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  1. #1
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    Clyd trying to decide on a new bike - NEEDS HELP!!!

    I'm hoping someone out there has gone through this before. I'm 32 years old, 6'2, 225, and have been in sports most of my life. I've been riding a Bianchi Voipe frame for a while, but just recently ran my first sprint tri. I think I have found my next calling - not that I can swim or run very fast, but I like the training and can't beat the atmosphere and people.

    I want to buy a "real" road bike. I'm looking at a couple, but don't know if they are really for a guy my size.

    Pinarello FP 5
    Cervelo S3
    Wilier Cento Uno

    The price isn't a concern - I'm just looking for a great bike I can grow into and be happy with, and smoke my friends when I want to. Am I way off base?

  2. #2
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    At 225, you really won't have a problem with any road bike, honestly. Just keep your wheels properly tensioned, and you can even get away with low spoke count wheels. If you want bombproof wheels, get the bike equipped with some 32 spoke Velocity Deep V's.

    You will likely never have a frame issue, though.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


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  3. #3
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    I've read a lot of your posts, Tom, and appreciate your insight. But I don't think I am as worried about breakage as overall fit. Ever seen a 200 pound chick in a tube top?!!? I don't want to be that guy.

  4. #4
    Member Saint1970's Avatar
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    Bike choice

    Bigguy, I highly recommend a Ridley Excalibur. That is what I am riding and it is comparable to the Cervelo R3. I bought mine from Competitive Cyclist and the crew over there was outstanding in helping me make my choice. I have never been happier. The bike looks much better in person than it does in photos

  5. #5
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    For triathlon and time trial use, I'd definitely recommend you take a look at the Cervelo S2 and S3. Be aware that the S3 has issues with wheel+tire clearance. Make sure you understand the issues before purchasing...

    I did a 48-hour test of the S2 during Cervelo's recent Test&Win event. I have to say I was very skeptical about the aerodynamic benefits of the bike and I came away very impressed. Once I hit about 18mph, it was significantly easier to maintain speed on the S2 than it was on my Cervelo RS. With deep-section aerodynamic wheels (e.g. Zipp 404, Williams System 38) I suspect that the bike would be even more efficient. That said, the frame as a whole felt slightly less stiff than my RS. Not bad, mind you, just not quite as good. The aerodynamic seatpost, unfortunately, was a rock-solid and felt like riding a jackhammer: every little bump and pavement imperfection was transmitted directly to your butt. I was also unimpressed with the stock Shimano RS10 wheels. They work well enough on the flats, but their weight makes the bike climb like a brick. As I headed up my favorite hill, I literally pulled over twice to make sure the brakes weren't dragging!

    While I loved the aerodynamic efficiency of the S2, I just didn't think it was as much of an all-around bike as the R3 and RS. At the same time, it's not as good for triathlons and TTs as a dedicated bike like the Cervelo P2 or P3 would be. At this point, it might not be a bad idea to delay purchasing a bike until you decide how much triathlon training and racing you'll be doing...

  6. #6
    Tilting with windmills txvintage's Avatar
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    sstorkel brings up a good point about evaluating just how much racing, and what kind of racing, you will be doing. If you buy a dedicated Time Trial bike you will have an awesome purpose built bike but it ill be limited to training and racing since you won't be able to use it on group rides. A TT bike is not necessarily the most comfy thing to spend an afternoon on either.

    I think your idea of using a regular Road bike, with clip ons I assume, will give you a more versatile ride. I also like your initial shopping list. Very nice rides.

    I'm more of one to stray from the crowd and like your Wilier idea, as well as the Ridley suggestion. I would also look at the Noah from Ridley. Another suggestion that might float your boat and make you the only kid on the block that has one is a Moots. They are understated, but if you want every one to ooh and ahh, the Moots will do it.

    Truth be known, at the price point you are looking at none of them suck. Essentially, you can't make a bad decision with that line up so the best thing to do is ride them, see which one feels the best, and go for the bike that speaks to you.

    We will of course require many pics when you make your choice. High end race rigs elevate my resting heart rate, lol.

    EDIT: As Tom stated, at your weight you can ride any frame you want and lower spoke count wheels are in the game as well. The one thing you might want to avoid, however, are deep rimmed carbon wheels such as Zipp and Hed. You are probably about 40 lbs away from getting within the manufacturer recommended weight ranges. There are some really good aluminum light weight wheels that are pretty deep and aero as far as rims go.
    Last edited by txvintage; 08-29-09 at 05:23 AM.

  7. #7
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    You guys have been fantastic - Thanks.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by txvintage View Post
    ...
    EDIT: As Tom stated, at your weight you can ride any frame you want and lower spoke count wheels are in the game as well. The one thing you might want to avoid, however, are deep rimmed carbon wheels such as Zipp and Hed. You are probably about 40 lbs away from getting within the manufacturer recommended weight ranges. There are some really good aluminum light weight wheels that are pretty deep and aero as far as rims go.
    If he really wants Zipps his weight isn't a big issue with them. I've used them for years and am in the 220-240 range (depending on donut intake). One set of 404's I've had since 2002 just for the first time broke a spoke for the last month. They are used for ultra distance racing so they have tens of thousands of miles on them. I'm not too sure you can abuse wheels much more than I do. They get used rain, snow, desert heat, everything. I use a set of Zipps on my tandem as well! They are custom made though. If you are really worried about them, they make a Clydesdale version. Like any other wheel, if they are built properly you can get many happy miles out of them. The only HED wheels I own are the HED3 but I imagine that HED jets are similar quality to the Zipps.

    These wheels are expensive (worth it IMHO) but if you are doing crits I wouldn't use them. There are so many crashes in those races it isn't even funny. I'd be a shame to have an expensive wheel destroyed by some squid who is willing to take everyone out for a $5 trophy.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  9. #9
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Lots of bikes will be fine and you won't have problems finding one that fits you. But I would consider asking for recommendations for a store with a fitting service in your area, or even using an Internet one. Fit really matters with road bikes - a less good bike with the right fit is better than a the "best" bike with a wrong fit. It's a cheap way of safeguarding a major investment.

    Road bikes aren't my thing, but I thought the CAAD 9 was the default first road bike? I'd suggest looking around for a CAAD 9 or one its rivals and riding that for a few months before spending on a new high end bike - that way you'll know what your tastes and interests are before investing, and you'll get most of your money back on the used bike when you sell.

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