Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-02-10, 10:39 PM   #1
Yordipar
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Custom stem?

Uber-clyde (300 lbs) just upgraded tires to Big Apples and saddle to B190...both great. Have tried various handlebars, including cruiser bars, and now Titec Hbar, but really need to get the stem up another 2 inches or so to take pressure off hands/wrists. Already put on a steering tube extension. Adjustable stem is all the way adjusted up. Wish the bike would take a quill but wishing ain't enough. Any suggestions for more height on a modern style stem?
Yordipar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-10, 11:39 PM   #2
MilitantPotato
Subjectively Insane
 
MilitantPotato's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Saint Louis, Missouri
Bikes: '09 Rodriguez Adventurer Custom, '08 Trek 7.3Fx
Posts: 802
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wow, maybe hawk your current bike and get a cruiser off craigslist?
Extension + 30* 120-130mm stem is about all you'll get without buying a new fork with an uncut steerer tube.

I wonder how much stress having the bars up that high puts on the headtube?
MilitantPotato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-10, 11:45 PM   #3
FrenchFit 
The Left Coast, USA
 
FrenchFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 3,035
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
You're talking threadless stems, correct? Use a riser adaptor, they add 2.5 to 4+ inches depending on what you buy. Easy install, cheap and safe. You can find them on eBay. If you are talking threaded, then get a Nitto Techtronic, that can give you a ton of rise depending on which you get.

As far as adjustible stems, I really think much of those at all, very clunky.
FrenchFit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-10, 12:33 AM   #4
bigvegan
Senior Member
 
bigvegan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 659
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Are you on the right size bike?

Maybe you need a set of high-rise / BMX bars.
bigvegan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-10, 01:39 AM   #5
MilitantPotato
Subjectively Insane
 
MilitantPotato's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Saint Louis, Missouri
Bikes: '09 Rodriguez Adventurer Custom, '08 Trek 7.3Fx
Posts: 802
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigvegan View Post
Maybe you need a set of high-rise / BMX bars.
Come to think of it, I ran into a guy who had a badly injured back using that setup. He said it worked perfectly for him. Bars where about mid chest.
MilitantPotato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-10, 02:00 AM   #6
rykoala
Senior Member
 
rykoala's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 2,013
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I too need my handlebars way up there to take pressure off my hands. I'm looking at the bars on this site, made by wald. Here's the one I happen to have bookmarked.

http://www.bikeworldusa.com/product_...ebddc96136fccc
rykoala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-10, 07:12 AM   #7
DieselDan
Senior Member
 
DieselDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
Bikes: Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
Posts: 8,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Your trying to fix the problem in the wrong place. Tilt the nose of the saddle up to take pressure off hands, wrists, elbows and shoulders. Nothing radical, just enough to move your weight's distribution off your upper body onto your rear end. You can raise handle bars all day with infinite configurations, if you are constantly pushing your body weight back up onto the saddle, your hands, arms, elbows, and shoulders will hurt and you will hate cycling.
DieselDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-10, 06:28 PM   #8
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
Posts: 3,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan View Post
Your trying to fix the problem in the wrong place. Tilt the nose of the saddle up to take pressure off hands, wrists, elbows and shoulders. Nothing radical, just enough to move your weight's distribution off your upper body onto your rear end. You can raise handle bars all day with infinite configurations, if you are constantly pushing your body weight back up onto the saddle, your hands, arms, elbows, and shoulders will hurt and you will hate cycling.
+1... Bars don't push up against your hands, your hands push down into the bars... and often because the saddle is set pointing down and your weight is sliding forward.

Often, people will tilt their saddles down because they mistakenly think this will remove pressure from sensitive areas, but that is not how saddles are designed to work. And if a level saddle at the proper height is uncomfortable, try a different saddle.
LarDasse74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-10, 06:30 PM   #9
Go dog Go
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
http://www.bikyle.com/StemsRd.asp
Go dog Go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-10, 09:02 PM   #10
cyclist2000
Senior Member
 
cyclist2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Up
Bikes: Masi (retired), Giant TCR, Eisentraut, Jamis Aurora Elite, Zullo (trainer bike), Cannondale, 84 Stumpjumper, Waterford(N+1), Tern D8 (N+1), looking for a Ti frame
Posts: 3,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Get a new fork, don't cut the steerer. this should give you about 3 extra inches, if that isn't enough add your steerer extender again. When I got my new bike I told the guys at the shop not to cut the steerer so I can set it up really high. you could also get a salsa moto ace stem that has the 130 degree rise.
cyclist2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-10, 08:25 PM   #11
DieselDan
Senior Member
 
DieselDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
Bikes: Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
Posts: 8,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
Often, people will tilt their saddles down because they mistakenly think this will remove pressure from sensitive areas, but that is not how saddles are designed to work. And if a level saddle at the proper height is uncomfortable, try a different saddle.
Saddle tilt and nose angle are a personal preference. The nose of my saddles are noticeable tilted up, but nothing radical like a freestyle or trials bike. I know one pro rider, who has a few stage wins in the Tour de France and one day in yellow, that rides with his saddle pointing just slightly to the right! Getting fitted by a professional is always a good thing to do.
DieselDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-10, 08:40 PM   #12
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
Posts: 3,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyclist2000 View Post
get a salsa moto ace stem that has the 130 degree rise.
?????????
LarDasse74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-10, 08:41 PM   #13
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
Posts: 3,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan View Post
Saddle tilt and nose angle are a personal preference.
True, but nose pointed far down (except for a tri bike) is often a recipe for hand/wrist problems.
LarDasse74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-10, 09:51 AM   #14
Boyd Reynolds
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Chicago 'burbs
Bikes:
Posts: 216
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I can't add anything to the ergonomic solutions offered here, but I do have some experience with pressure on my hands. For me, it seems to be a problem of core strength. I have a long torso and a big belly, so there is a lot of weight to hold up, and my hands get sore. As I add power in my abs my hands feel better and better.

Crunches and planks. Bend elbows and straighten wrists. good luck.
Boyd Reynolds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-10, 10:24 AM   #15
wrk101
DRF aka Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: The NC Mountains
Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue, 87 Cimarron, 14 frame school custom, 73 Paramount
Posts: 19,973
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
+1 Raise the nose of the seat.

+2 Sounds like frame size is too small if you want that much rise on the stem. How much seat post do you have showing?
wrk101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-10, 05:34 PM   #16
DieselDan
Senior Member
 
DieselDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
Bikes: Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
Posts: 8,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
True, but nose pointed far down (except for a tri bike) is often a recipe for hand/wrist problems.
I said that back at #7.
DieselDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-10, 05:50 PM   #17
Herbie53
Senior Member
 
Herbie53's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 7,142
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
This thread would be way better with some photos... anybody have some pics of how they have / had their bikes set up to manage a more upright position?
Herbie53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-10, 06:33 PM   #18
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
Posts: 3,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan View Post
I said that back at #7.
... and I agreed with you at #8.
LarDasse74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-10, 07:15 PM   #19
heckler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: South Jersey
Bikes:
Posts: 2,023
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
what kind of bike, saddle, and riding style?

If you are trying to make a road bike more of a cruiser first level out the saddle... if needed lower the whole seat to get the bars up relative to your seating position. Since you already have an adjustable stem all the way up I would assume that your seat could be lowered to the point of you having a negative drop.

This would only be ok for cruising around and may be uncomfortable for long durations.
heckler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-10, 11:27 PM   #20
MikeWinVA
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Northern/Central VA
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus, Univega Activa ST Hybrid, 70's Schwinn Traveler, Giant Innova, Nishiki Mixte
Posts: 213
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Put the bike against the garage door. Take a picture and we can give you some better ideas. Try adding ergo grips and using padded gloves. I have good luck with Pearl Izumi gloves and Specialized Grips.

This is what I did when I started:



I have since lowered the stem angle and sunk the stem further into the head tube. I'd get an updated picture, but that would involve slogging through 12 inches of snow right now. If you want me to get you the stem info, let me know.



BTW: I know the frame is too small for me...working on that.

Last edited by MikeWinVA; 02-05-10 at 11:44 PM. Reason: badly speling
MikeWinVA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-10, 11:54 AM   #21
cyclist2000
Senior Member
 
cyclist2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Up
Bikes: Masi (retired), Giant TCR, Eisentraut, Jamis Aurora Elite, Zullo (trainer bike), Cannondale, 84 Stumpjumper, Waterford(N+1), Tern D8 (N+1), looking for a Ti frame
Posts: 3,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
?????????
the Salsa site list the degree bend on the moto ace mountain 1-1/8 as 130, I am assuming that is from vertical.
cyclist2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:09 PM.