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  1. #1
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    Someone 330+ lbs., your help?

    My husband and I are looking to start cycling together. We're just starting out and are looking for something we can do together just to get in shape. He's 6'4" 330+ lbs. and athletic (he played college football, basketball, still works out 6 times a week, eats exceptionally well). So, there's no breathing problems etc. He is looking to take off some of the weight so he won't be so bulky. Neither one of us is experienced, and I found a Kona Hoss Menís Downhill Mountain Bike used. Ideally, we wanted to get a steel framed bike, but is this one ok for him with his weight? Also, we don't have a whole lot of money to drop right now, so the price is pretty ideal, but I want to make sure I'm getting him something that will be worth starting with - sturdy & reliable.

    Thanks-

  2. #2
    Senior Member bigvegan's Avatar
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    The Kona Hoss is sort of the Honda Civic of big guy mountain bikes, so it would be fine for him at his weight.

    Does he want a mountain bike though? If he's going to be riding off road / fire trails, then yes, but if he's going to be doing mostly road / path riding with you to get in shape, he might be a lot happier with a road/touring bike, as they're a lot faster, and you don't get the pogo stick effect from the front suspension that an MTB would have (although that can be locked down).

    If I were selling him a bike, I'd probably recommend a steel framed touring bike (something like this http://bikesdirect.com/products/windsor/tourist.htm), that'd be fast for the road, but would still be able to carry his weight comfortably.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Senior Member redvespablur's Avatar
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    Hi, I'm 6'4'' and 250 buy was 330 when I took up biking again after 20+ years relaxing.

    Early on the Hoss will be great I'm sure - or good enough to know if you like the biking. I started off on a cheapie Hybrid (that I broke and gave to wife) and then a somewhat less cheap hybrid with clipless pedals and then after 2 years of working up to it...

    A steel Surly Cross Check size 62 that is no my winter bike. Amd now a 20 year old Specialized Allez steel road bike with modern drivetrain.

    There is no end to the spend but ride what you have and figure out what kind of riding you enjoy and then look at craigslist for a deal and wait and wait but some big bike will show up at a silly price some time.

    Have fun.

  4. #4
    Senior Member exile's Avatar
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    If the Kona Hoss fits your husband and is also at a good price then get it. If you plan on ridng primarily on the roads you can get some slick tires and maybe some bar ends. If you want to start riding around on fire trails or dirt paths its pretty much good to go.

    If you and your husband are both new to bikes the most important thing is to get something that fits. A road or touring bike would be ideal if you are primarily using paved roads. If you both just want to get out and explore the hardtail mountain bike is a good all around bike. I am wary however of recommending craigslist to new people. If you do find something that might fit the bill then have an experienced friend go with you.

    You might also want to check LBS. Right now would be a good time to buy as they are selling off old inventory and getting ready for new arrivals. Also some shops do sell used items and would be a better place to help you for future concerns if you do buy from them.
    lil brown bat wrote:
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  5. #5
    Council of the Elders billydonn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigvegan View Post
    The Kona Hoss is sort of the Honda Civic of big guy mountain bikes, so it would be fine for him at his weight.

    Does he want a mountain bike though? If he's going to be riding off road / fire trails, then yes, but if he's going to be doing mostly road / path riding with you to get in shape, he might be a lot happier with a road/touring bike, as they're a lot faster, and you don't get the pogo stick effect from the front suspension that an MTB would have (although that can be locked down).

    If I were selling him a bike, I'd probably recommend a steel framed touring bike (something like this http://bikesdirect.com/products/windsor/tourist.htm), that'd be fast for the road, but would still be able to carry his weight comfortably.

    Good luck!
    That's good advice. In the beginning ride long and fairly slow and enjoy while avoiding injuries. Do not flog yourselves trying to be fast... that can come later if and when you want it.

    There is a time to resign oneself
    to old age and infirmity. You first.
    My Cycling Blogspot

  6. #6
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    For the bike to fit, saddle to pedal should = crotch to heel with straight leg. Almost any bike will be strong enough, but you should have a bike shop check the rear wheel spokes, that tension is up to spec and even all around.

  7. #7
    Love my Felt! notbrant's Avatar
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    Bought my Felt F95 when i weighed 330, no problems then or now, down to 275 now, good luck.
    2009 Felt F95 Team Issue

  8. #8
    Senior Member EKW in DC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewP View Post
    For the bike to fit, saddle to pedal should = crotch to heel with straight leg. Almost any bike will be strong enough, but you should have a bike shop check the rear wheel spokes, that tension is up to spec and even all around.
    +1 on all counts. People worry too much about the frame holding up. The frame is quite sturdy on just any bike that you'd be looking at.

    Good advice on fit and a wheel checkup, too. At around 300# and dropping, I can attest to the fact that the weak point on the bike for big guys is the rear wheel. Look for something with 36 spokes (pretty common on most mountain bikes). That'll help. And if you can, have a shop check the tension on the wheels. Proper tensioning can help get more life out of any wheels. Spend $20 now to check the tension and potentially save yourself headaches down the road with broken spokes and the prospect of getting a new wheel, which can be pricy.

    For now, follow the advice in this thread and enjoy cycling! It's a ton of fun!

  9. #9
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    Thank you all for your posts! On a side note, how did you some of you get your weight down from 300+ to the 270's? After showing my husband these posts, he was curious what you were incorportating into your lifestyles outside of cycling?

    Additional advice on brands, styles, and general cycling would be great, too. I really appreciate it.

    Thanks again,
    Tara

  10. #10
    Senior Member John Bailey's Avatar
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    I know you said price was an issue (believe me, we've all been there), but not sure where you might be with that. My advice would be to use a local bike shop (LBS) because their help in fit will be very valuable. Most of the good brands like Trek, Felt, Specialized, Giant, Kona, etc., will have good solid fitness or hybrid bikes in the $400 range right now. They may, also, have a used bike or two around that you can get cheaper. I started with a used Trek 820 mountain bike for $50. I added new tires for $50 and had the LBS do a check up for $50 and had a great bike for $150. My son is still riding it as a commuter in college. Going to a local LBS and staying with one of the standard brands will get you a good bike and save you a lot of trouble in the future.

    As far as losing weight. The important thing is to get out and ride and watch your diet. I've read where losing weight for cyclists is 80% diet and 20% exercise. I believe that. I think you diet to lose weight and you ride to be fit. I know it's not quite that simple, but I think it works that way for most. At first, you'll lose weight just because you're on the bike, the longer the better. It'll get harder to lose unless you also lower your calorie intake.

    Since my doctor convinced me to start riding 6 months ago, I've lost 42 lbs. Riding has become addictive to me, but I've not felt this good in decades. You can do it too. Just search through this site for the many inspirational threads about those who've lost, sometimes, 100's of lbs. With a bike, it can be done, and done with a lot of fun.


    John

  11. #11
    Senior Member redvespablur's Avatar
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    +1 on 80 diet 20 exercise split. I yo-yo'd like crazy with active summer bringing me down to 270 and winter eating bring me back to 300+. What worked this year was an iPhone app (free) called lose-it that allowed me to log food as I ate it so I could make real-time decisions about what to eat and when.

    Any change that is worth making should not be temporary - so make good changes and make for them life.

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