Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-22-09, 07:44 AM   #26
sakonnetclip
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 337
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think you want to do whatever gives you sustainable speed. I'm usually riding by the coast where it's always pretty windy and rolling hills. I tend to keep my cadence around 100-105 regardless and just ride a bit slower if there's a strong headwind, but try to keep my output consistent. I'm usually riding alone as well.

-spence

Last edited by sakonnetclip; 08-22-09 at 07:49 AM.
sakonnetclip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-09, 11:11 AM   #27
youcoming
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Ontario Canada
Bikes: Opus Andante/Parleez5i/Burley Tosa Tandem
Posts: 2,131
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtlewoman View Post
Don't we, as Clydesdales/Athenas just have a bigger surface area? Doesn't that make us more susceptible to head winds? It's just harder for us to go forward, am I right? So, we should either always travel in reverse or be happy with the progress we're making!! That's probably not what you were looking for, is it?
I ride with many very fast skinny riders and they all love having me out in the wind, yes more surface area but harder to slow my momentum. Not sure if it's true or not but I seem to struggle less in the wind than my skinny friends.
youcoming is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-09, 03:32 PM   #28
Crabster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cape May NJ
Bikes:
Posts: 101
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'll tell you what, climbing a hill and getting a good burn in your quads makes you feel alive and is very rewarding when you reach the top. Riding into the wind totally sucks @ss.
Crabster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-09, 06:14 PM   #29
eshvanu
Bicycle n00B
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: None yet
Posts: 383
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cod.peace View Post
Exactly. Fully faired you will laugh at the wind. Something like this Lightning F-40 would do nicely:
Whoa! What happens if it's a side-wind?
eshvanu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-09, 07:24 PM   #30
deraltekluge
Senior Member
 
deraltekluge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Bikes: Kona Cinder Cone, Sun EZ-3 AX
Posts: 1,195
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by flip18436572 View Post
Today I had wind gust that would slow me down by over 3mph in seconds according to my Garmin with the same gear and same cadence.

THoughts????
Yeah, I have thoughts...your Garmin is lying. If you're in the same gear and at the same cadence, your speed has to be the same.
deraltekluge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-09, 08:21 PM   #31
Rob P.
Fred at large
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Roads of Ventura County Ca
Bikes:
Posts: 640
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Wind - how to beat it?????
Buy windsock. Catch wind and put into sock. Beat sock with baseball bat. Wind is now beat.

Seriously, that's about all you can do other than just put up with it (and/or mumble under your breath about how unfair it is).
Rob P. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-09, 08:35 PM   #32
flip18436572
Triathlon in my future???
Thread Starter
 
flip18436572's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Southwest Iowa
Bikes: Junk, that is why I am here. :-)
Posts: 2,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by deraltekluge View Post
Yeah, I have thoughts...your Garmin is lying. If you're in the same gear and at the same cadence, your speed has to be the same.
I know that isn't true, because I could run the big ring in the front and the rear and run at 15 mph without any wind at a 90 cadence, but with a 10 mph wind I would be less than that, probably more like 13 mph.
__________________
2007 Jamis Ventura Comp
2006 Jamis Explorer 2.0
2000 Specialized Hardrock (bought used)
Swim, Bike, Run and sounds like fun
flip18436572 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-09, 08:58 PM   #33
Herbie53
Senior Member
 
Herbie53's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 7,189
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 144 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by flip18436572 View Post
I know that isn't true, because I could run the big ring in the front and the rear and run at 15 mph without any wind at a 90 cadence, but with a 10 mph wind I would be less than that, probably more like 13 mph.

Your chain is slipping? You're applying so much torque that the rear tire is breaking lose? Or perhaps you're going downhill and coasting a bit during your no wind test.

I don't think it's mechanically possible to go two different speeds in the same gear at the same cadence otherwise.

Wind does suck, it's like a never ending hill, but it sure is nice going downwind and hearing nothing but the music of the tires and driveline.

Last edited by Herbie53; 08-22-09 at 09:21 PM.
Herbie53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-09, 10:14 PM   #34
surfjimc
Used to be fast
 
surfjimc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: So Cal
Bikes: 85 Specialized Expedition, 07 Motobecane Immortal Spirit built up with Dura ace and Mavic Ksyriums, '85 Bianchi Track Bike, '90 Fisher Procaliber, '96 Landshark TwinDirt Shark Tandem, '88 Curtlo
Posts: 575
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You can try the 2-1 or 3-1 method. Two hours into the wind, one hour back. Or up it to 3 into the wind.
surfjimc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-09, 11:20 AM   #35
Ranger63
Senior Member
 
Ranger63's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: western new york
Bikes: mid 80s Ross Centaur converted to Alfine 11 09 motobecane imortal force, 83 Ross Paragon,81 Schwinn LeTour Tourist, 91 Paramount, 93 GT converted to city bike
Posts: 719
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
wind

If you ride with a club you already know about pacelines and getting 'pulled'.
If you ride solo, do what I do.
Find a cadence (now arguably, there are times-and this season in western ny has been one- when getting off and walking finally became the only option)
Find a cadence that works for you and for your legs.
Unless you have a masochistic streak you'll find no advantage in trying to maintain the speed you can maintain in windless rides.
The idea is to come in with enough leg that going out cycling the next day is looked forward to.
Ranger63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-09, 09:43 PM   #36
cod.peace
Senior Member
 
cod.peace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: eastern Massachusetts
Bikes: Rans V-Rex
Posts: 999
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by eshvanu View Post
Whoa! What happens if it's a side-wind?
Why, you just turn into the wind, of course! (oh, and that bike has slits in the fabric sock to get your feet down at a stop).
cod.peace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-09, 09:57 PM   #37
msh1283
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 105
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Aggressive bike set up. Large saddle to bar drop. Good, aerodynamic form. Form fitting kit. I ride with a guy who is 3 inches shorter than me and has 20 pounds of muscle on me. If we coast down a hill from a stop, I'll beat him to the bottom every time. Setup is extremely important for aerodynamics.
msh1283 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-09, 10:08 PM   #38
StephenH
Uber Goober
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 11,326
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
"Fully faired you will laugh at the wind." There may be laughter involved, but I doubt that's the way it works.

I just crank on through at about 12 mph. Not much alternative on a single speed, though.

Actually, other things being similar, large people should have an advantage in the wind. As you scale things up and down, a person double the size in each direction would have 4 times the frontal area but 8 times the muscle, and should be able to go faster.
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 09:01 AM   #39
Riverside_Guy
Senior Member
 
Riverside_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC-UWS
Bikes: Trek 750
Posts: 373
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wasn't there a Stephen King short story called "Thinner?"

Speaking of headwinds (which I face) far better to have it going out than coming back (assuming the ride is out and back on the same route)!
Riverside_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 12:33 PM   #40
hairnet
Fresh Garbage
 
hairnet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes:
Posts: 12,551
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by flip18436572 View Post
I will always be a clydesdale because I am 6'3".
What?? Why do you think this?
hairnet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 12:37 PM   #41
Stray8
Senior Member
 
Stray8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Nueva York
Bikes:
Posts: 647
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Beat the wind? Stay indoors or simply change directions...






.
Stray8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 12:43 PM   #42
d4c4c8
Mike the Bike
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern CA
Bikes: Giant OCR C3/Gary Fisher Tasjahara
Posts: 190
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cod.peace View Post
Exactly. Fully faired you will laugh at the wind. Something like this Lightning F-40 would do nicely:
I'd break that poor thing in half. Last time I looked at their site it had a weight limit about 50# less than me.

I guess you could beat the wind with a big stick. that might work?
d4c4c8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 02:14 PM   #43
zoste
VoodooChile
 
zoste's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: AZ
Bikes: Salsa Casseroll
Posts: 1,048
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by flip18436572 View Post
I will always be a clydesdale because I am 6'3".
Quote:
Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
What?? Why do you think this?

According to Mr. Stormcrow in this thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe View Post
Why a Clydesdale? The term actually comes from the Triathlon World, for a male athlete over 200 pounds and/or over 6 feet tall. This was never a derogatory term, though. The Clydesdale is a massive and powerful charger, bred for battle originally; not hauling around a beer wagon, to carry an armored knight into combat. They were the time periods equivalent of the M1 Abrams Tank.....large, fast, and unstoppable.


Why an Athena? Look at Greek art, and the idealized form. The Greek culture portrayed the Goddess Athena as, well......statuesque. To be an Athena, you are not going to be a skinny little stick girl. Athena was the Patroness Goddess of Athens, and was not only the goddess of the gift of wisdom, she was a warrior Goddess, portrayed as a large, well muscled, strong and athletic woman that embodies the ideals of wisdom, knowledge, beauty, and strength. This term also comes from the Tri world, and is given to women over 150 pounds and/or 5'10".
Thus, because OP is taller than 6', he will always be a clyde.
zoste is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 02:17 PM   #44
flip18436572
Triathlon in my future???
Thread Starter
 
flip18436572's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Southwest Iowa
Bikes: Junk, that is why I am here. :-)
Posts: 2,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes, I am going by the over 6' tall being the limit. I plan on gettin under 200 at some point in this year or early in 2010, but I will forever be a clydesdale.
__________________
2007 Jamis Ventura Comp
2006 Jamis Explorer 2.0
2000 Specialized Hardrock (bought used)
Swim, Bike, Run and sounds like fun
flip18436572 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 02:35 PM   #45
Laggard
Lance Hater
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes:
Posts: 4,403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
I'd rather climb any mountain in the world than ride into the wind for any significant lenght of time. Wind is just demoralizing.

Then again, when it's behind you you feel like Tom Boonen. Sitting up, soft pedaling home at 27 mph.
Laggard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 02:48 PM   #46
ntime60
Senior Member
 
ntime60's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Indiana
Bikes: Trek 7.3FX
Posts: 94
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Does riding down a 2 mile grade @ 15 mph into a 15 mph head wind mean I'm going the equivalent of 30 mph? It sure feels like it.
ntime60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 03:03 PM   #47
tombailey
awaiting uci approval
 
tombailey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Alexandria, VA
Bikes: Fuji Roubaix RC 06
Posts: 961
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Not sure of the science but a harder gear/lower cadence is usually quicker for us bigger guys to push through a headwind. If speed is not you goal then spinning "up the horizontal hill" seems like the best technique.
tombailey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 04:10 PM   #48
Greg_R
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Bikes: Surly LHT set up for commuting
Posts: 646
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
run the big ring in the front and the rear and run at 15 mph
Maybe I'm misinterpreting this but are you saying that you're using the large gear in the front -and- the rear? If so, you may end up with some chain problems. Look up 'cross chaining'... it's not recommended.
Greg_R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 05:50 PM   #49
cinderellen
Junior Member
 
cinderellen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: oklahoma
Bikes: giant cypress, giant OCR1
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
+1 Try to think of it as a wonderful opportunity for increased training. You don't get stronger if it's easy.
cinderellen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-09, 08:53 PM   #50
flip18436572
Triathlon in my future???
Thread Starter
 
flip18436572's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Southwest Iowa
Bikes: Junk, that is why I am here. :-)
Posts: 2,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg_R View Post
Maybe I'm misinterpreting this but are you saying that you're using the large gear in the front -and- the rear? If so, you may end up with some chain problems. Look up 'cross chaining'... it's not recommended.
It was an example and cross chaining doesn't seem to be a problem on my double in the big ring on the front. I can hear it in the small gear on the front. It isn't something I do often but I can run Big/Big and not have any chain noise. No, it is not recommended, but it also is not far out of line for the chain when I look at it in that position.
__________________
2007 Jamis Ventura Comp
2006 Jamis Explorer 2.0
2000 Specialized Hardrock (bought used)
Swim, Bike, Run and sounds like fun
flip18436572 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:22 AM.