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  1. #1
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    Noobie ordering first road bike would like some input

    New to this forum. Great stuff here.

    Just started riding a month ago. Bought a hybrid (khs urbanxpress) and been riding as much as i can.
    Wanted to get more exercise cause i was getting a bit tired of jogging.

    I fell in love with riding.

    Still only able to do five miles in my neighborhood, but it is all hills with virtually no flat riding.

    my stats are as follows
    6'2"
    280# (was 320 about 6 months ago)

    I love my hybrid, but it leaves me wanting when riding by myself. I have a child carrier and take my son with me alot and he loves it. I'm going to keep the hybrid so i can have a more casual/easy bike to ride with my son and wife, but am going to get a road bike for more serious riding.

    My LBS ( bicycledoc.com ) is awesome and if you live in atlanta I highly recommend him.

    I'm able to get a great deal on a blue rc8 frame http://www.rideblue.com/rc8.php

    He recommends me getting the sram rival groupset.

    I need some opinions on some of the other componets i should get with the bike.

    Wheels ( i know every advocates high spoke count, what wheels would be best)
    Tires ( plan on getting 700c 25)
    seat post (???)
    drop bars (???)
    computer (want to be able to track cadence)
    saddle (again, open to suggestion)

    I wanted to get a bike i could grow with(while shrinking hopefully).
    Some goals
    Lose the weight
    Ride a century
    Socialize with people.
    Get more of my friends and family to ride.

    Would love some input or encouragement with my cycling journey.

  2. #2
    VoodooChile zoste's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum, and to cycling. What does the LBS recommend for those components?

    Here's what I've got on my Salsa Casseroll:


    Wheels: Mavic Open Pro Ultegra (front) and (rear). So far no complaints and they've taken me from 240 down to 230.

    Tires: Conti Ultra Gatorskins. I have 700 x 28's. I've read that you don't lose any speed to rolling resistence going from 25 to 28 but the ride is less harsh on the larger tyre - YMMV.

    Seatpost: Velo Orange long set back. The long set back helps with my...

    Saddle: Brooks B-17 modified by Monarch McLaren to have Selle Anatomica slot. The Brooks rails are kind of short, which is why I trid the VO seatpost.

    Bars: Salsa moto-ace short and shallow - came stock with the bike and I haven't seen the need to change them.

    Computer: Personally I use a Garmin Edge 705. It's nice to have the mapping features and the ability to upload (and download) rides, but it's overkill; I was happy enough with a $20 wired computer from the LBS.


    All of these really are personal choices and you should take all the recommendations with a grain of salt.
    Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

  3. #3
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    If you are serious about riding. The single most important thing you can do when getting a new bike is get yourself fitted!!!!!!! Don't worry about model components or anything else before you get fitted. By fitting, I don't mean some guy looking at you, scratching his chin and deciding you need a 60cm frame! A good fitting will have you not only getting measured but spending time on a "fit bike." This will cost you around $150 depending on the bike shop but it is the best $'s you can spend. A good fitter will answer all those questions you have 110% better than any of us can here on the internet. Except maybe the computer one. I like the VDO 1.0+ It's awesome.

    Regarding wheels, most OEM wheels are marginal, especially for us larger riders. I'd stick with what comes with the bike until it breaks. Then invest in a good strong wheel set made by a wheel builder who knows what they are doing. The OEM wheels can be helped along if you put 100 miles or so on them then take then in and have them retensioned. You just might find they will last a very long time. Spoke count is a factor but not as big a factor as being properly tensioned. The saddle is a very personal thing and what works for you will depend on your anatomy. Any mid level component group will be perfect for your new ride.
    What an awesome adventure you're starting out on! Hope to see you out on the road one day sporting an a smile and the perfect new bike for you!

  4. #4
    SERENITY NOW!!! jyossarian's Avatar
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    Stick w/ whatever wheels the bike comes with. Just take the bike in after a week or two to get the wheels re-tensioned/re-trued since they may have been machine built. Same w/ the seatpost. Saddles are a personal thing, but to give you an idea, I use a Brooks Swift on my roadie and it's fine for more aggressive riding positions, but not so good for more upright positions.

    +1 to getting fitted. There's a lot of different drop bars available because of the need for different measurements and positions (short and shallow vs. deep, anatomical vs. traditional, etc.) A fitting will help you narrow down the choices.
    HHCMF - Take pride in your ability to amaze lesser mortals! - MikeR



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  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    thanks for the input so far.

    I'm purchasing the frame set that the lbs has in stock and pretty much buying the components to have a complete bike
    so there are no stock wheels. I can choose whatever i like.
    that pretty much goes for every piece of the bike.

  6. #6
    Senior Member dbikingman's Avatar
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    I guess if it were me I would buy a complete bike rather than building a bike. Once you have ridden for a while then yoiu might have a better feel for what you want or need. But, I wasn't looking to buy a full carbon bike maybe when I slid down to the bottom end of being a clyde.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinnster View Post
    I'm able to get a great deal on a blue rc8 frame http://www.rideblue.com/rc8.php
    If your goal is to do a century and you're used to riding a hybrid bike, you might want to look for something with a longer head tube and more upright seating position. Compare the geometry of the RC8 to a Specialized Roubaix, Cervelo RS, Cannondale Synape, Giant Defy, etc. Those are all road bikes that are designed to be a bit more comfortable over long distances...

    He recommends me getting the sram rival groupset.
    I love SRAM. Suggest you do a test-ride though and make sure that you like it. Many long-term Shimano users don't like the noise and... crispness... of SRAM shifting.

    Wheels ( i know every advocates high spoke count, what wheels would be best)
    The standard recommendation is for hand-built wheels based on Shimano Ultegra hubs and Mavic Open Pro rims with 32 or 36 spokes. Bicycle Wheel Warehouse has good prices on them.

    Tires ( plan on getting 700c 25)
    I've had reasonably good luck with Continental Ultra Gatorskins and Continental GP 4-season tires. Lots of people like the Michelin Krylion Carbon, but they run a bit larger than their stated size. Realistically, if you're not riding 500-miles a month or racing, probably anything will work...

    seat post (???)
    Thomson Elite Setback

    drop bars (???)
    I'm a big fan of the 3T Ergonova and Ergosum handlebars.

    computer (want to be able to track cadence)
    Cateye Strada Cadence if you don't mind wires, or maybe the new Cateye Stada Double Wireless if you do.

    saddle (again, open to suggestion)
    I've been riding a Selle SMP Extra and thought it was a very good saddle. Recently bit the bullet and upgraded to their Lite 209 model. It works so well I wish I'd upgraded sooner! Even with the ridiculously outrageous price... For a more affordable saddle, I'd suggest looking at WTB. I've ridden the Rocket V and Speed V saddles and like them. Many people recommend the Specialized Toupe, though I thought it was the worst saddle I've ever ridden. The Specialized Phenom worked slightly better for me, but still wasn't great.

    Unfortunately, you may have to try several saddles before you find one that fits your anatomy and riding style...

  8. #8
    SERENITY NOW!!! jyossarian's Avatar
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    Well, if you're building from scratch, Mavic Open Pros are solid. Velocity Deep V's are super solid, but heavy. The Velocity Aeros are good too.
    HHCMF - Take pride in your ability to amaze lesser mortals! - MikeR



    We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!

  9. #9
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    In looking at the Blue site, the RD1 is a complete bike with 105 components, and what looks like a similar frame (different angles, so not exactly the same) for less... Would someone suggest that the OP check it out as a first bike?

    Of course, it might not be as nice a frame, but to include the full build, and be cheaper, I know if it were my money I would at least consider it.
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

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  10. #10
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    Are you sure that the rc8 frame that the bike shop has will fit you or are they selling it at a great deal because it's left over? I don't mean to discourage you because you can most certainly build a bike from scratch but are you going to be happy with the end product??? I could put you on a $10,000 bike and you'd be miserable if it doesn't fit you properly. I could also put you on a $600 bike and you'd be happy as a clam if it fit you right. This is especially true if you are going to be moving up to doing centuries and maybe beyond. Do you know what width handlebars to get? What kind of bars? Do you need a setback or straight seat post? How long of a stem do you need? What length crank arms? Do you know what length to cut the steering head on the fork...?

    This is why getting fitted is so important. When you are done you have a complete set of measurements and geometry numbers so that when you build your bike it's just a matter of putting the right pieces in the right places. It actually takes a lot of the questions out of the equation.

    Regarding wheels, check Peter White Cycles. You'll get some of the strongest, best wheels anywhere. There is a lead time involved with his stuff though.
    www.peterwhitecycles.com

  11. #11
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    I'd recommend larger tires than 25s, if the frame allows (and many do not).

    I'm about your size (270, down from 320), and I have 28s on my road bike (and 32s on my "commuter" bike). This works well for me.

    I've got custom built 36H rear wheels on both bikes, but the commuter wheel is beginning to get a bit soft after 2000+ miles.

  12. #12
    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
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    Looks like too much bike to me unless you are a racer. There are many really nice complete bikes available for less than that frameset. If you don't know enough to know exactly wich components you want in a build and why, you should buy a complete bike.
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
    May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey

  13. #13
    Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Darwin View Post
    In looking at the Blue site, the RD1 is a complete bike with 105 components, and what looks like a similar frame (different angles, so not exactly the same) for less... Would someone suggest that the OP check it out as a first bike?

    Of course, it might not be as nice a frame, but to include the full build, and be cheaper, I know if it were my money I would at least consider it.
    I rode this bike. Excellent value and great ride. The rc8 has stronger construction and i was able to get the rc8 fully built for not too much more money than the rd1. Also the rd1 comes in mostly pre assembled, no frameset only, so if i wanted to upgrade components than i would have to spend extra on top of that. Plus the Rc8 will be built by my LBS so to me there is some accountibility on his part when he builds the bike. He knows how i'm built and can take into consideration when building my bike. Plus i can kick his ass if he didn't assemble a part correctly. =)

    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    Are you sure that the rc8 frame that the bike shop has will fit you or are they selling it at a great deal because it's left over? I don't mean to discourage you because you can most certainly build a bike from scratch but are you going to be happy with the end product??? I could put you on a $10,000 bike and you'd be miserable if it doesn't fit you properly. I could also put you on a $600 bike and you'd be happy as a clam if it fit you right. This is especially true if you are going to be moving up to doing centuries and maybe beyond. Do you know what width handlebars to get? What kind of bars? Do you need a setback or straight seat post? How long of a stem do you need? What length crank arms? Do you know what length to cut the steering head on the fork...?

    This is why getting fitted is so important. When you are done you have a complete set of measurements and geometry numbers so that when you build your bike it's just a matter of putting the right pieces in the right places. It actually takes a lot of the questions out of the equation.

    Regarding wheels, check Peter White Cycles. You'll get some of the strongest, best wheels anywhere. There is a lead time involved with his stuff though.
    www.peterwhitecycles.com
    Thanks for the input. the lbs is not trying to offload this frame on me. It is my size and they will fit me for all the components and final assembly. the do professional fittings as well http://www.bicycledoc.com/fitting.html

    Quote Originally Posted by c_m_shooter View Post
    Looks like too much bike to me unless you are a racer. There are many really nice complete bikes available for less than that frameset. If you don't know enough to know exactly wich components you want in a build and why, you should buy a complete bike.
    I appreciate the input. And i agree with you that there are a lot of great complete bikes for less. But this is where i stand on that. I am of the school of thought that you should get the most bike you can afford. otherwise you always kind of sit there and think about the bike you could have got. Plus i plan on doing alot with this bike, training, getting healthier, socializing, and also racing(hopefully)

    I was able to test ride a bike with this frame and fell in love with it. Soaked up the road vibrations and also felt stiff at the same time.

    Plus, which is a really great plus for me as a business owner is that "Blue Competition Cycles" is based in atlanta 2 miles away from my lbs. I love supporting local business and try to buy stuff locally as possible. This seemed like a major plus for me. And Blue has great customer service (from what i've read from this board) and since they are right around the corner if i have a problem then they can solve very quickly without me having to ship the frame.

    I wanted to get some opinions on all the other components because there are so many different saddles, bars, wheels out there. I trust my lbs (single man operation) and value his input the most, but i also wanted to get the opinion from fellow clydes.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    Looks like you are on the right track. Spend the $75, you won't regret it! So many people buy a bike without being fitted then wonder why everything hurts afterward. Sorry if I sounded like I was on my soapbox. I hate to see people waste money. I'd stick with what your lbs is telling you regarding components. It doesn't sound like he's given you any bad advice yet.

    ps. I'm with you, buy the best bike you can afford! Especially regarding components.

  15. #15
    Mass Mover takingcontrol's Avatar
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    As for saddles, Always check CL. I see saddles that others have tried and not worked for them for 1/2 the price of new

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