels, tires, fork, etc have a much larger effect on rider comfort than frame material.
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Old 06-19-09, 08:09 AM   #33
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My Fuji's manual has warnings in it, on weight limit (250lbs) but not one warning on the bike anywhere.
... But your in Canada and here in Canada, a warning in the manual is sufficient, because your much less likely to sue then if you lived in the US.
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Old 06-19-09, 09:04 AM   #34
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People think aluminum frames are harsh because the first thing that comes to mind for most is an aluminum race bike like a CAAD9 or similar. Of course a race bike is going to ride harsh.
Race bikes don't have to ride harsh. One of the smoothest bikes I've ridden is the Specialized S-Works Tarmac SL2, a carbon fiber race bike. The bike is incredibly stiff, yet extremely smooth at the same time. The Specialized Allez, in comparison, has an almost identical geometry (according to Specialized) and the ride is much less smooth. Not necessarily bad, just not as good as the Tarmac.
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Old 06-19-09, 02:31 PM   #35
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I went from an Aluminum Canondale 3.0 to a Klein Quantum also in Aluminum to a custom Stevenson in steel to a Giant OCR C3 carbon. I weighed between 205 & 215 when I had the first two, the Cannondale was so harsh that on one ride down a 2 mile slight decline over chip seal, my hands were so numb that I blew a stop sign at the end of the road. The Klein was like riding velvet but a bit too tall for me to get the right top tube length. The Stevenson custom was just that, custom so it fit perfect, but was heavy compared to the other three bikes because it was built for cyclocross and loaded touring.

I have weighed between 265 and 245 since I've had the OCR and have never felt worried about the frame. Never had an issue with true or broken spokes on the house brand 20/18 spoke wheels for that matter.

Given that, I would NEVER buy a used high end bike. Steel, aluminum or carbon. You just don't know how the bike has been treated.
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Old 06-20-09, 01:16 PM   #36
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Do the math:
W = Your weight fully clothed with your gear
[1-(W + weight of carbon bike)/(W + weight of steel bike)]x100%

That is the percent you are saving in weight. Now compare with the price difference in bikes. Is it worth it?

If you weigh more that 150lb I suggest you put your money into wheels, drive train, and saddle. Think Phil wood for a derailer bike.
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Old 06-20-09, 02:02 PM   #37
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I've heard plenty good about carbon, and just recently rode one for the first time (Madone). It was stupid fast and brilliant to climb up hills on - BUT - I'll never own another al or carbon bike. I've had one al frame crack on me, and I've read too much about carbon pieces/frames just up and failing for me to ever trust it:
http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2009...ing-blame.html

Steel, OTOH, will let you know before it goes kaput. I'll take the extra weight and have some peace of mind.
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Old 06-20-09, 03:10 PM   #38
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I've heard plenty good about carbon, and just recently rode one for the first time (Madone). It was stupid fast and brilliant to climb up hills on - BUT - I'll never own another al or carbon bike. I've had one al frame crack on me, and I've read too much about carbon pieces/frames just up and failing for me to ever trust it:
http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2009...ing-blame.html

Steel, OTOH, will let you know before it goes kaput. I'll take the extra weight and have some peace of mind.
Good points, but let's not equate the R-SYS with carbon frames in general.
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Old 06-20-09, 04:03 PM   #39
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Do the math:
W = Your weight fully clothed with your gear
[1-(W + weight of carbon bike)/(W + weight of steel bike)]x100%

That is the percent you are saving in weight. Now compare with the price difference in bikes. Is it worth it?

If you weigh more that 150lb I suggest you put your money into wheels, drive train, and saddle. Think Phil wood for a derailer bike.
But what if you are not a practical person and have no desire to ride an ugly bike. I really have no use for the look of old steel or new steel bikes, not my thing. Was told by many people when I bought my Madone just get a custom paint steel bike, no thanks! I rode all frame materials and sorry I couldn't find a steel frame that would come close to ttranfering power like my Madone. If you like steel knock yourself out, buy what you like. I did and very happy, sorry for venting but it gets real old when all you ever hear is 150+ why buy carbon? I like it, makes me happy = priceless!
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Old 06-20-09, 04:08 PM   #40
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I like it, makes me happy = priceless!
The biggest, most gigantic +1 in the world.
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Old 06-20-09, 05:01 PM   #41
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Do the math:
W = Your weight fully clothed with your gear
[1-(W + weight of carbon bike)/(W + weight of steel bike)]x100%

That is the percent you are saving in weight. Now compare with the price difference in bikes. Is it worth it?

If you weigh more that 150lb I suggest you put your money into wheels, drive train, and saddle. Think Phil wood for a derailer bike.
Based on that, I guess we all should ride "Big Box" beach cruisers..........
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Old 06-20-09, 05:25 PM   #42
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I had a carbon bike once and grew a vagina at the same time.......it could be just a coincidence but......... the moment I got rid of the bike my vagina disappeared.
xoxo
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Old 06-20-09, 06:15 PM   #43
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I've heard plenty good about carbon, and just recently rode one for the first time (Madone). It was stupid fast and brilliant to climb up hills on - BUT - I'll never own another al or carbon bike. I've had one al frame crack on me, and I've read too much about carbon pieces/frames just up and failing for me to ever trust it:
http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2009...ing-blame.html

Steel, OTOH, will let you know before it goes kaput. I'll take the extra weight and have some peace of mind.
For a carbon frame to fail, it needs to have been damaged at some point, this can be from a crash or manufacturing defect. They make fighter aircraft parts out of the same stuff. Carbon wheels, well a wheel is easily damaged, no matter what it's made of, so I don't think so. It has some advantages, it's light, it doesn't rust or corrode, it can be built stiff or flexy. Mind you those same features apply to Ti, but Ti is harder to damage to the point of failure, without it being readily noticeable. A Ti and carbon frame are about the same price. Personally I would prefer Ti.
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Old 06-21-09, 07:42 AM   #44
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Steel is still a better choice

I still think steel is a better choice. I am a muscular 220 and really don't see any advantage to CF. The ride is not much better than steel. The only time it is better is when you ride really high pressure tires and the only people who should use them are those actively compete. If you're competing then you just about have to have the "latest greatest thing ever" to compete. I don't want to ride around wondering when or if my frame is going to be a scene on You Tube. Everbody in this forum can find a better place to save the 32 ounces that a carbon frame saves in weight. I've been riding an '84 Trek more than 100K miles and expect to put another 100,000 on it before I think of giving it up.
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Old 06-21-09, 09:16 AM   #45
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I still think steel is a better choice. I am a muscular 220 and really don't see any advantage to CF. The ride is not much better than steel. The only time it is better is when you ride really high pressure tires and the only people who should use them are those actively compete.
Proper tire pressure, actually, is based on the weight the tire needs to support. Here's one reference and an even better one. As you can see, both of these sources recommend higher tire pressure for Clydes. I guess this means that we'd all benefit from riding CF bikes!

BTW, when was the last time your rode a carbon fiber bike? All of the CF bikes I've ridden lately have been significantly better than any steel bike I've ever ridden. Haven't managed to test ride any steel frames made with Reynolds 953 or True Temper S3, but the more common alloys just can't compare to CF in my opinion...
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Old 06-21-09, 09:47 AM   #46
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Sweet ride, really fast, the Roadie is a great bike.
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Old 06-21-09, 11:46 AM   #47
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Why not consider titanium? I see performance has a frame for $999 and with one of their upcoming coupons this could be a deal. http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...00_20000_26502

It's a re-branded Lynskey. Next bike I'm getting will be Titanium as I really dislike hearing stories about spontaneous carbon bike detonation for no reason. I'm not saying this Ti bike is the end all be all but I suspect it could take a better beating than any carbon bike could + last several years more than carbon.

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Old 06-21-09, 09:06 PM   #48
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I asked the lbs before I bought my Roubaix. The CF frame is good for 2200 lbs. The seatpost is rated for 250#'s.
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Old 06-21-09, 09:49 PM   #49
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Based on that, I guess we all should ride "Big Box" beach cruisers..........
No, but if getting bang for your buck is what you want, Drive train and Wheels are where to but your $. If you really want to drop some $ on a frame, have one custom built by an expert, possibly with S&S couplings. see Bilenky.com. Rohloff hub?
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Old 06-21-09, 10:01 PM   #50
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I have read this whole thing, and I have one question for the OP, have you even rode the Fuji yet? You may ride it and find it too twitchy or find something else you don't like about it. Then again, you may ride it and fall in love with it and have to bring it home. I have a mostly CF bike and my only real gripe with it is that I can't clamp anything on to it with out fear of crushing the tube. So, it sort of limits the options of the bike.
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