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  1. #26
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Historian View Post
    Under a weighty rider the seatpost bounces, eating into the force you apply to the pedals. Once I got rid of the suspension seatpost I became a stronger rider.
    See? i KNEW there was a reason that made sense, all I had to do was ask!

    Well, when we last looked in on "as the wheel turns" Dave was ready to settle for a... yellow..... Specialized Rockhopper for $629, unless....

    (cue dramatic music)

    Another bike should appear!

    The bike Dave wanted since he went to the Specialized website, and became confused by all the options, and extracted all the data, and made a spreadsheet, and sorted it by all sorts of criteria, and then picked the best one and it was ROAD HAZARD ORANGE!

    Oh, they call it "Speed Orange, but COME ONE! It's gonna be Rollerdave riding this thing, speed may be in the picture, but it will DEFINITELY BE A ROAD HAZARD!

    But it was a hot commodity. A popular color, and it was transition, so they were switching out to the new model year with paint schemes that make Dave's eyes bleed to look at them. The new color schemes must be some sort of subliminal anti-theft feature because the make the brain recoil and the eye shrivel up and die.

    Horrible.

    So, Dave was going to settle, going to pay more, what will dave do?

    Will a better bike appear on the horizon? (dramatic music)

    Will the clock run out and will dave have to settle? (more dramatic music)

    Are you even still reading this drivel? Don't you have better things to do? (crescendo)

    (Commercial break for some unmentionable hygiene product)

    Scene: Back room of Bike King bike shop in inver grove heights, morning.

    Kip: Hello, Bike King, how can I help you? Uh huh, um yeah, ok, I can see how youd... Ok, Yes we have just ONE left. Yes it's still in the box. Hardrock Sport disc, yup. Sir? hello? are you there? How much? Looks like that would be $529. Sir? you are going to have to stop jubilating, I can't hear you. No, no problem at all sir. How late are we open? 4PM sir.

    I was there in record time, it's the beautiful Road Hazard Orange bike, never been touched, I helped him pull the box open (and remove the staples)... I helped him pull it out, its new.

    And it's mine as of Tuesday when my money transfer finishes!

    The dude is holding it with no deposit until then!

    So, it looks like a happy "so far!"

    (as opposed to a happy ending, because its just starting)

    I picked out a set of wide wide pedals, and a better saddle, and I found my helmet, cleaned it, and made sure it was perfect.

    I'm ready steady go, baby!

    Thanks all!

    RD

  2. #27
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    I've been building bikes out of my bike pile for friends and family so I can have people to ride with.

    They are not "bike shop quality" heck they would have to improve vastly to make it up to "department store quality"

    IS THERE a "bike pile quality" level?

    Hey, free is not always great but it's definitely free. If they get the bug and want better, they didn't pay a dime for the bike I built so they can still afford to go out and buy one.

    It also ties up another loose end at the old place and lets me call the metal man on that pile knowing I got all that was saveable out of it.

    RD

  3. #28
    Tilting with windmills txvintage's Avatar
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    Hey, building up and restoring life to an otherwise derelict bike and passing it on to someone who will ride it is a noble thing in my opinion. I've passed on a couple of resurrected project bikes with the request that if they give up or "upgrade" that they too pass it on to someone who is thinking about riding.

    Congrats on the new ride. Can't wait for the pics. I have visions of international orange greatness!

  4. #29
    Junior Member Oidar's Avatar
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    OK, here's my deal. I'm 6'-0" / 435 lbs. I wear a 32" inseam, and carry most of it high. (belly, chest)

    Saturday, LBS made me a GREAT DEAL on a NEW 2008 Connondale F7 Disc (they recommeded it over the Rockhopper BTW) which is a beautiful bike, but it KILLS ME to ride it. I had asked about taller handlebars like a BMX bike, but he told me the idea was to devide my weight between seat and handlebars. Well, I crush the front forks nearly all the way down, which throws my considerable weight too far forward for my arms to hold up for long. They put a pretty good sized Specialized springy seat on it for me, but after 7/10ths of a mile I was litterally bleeding between the legs along the seams of my tighty-whities. The LBS owner was out when I took it back Monday, but the manager never mentioned locking out the fork. Does the Cannondale even do that?

    Tuesday, I rode a Caloi 7 speed cruiser (ala craigslist) and I LOVED IT! Even though my privates were still sore, I rode around an entire block fairly comfortably. Now this particular bike had been left outside at some point and had rusty hardware here and there, plus the guy wanted $150 bucks for it so I had to pass, but my question is, why would I not want a cruiser like this instead of a mountain bike?
    Illegitimi non carborundum (Don't Let the B@stards Grind You Down)

  5. #30
    Senior Member
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    Got the bike. Very nice.

    No pics yet as I am unable to smile today.

    No not related to the bike, and yes it may pass.

    Thnx,

    RD
    Last edited by Rollerdave; 07-22-09 at 09:16 PM. Reason: spelling

  6. #31
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    Just took my first lil midnight ride, it was cool and the ground was damp. I spose there was bugs, but they couldn't keep up to, well "bug" me.

    So easy! Its light, compact, fits right in my front hall, my drive is no longer Mount Parnassus...

    Open the door, pop out for a few minutes (helmet on) and come back. Repeat in 15 to 20 mins.

    Gonna do this MUCH more often!

    RD
    Last edited by Rollerdave; 07-22-09 at 10:53 PM. Reason: the usual, spelling

  7. #32
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oidar View Post
    OK, here's my deal. I'm 6'-0" / 435 lbs. I wear a 32" inseam, and carry most of it high. (belly, chest)

    Saturday, LBS made me a GREAT DEAL on a NEW 2008 Connondale F7 Disc (they recommeded it over the Rockhopper BTW) which is a beautiful bike, but it KILLS ME to ride it. I had asked about taller handlebars like a BMX bike, but he told me the idea was to devide my weight between seat and handlebars. Well, I crush the front forks nearly all the way down, which throws my considerable weight too far forward for my arms to hold up for long. They put a pretty good sized Specialized springy seat on it for me, but after 7/10ths of a mile I was litterally bleeding between the legs along the seams of my tighty-whities. The LBS owner was out when I took it back Monday, but the manager never mentioned locking out the fork. Does the Cannondale even do that?

    Tuesday, I rode a Caloi 7 speed cruiser (ala craigslist) and I LOVED IT! Even though my privates were still sore, I rode around an entire block fairly comfortably. Now this particular bike had been left outside at some point and had rusty hardware here and there, plus the guy wanted $150 bucks for it so I had to pass, but my question is, why would I not want a cruiser like this instead of a mountain bike?
    A cruiser is a wonderful bike. The reason a mountain bike is recommended is that many, perhaps most, guys want something more agile and speedy than a cruiser. Also the bike that's comfortable for a ride around the block isn't always the bike that's comfortable at mile 40 of a 50 mile ride. Take it from someone who rode a metric century (62 mile ride) on a Trek Navigator cruiser.

    I don't know about the bike you returned having a lockout or not on the fork. It sounds as if your saddle was too wide for you, and the bike wasn't fit to you properly. A good shop will fit the bike to the rider, and here this didn't happen. "Throwing your weight between seat and handlebars" sounds horribly wrong for a novice rider. How high was the saddle in relation to the handlebars? Level as in the photo below, or raised above the bars?


  8. #33
    Senior Member
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    Another spin, think i need a light.

    RD

  9. #34
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rollerdave View Post
    Another spin, think i need a light.

    RD
    And reflective clothing.

  10. #35
    Senior Member
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    and a strobelight propeller beanie with GPS?

    Kewl!

    RD

  11. #36
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oidar View Post
    OK, here's my deal. I'm 6'-0" / 435 lbs. I wear a 32" inseam, and carry most of it high. (belly, chest)

    Saturday, LBS made me a GREAT DEAL on a NEW 2008 Connondale F7 Disc (they recommeded it over the Rockhopper BTW) which is a beautiful bike, but it KILLS ME to ride it. I had asked about taller handlebars like a BMX bike, but he told me the idea was to devide my weight between seat and handlebars. Well, I crush the front forks nearly all the way down, which throws my considerable weight too far forward for my arms to hold up for long. They put a pretty good sized Specialized springy seat on it for me, but after 7/10ths of a mile I was litterally bleeding between the legs along the seams of my tighty-whities. The LBS owner was out when I took it back Monday, but the manager never mentioned locking out the fork. Does the Cannondale even do that?

    Tuesday, I rode a Caloi 7 speed cruiser (ala craigslist) and I LOVED IT! Even though my privates were still sore, I rode around an entire block fairly comfortably. Now this particular bike had been left outside at some point and had rusty hardware here and there, plus the guy wanted $150 bucks for it so I had to pass, but my question is, why would I not want a cruiser like this instead of a mountain bike?
    Mountain bikes tend to be a bit more stout off the showroom floor than your typical cruiser. I looked up the specs on an 08 CO2 F7 and found that it comes stock with an RST Gila Pro T8 fork. I didn't spend too much time looking it up but my initial indication is that it does not come with a lock out. It does however have a preload adjustment which you can tighten to make the fork a bit stiffer.

    Not to threadjack Rollerdave but my advice to you is to look into getting a ridgid fork (one without suspension), it will make a world of difference.

  12. #37
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rollerdave View Post
    and a strobelight propeller beanie with GPS?

    Kewl!

    RD

    Sorry, you need to upgrade that beanie immeadiatly to a motorized strobelight propeller beanie with GPS less you loose your street cred around here.

    All the cool kids have motorized propeller beanies. Now go tape some playing cards to your fork so your spokes hit them to make the motorbike noise.

  13. #38
    Junior Member Oidar's Avatar
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    First, Historian, let me repeat what I said in another thread. You are my new hero! Where you once were, I am now. I can only hope to post the kind of losses you've accomplished.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Historian View Post
    A cruiser is a wonderful bike. The reason a mountain bike is recommended is that many, perhaps most, guys want something more agile and speedy than a cruiser. Also the bike that's comfortable for a ride around the block isn't always the bike that's comfortable at mile 40 of a 50 mile ride. Take it from someone who rode a metric century (62 mile ride) on a Trek Navigator cruiser.

    At 435, "Speedy & Agile" are words that have nothing to do with me. I know myself, and if it's not comfortable, I just won't ride it. Also, I don't mind trading up when 50-60 mile rides become more than a distant dream.

    I don't know about the bike you returned having a lockout or not on the fork. It sounds as if your saddle was too wide for you, and the bike wasn't fit to you properly. A good shop will fit the bike to the rider, and here this didn't happen. "Throwing your weight between seat and handlebars" sounds horribly wrong for a novice rider. How high was the saddle in relation to the handlebars? Level as in the photo below, or raised above the bars?

    My saddle was too wide? My caboose is so big it needs it's own ZIP Code! I was thinking I needed something like a tractor seat! I tried raising and lowering the seat, but it was maybe a little higher than the bars *before* I got aboard. After that, I felt like was aiming for the earth's core! Thanks for the help BTW. I appreciate it.

    Illegitimi non carborundum (Don't Let the B@stards Grind You Down)

  14. #39
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oidar View Post
    First, Historian, let me repeat what I said in another thread. You are my new hero! Where you once were, I am now. I can only hope to post the kind of losses you've accomplished.
    Not historian here, but saddles and caboose width are not related. The key is the width between the sit bones, you can have a wide derrière and narrow sit bones. Some bicycle dealers, particularly Specialized have a device called the Ass-o-meter (honestly) that measures the sit bones.

    As to cabooses, I don't think any railway still uses them, it's been replaced by a small radio transmitter called an EOT (End Of Train) Indicator, this transmits a special signal, a receiver in the locomotive receives the signal, if the signal disappears then the engineer is notified, and can take action. Trains, use negative braking (air pressure is used to hold the brakes off), so if the back end becomes disconnected, it will lose air pressure and the brakes will come on. In fact on passenger trains the emergency stop opens a valve and dumps the air pressure. The problem with this, it can take a long time to build that pressure back up. This was implemented back in the steam days when a few trains had this kind of problem. I've always wondered why they don't do this with trucks and buses that have air brakes, which are designed to use pressure to apply the brakes, being unable to take the brakes off because the pressure is low, makes more sense to me. Same should be done with car brakes (and some bicycle brakes) that use fluid, if the reservoir is low, you can't get the brakes off, and you can't go, better then being unable to stop.

  15. #40
    Junior Member Oidar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wogsterca View Post
    As to cabooses, I don't think any railway still uses them, it's been replaced by a small radio transmitter called an EOT (End Of Train) Indicator, this transmits a special signal, a receiver in the locomotive receives the signal, if the signal disappears then the engineer is notified, and can take action.
    Mine's 47 years old so I still call it a caboose!

    Seriously, I check into the Ass-O-Meter. Thanks.
    Illegitimi non carborundum (Don't Let the B@stards Grind You Down)

  16. #41
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    more night rides, think i'll take it in tomorrow for that light, and have the spokes tightened a mite.

    There was some popping and clicking in the front wheel.

    No pictures yet, been having hectic stuff to deal with.

    RD

  17. #42
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oidar View Post
    First, Historian, let me repeat what I said in another thread. You are my new hero! Where you once were, I am now. I can only hope to post the kind of losses you've accomplished.
    OK, so I'm your hero. Your hero is now speaking, so listen up....

    Either the shop you went to set you up on the wrong bike, wrong size bike, or wrongly fit bike, you are mountain-building the bad experience, or both. Go to another shop. Explain that you are a novice and want a bike to ride to lose weight. Look at cruisers if you wish. Make sure the shop works with you to make you comfortable on the bike. If they won't do that, find another shop.

    That's the shop's responsibility. YOUR responsibility is to expect there to be changes in the future for you. You might ride the bike a few weeks and discover the saddle is uncomfortable after a few miles. You might get extenders on the pedals at some point. A longer stem. Bike shorts. Handlebar grips. Clipless pedals. Or you might not need to change any of them. You won't know until you start getting miles in. In other words, don't expect the bike to be perfect out of the box, and don't become discouraged when it isn't. Changes are to be expected; fortunately bicycles are very adaptable machines.

    Part of the expectation of changes in your future is that YOU have to bring about most of those changes. Don't rely on the bicycle to lose the weight for you. It's a tool, and a part of a whole, but that's it. Eating less and better, and exercise, is what will take off the weight and build muscle. I'm an anomaly on this forum, since most of my weight loss was before I learned to ride a bike. I did whatever I was physically able to do, and had a great time doing it.

    BTW, since folks can never get enough photos of me, here's me and my cruiser in April 2007.



    Feel free to PM me if you like.

  18. #43
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wogsterca View Post
    Not historian here, but saddles and caboose width are not related. The key is the width between the sit bones, you can have a wide derrière and narrow sit bones. Some bicycle dealers, particularly Specialized have a device called the Ass-o-meter (honestly) that measures the sit bones.

    As to cabooses, I don't think any railway still uses them, it's been replaced by a small radio transmitter called an EOT (End Of Train) Indicator, this transmits a special signal, a receiver in the locomotive receives the signal, if the signal disappears then the engineer is notified, and can take action. Trains, use negative braking (air pressure is used to hold the brakes off), so if the back end becomes disconnected, it will lose air pressure and the brakes will come on. In fact on passenger trains the emergency stop opens a valve and dumps the air pressure. The problem with this, it can take a long time to build that pressure back up. This was implemented back in the steam days when a few trains had this kind of problem. I've always wondered why they don't do this with trucks and buses that have air brakes, which are designed to use pressure to apply the brakes, being unable to take the brakes off because the pressure is low, makes more sense to me. Same should be done with car brakes (and some bicycle brakes) that use fluid, if the reservoir is low, you can't get the brakes off, and you can't go, better then being unable to stop.
    Nifty lesson on trains Wog, thank you for adding to my collection of useless information

    If I were to guess why trucks and busses don't use negative air pressure to engage their it would be due to the large amounts of air pressure required to open the brakes back up. Just imagine how much worse a traffic jam would be if we had to wait for that big rig to build it's air pressure back up each time it had to move forward 10 feet. Also I think that brake modulation would be an issue, what if you were on the freeway and wanted to slow down 10mph? If you bled out the air pressure your brakes would snap shut and lock up.

    They do have another neat little trick called compression braking or "Jake" braking which more to less consists of a second exhaust valve which releases the compressed air in the combustion chamber which will then make that very loud chattering noise.

  19. #44
    Junior Member Oidar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Historian View Post
    OK, so I'm your hero. Your hero is now speaking, so listen up....
    Thank you oh wise one. I hear your words, and shall obey!

    Seriously, I appreciate the time you're taking to help me.
    Illegitimi non carborundum (Don't Let the B@stards Grind You Down)

  20. #45
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oidar View Post
    Thank you oh wise one. I hear your words, and shall obey!

    Seriously, I appreciate the time you're taking to help me.
    Good. Go get a bike and ride. And let us know how the rides go. Your hero has spoken!


  21. #46
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bautieri View Post
    Nifty lesson on trains Wog, thank you for adding to my collection of useless information

    If I were to guess why trucks and busses don't use negative air pressure to engage their it would be due to the large amounts of air pressure required to open the brakes back up. Just imagine how much worse a traffic jam would be if we had to wait for that big rig to build it's air pressure back up each time it had to move forward 10 feet. Also I think that brake modulation would be an issue, what if you were on the freeway and wanted to slow down 10mph? If you bled out the air pressure your brakes would snap shut and lock up.

    They do have another neat little trick called compression braking or "Jake" braking which more to less consists of a second exhaust valve which releases the compressed air in the combustion chamber which will then make that very loud chattering noise.
    Well, I am sure that if you had to slow a train down by 10MPH that it's possible to remove some of the pressure, without dumping the air completely. To open the brakes up after a full stop, simply means having sufficient air in the reserve tank.

    The problem with Jake brakes is they are not permitted to be used a lot of places, you can often hear them from miles away.

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