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  1. #26
    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
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    When you are pedaling hard, the suspension will bob up and down. That motion is energy that isn't getting transfered through the pedals to the rear wheel.

    50 mile rides aren't going to be EASY for awhile unless you are already a long distance runner (I'm guessing not in this forum). It will take time for your body to get comfortable on the bike . Any bike that you are comfortable on is a good distance bike. Take a look at what the guys in the long distance riding and touring sections of the forum ride.
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  2. #27
    Senior Member Laserman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    I never knew that suspension forks can hinder and reduce the speed of a bicycle. (...)
    Dude, as a beginning cyclist the amount of "speed reduction" and "hindering" would be impossible for you to quantify even if there were a million dollar prize attached.

    The sensible thing for you to do is ride what you have while you enjoy riding it, then if you think you want or need another bike go to your local bike shops and test ride all the bikes they say will fit you. No one else can decide if you like a particular bike.
    Set phasers to butt-whup!

  3. #28
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Stay away from the Motobecane/bikesdirect.com bikes unless you are a competent mechanic with a well stocked tool box or live near a Cycle Spectrum store.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  4. #29
    Senior Member EKW in DC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    I went on the TREK website and looked at the Trek Navigator 3.0. The drivetrain information that it gives on this bicycle is as follows:

    Shifters: Shimano EF60 - 8 speed, Front Derailleur: Shimano M191,
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano Alivio, Crank: Shimano M191 48/38/28 w/chainguard, Cassette: SRAM PG830 11-32, 8 speed, Pedals: Dual density platform

    Under "Shifters" and "Cassette" section it states that this bike has "8 Speeds". Am I reading it wrong?
    Yes. And you're just not understanding the explanation that I posted. Let me try again.

    Using your own quote from the Trek website:

    Crank: Shimano M191 48/38/28 w/chainguard, Cassette: SRAM PG830 11-32

    So, for the Trek, there are three chainwheels (gears) in the crankset (in front by the pedals) w/ 48, 38 and 28 teeth respecively.

    There are also eight gears on the rear cassette. We'll call them: 11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32. That is, the number of teeth on the gears - one cog has 11, the next 13, and so on to 32.

    So, theoretically at any given time the chain could be on any one of these chainrings and any one of the 8 gears in the rear.

    Ergo, possible combinations are

    48 w/ any of the following - 11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32
    38 w/ any of the following - 11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32
    28 w/ any of the following - 11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32

    That's eight possible combinations (read speeds) using the 48 tooth chainwheel (48--11, 48--13, 48--15, .. , 48--32)
    Eight using the 38 tooth chainwheel (38--11, 38--13, 38--15, .. , 38--32)
    And eight using the 28 tooth chainwheel (28--11, 28--13, 28--15, .. , 28--32)
    Each of these combinations represents a "speed"

    8+8+8 (or 8*3) = 24 speeds

    You may also find the pages linked to below instructive. Sheldon had a way of explaining things better and more clearly than just about anyone else could/can. (Bookmark his site, and refer to it often. It's a treasure trove of information.) He also points out some caveats to the nomenclature of speeds.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_sp-ss.html#speeds
    http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_cn-z.html#crankset
    http://sheldonbrown.com/gears.html

    Hope this helps clear things up for you.

    PS-Again, I urge you not to rush into a bicycle purchase, especially if you're still learning some of these mechanical concepts. Give your current bike some time. Learn what you can about bikes, about your riding style, etc., and figure out better what you want. If you plop down $600 on a Trek Navigator now and decide in three months that a touring bike is more to your liking, then you'll have $600 less with which to purchase a good touring bike.
    Last edited by EKW in DC; 02-17-10 at 11:18 AM.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    Shifters: Shimano EF60 - 8 speed, Front Derailleur: Shimano M191,
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano Alivio, Crank: Shimano M191 48/38/28 w/chainguard, Cassette: SRAM PG830 11-32, 8 speed, Pedals: Dual density platform

    Under "Shifters" and "Cassette" section it states that this bike has "8 Speeds". Am I reading it wrong? I see the 8 speed listed and I am assuming that the bike is an 8 speed bike. I am doing the same thing with all the other bicycles that are on my list which I like. When I go into their respective website I see written that they are either a 7 speed or an 8 speed or a 24 speed when I look under the drive train information section. Maybe I am reading it wrong? If I am reading it wrong then why does it mention that the bike has 8 speeds? I am kind of confused about this and how to read and interpret the speeds on each othe the bicycles which I have in my list that I like.

    It is confusing bicycle terminology. The thing you need to understand is that most hybrid, comfort, mountain, and touring bikes have three chainrings and on the crank in the front (see red highlight, above) in addition to the 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11 speeds on the cassette in the rear.
    [TOTAL NUMBER OF SPEEDS] = [NUMBER OF CHAINRINGS] X [NUMBER OF COGS ON CASSETTE].

    Some bikes do only have one chainring, though, so they truly are 3 or 7 or 8 speed bikes, and typically these bikes (especially hybrid or comfort style bikes) are not ideal for a recreational cyclist who has to go up and down hills.

    The confusion comes because, for the purpose of maintenance, people refer to only the number of cogs as the type of drivetrain, because that is how replacement parts are catagorized - an "9 speed chain" is the chain that goes on a bike with 9 cogs in the rear, regardless of the number of chainrings in the front.
    Edit: The number of cogs can also be an indicator of general component quality on a bike - modern bikes with 6 or 7 cogs tend to be lower quality; 8 cogs are normally found on modern 'entry level' bikes; 9, 10, and 11 cogs are generally on higher quality bikes. So manufacturers will simply say "9 speed drivetrain" although the bike actually has 18 or 27 speeds.

    I appologize on behalf of the bicycle industry for this confusion.
    Last edited by LarDasse74; 02-17-10 at 10:59 AM.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieselDan View Post
    Stay away from the Motobecane/bikesdirect.com bikes unless you are a competent mechanic with a well stocked tool box or live near a Cycle Spectrum store.

    Are the Motobecane bicycles problematic bikes? Do they break down frequently and need servicing a lot? Tell me why I need to stay away from the Motobecane bicycles. If the Motobecane bicycles are not as good as the Trek 7000, 7100, 7200, the Navigator 3.0 and the Kona, then I will keep away from the Motobecane brand.
    Is the Trek 7000, the Trek 7100, the Trek 7200, the Trek Navigator 3.0 and the Kona Smoke much better bikes than the Motobecane bikes? What do the Trek 7000, 7100, Trek 7200, Trek Navigator 3.0 and the Kona Smoke bikes have which is better quality than the Motobecane bikes?

    If you were to choose from the Trek 7100, the Trek Navigator 3.0 or the Trek 7200 "with" the suspension forks and from the Trek 7000 "without" the suspension forks and from the Kona Smoke, which bicycle would be the bicycle of your 1st choice and which would be the bicycle of your 2nd choice out of the 4 models that I listed here?

    Before you answer this question you must remember that the 2 bicycles of choice that you select will be used for long distance riding (25 to 50+ miles of riding during each bike ride) as well as for riding on dirt roads and on unpaved roads as well as on bike paths and for regular street riding and commuting where the roads are paved. Also remember that I want the bike to be comfortable enough to be able to ride for very long distances. Another thing of importance to me is that I want the 2 bicycles of choice that you select to have decent speed capabilities. I don't want them to be sluggish or too slow or hard to ride during the long 25 to 50+ rides and cruises that I will be using them for. Keep in mind that I am not looking for a racing bike, but I don't want my bike to be slow either. I want the bike to be able to gain speed easily and to be able to attain high speeds as well as to be able to get me where I want to go quickly. I don't want the bike to be a sluggish slow poke.
    From all the requirements that I want which I am looking for in a bicycle that I mentioned above, which bicycle would be your 1st choice and which your 2nd choice out of the 4 Treks (7000, 7100, 7200, Navigator 3.0) and the Kona Smoke?
    Last edited by scottbrown; 02-17-10 at 12:44 PM.

  7. #32
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    My reccomendation:

    Get one of the bikes with no suspension fork! Heavier riders are often too heavy for entry-level forks, and most of the travel is used up in sag before you ever hit a bump.

    Which bike without a suspension fork? Both are well suited for the type of riding you describe, so you should choose based on how the bikes feel to ride, or if you still can't decide, then the shop you would rather buy the bike at.

    The reason why people warn against Motobecane and Bikesdirect is not because the bikes are low quality - the quality is fine - but because the bikes come partially assembled, and any maintenance problems you have you have to solve yourself, whereas when a bike is purchased at an LBS, they will often do adjustments and some repairs for free for a time after purchase. And just about all bikes need some repairs or adjustments after or during the bikes break-in period.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
    My reccomendation:

    Get one of the bikes with no suspension fork! Heavier riders are often too heavy for entry-level forks, and most of the travel is used up in sag before you ever hit a bump.

    Which bike without a suspension fork? Both are well suited for the type of riding you describe, so you should choose based on how the bikes feel to ride.
    Okay, this leaves me with 2 bicycles left to choose from. They are the Trek 7000 "without" the suspension fork and the Kona Smoke. What do you think are the "pros" and "cons" for both the Trek 7000 and the Kona Smoke? What similarities and differences does each bike have with one another?
    Would each of these 2 bikes be suitable for "all" of my needs and requirements that I listed above (long distance 25 to 50+ miles of riding during each ride, comfortable ride, excellent speed capabilities, ability to ride on dirt roads & unpaved roads as well as on bike paths and on regular paved streets, ability for the bike to hold up well and be durable, ect.)?

    If you were to make a choice and to purchase either the Trek 7000 or the Kona Smoke, which of the 2 bikes would you get and why? What do you like and dislike about each of these bikes? I would love to hear your "detailed" input on each of these bikes.

    THANK YOU
    Last edited by scottbrown; 02-17-10 at 12:58 PM.

  9. #34
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    I went on the TREK website and looked at the Trek Navigator 3.0. The drivetrain information that it gives on this bicycle is as follows:

    Shifters: Shimano EF60 - 8 speed, Front Derailleur: Shimano M191,
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano Alivio, Crank: Shimano M191 48/38/28 w/chainguard, Cassette: SRAM PG830 11-32, 8 speed, Pedals: Dual density platform



    Under "Shifters" and "Cassette" section it states that this bike has "8 Speeds". Am I reading it wrong? I see the 8 speed listed and I am assuming that the bike is an 8 speed bike. I am doing the same thing with all the other bicycles that are on my list which I like. When I go into their respective website I see written that they are either a 7 speed or an 8 speed or a 24 speed when I look under the drive train information section. Maybe I am reading it wrong? If I am reading it wrong then why does it mention that the bike has 8 speeds? I am kind of confused about this and how to read and interpret the speeds on each othe the bicycles which I have in my list that I like.
    The 8 speed refers to the rear cog, the crank information shows that there are 3 sprockets, one with 48 teeth, one with 38 teeth and one with 28 teeth. This is a 24 speed bike 3 x 8= 24. Each front sprocket can be used with each rear cog, there are 24 different combinations.

    The 8 speed shifter is only the right shifter, the cassette has 8 cogs (gears)

    always multiply the sprockets (on crank) with the cogs (on cassette)and the result is the number of speeds.

    PS. Just noticed that EKW and LarDasse74 has provided a very good explanation of this subject, disreguard this if it adds to the confusion.
    Last edited by cyclist2000; 02-17-10 at 03:13 PM.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
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  10. #35
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=scottbrown;10414319]I would like to be able to bike ride 50+ miles at any given time without feeling uncomfortable while riding and pedaling. I would want the bike to feel comfortable and I would also want it to be ergonomic if I am going to go long distances on it.

    Also, I would want the bike to be heavy duty enough to be able to be used on dirt roads and on unpaved roads as well as on bike paths and on regular paved streets. I also want to be able to easily gain speed on the bike while doing long distance riding or cruising. I don't want the bike to be sluggish or slow. QUOTE]

    Your not asking too much from one single bike are you?

    Comfort is a very personal subjective view and will definitely depend on your fitness.

    The following is purely my own personal view from my riding experience. Yours may very greatly.

    I would not be comfortable on any of these bikes. I prefer bike with drop bars for any distance (I like the different hand positions available with drop bars and aero bars). I don't like the upright riding position (it tends to shift the body weight to the butt). The mountain bike crank is too small for my road riding and I will feel like I am really slow and pedaling all day. The tires are too wide for my liking (especially on the Kona), I narrower tires.

    But I am picky and I think that I know what I like.

    If I was looking for a bike with all this criteria of feeling not sluggish or slow, can ride in gravel or dirt roads, comfortable and use it to ride distance, I would look for a cyclecross bike. And I might not like those bikes either.

    I would follow the advice of not buying a bike yet and trying out a LOT of bikes and different style of bikes. No offense but I don't think what you are looking at is what you are discribing.

    Then again, what do I know about your or your riding style? you may be perfectly happy with the upright riding style (many people are), you may spin at high rpm and the mtb crank aren't a problem, you may like to just use the single hand grip or plan on adding bar ends for added hand positions. I may be full of baloney.
    Last edited by cyclist2000; 02-17-10 at 03:47 PM.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
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  11. #36
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    Cyclist2000,
    You raise some very good points in your post above. The reason why I like to ride in the upright position is because I sometimes have lower back pain. I have a herniated disc in my lower back and have had this problem for the last 25+ years. I have been working out at the gym for the last 2 1/2 years doing the elliptical machine (the ski machine as I call it) for 1 hour every other day about 3 times a week. I usually put stress on my legs by putting the machine on level 16. I have been trying to strengthen my legs and body for the last 2 1/2 years so I can be able to start bicycle riding in the springtime.
    I prefer the upright position because my body and back would feel uncomfortable riding in a forward position over the handlebars.

    I am not going to rush to get a bicycle. I will go to the various bicycle shops in my area and look around and sit on a few bikes to see how they feel. I need to get a feel of the bike first. Then if the bike feels well, I will take it for a spin to see if I feel comfortable riding it. If my body feels awkward while sitting and while riding the bike, then I will look at another bike. I've come to a conclusion here that I will either get a comfort cruiser or a hybrid bike. I am leaning towards the Trek 7000, the Trek 7100, the Trek 7200, the Trek Navigator 3.0, the Trek Allant "urban style" bike and the Kona Smoke. I will need to seek and check out ALL of these 6 bikes in order to determine which ones I am comfortable with and which ones that I don't like.

    For the time being, I will be using my AVIGO RIALTO 7 Speed up until I make a decision as to which bicycle I will purchase. I am hoping that by the mid to late summertime that I can get either one of the Trek bikes that are in my list or the Kona Smoke.

    I have been spending many hours online doing lots of research on a lot of bikes and I've narrowed down my choices to 6 bikes that I like. The bikes that I listed in this thread are the only bikes that I really like. I like them because they are appealing style-wise to me and because they also seem to be decent utility bicycles.
    Last edited by scottbrown; 02-17-10 at 04:23 PM.

  12. #37
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    Are the Motobecane bicycles problematic bikes? Do they break down frequently and need servicing a lot? Tell me why I need to stay away from the Motobecane bicycles. If the Motobecane bicycles are not as good as the Trek 7000, 7100, 7200, the Navigator 3.0 and the Kona, then I will keep away from the Motobecane brand.
    Is the Trek 7000, the Trek 7100, the Trek 7200, the Trek Navigator 3.0 and the Kona Smoke much better bikes than the Motobecane bikes? What do the Trek 7000, 7100, Trek 7200, Trek Navigator 3.0 and the Kona Smoke bikes have which is better quality than the Motobecane bikes?
    The quality of the bike is not in question. If you had turned your comprehension knob up, you do NOT get a shop assembled bike off a UPS truck. You, the customer, must assemble, or pay a shop, to assemble your bike. You will NOT get any free tune ups or local dealer support. The only exception is buying from bikesdirect.com's retail store, Cycles Spectrum.

    I have a Motobecane Messenger. After 30 miles, the bottom bracket was toast. I had to buy and replace the bottom bracket cartridge myself, or pay my local shop to do the job for $60 parts and labor. Well, I was able to buy a new cartridge at dealer cost from the job I had at the time, and I am a bike mechanic with the fully-stocked toolbox. These amount to big savings for me.

    There is more then just assembly once you receive a bike from bikesdirect.com. You install the front wheel, pedals, stem, handlebar, seat and post, but then you have to hook up and adjust the front brake, then adjust the rear brake. Often the headset needs to be adjusted. Derailleurs are rarely ever adjusted properly from the factory. The wheels will probably need truing and crank arms torqued. On a few occasions, you will have to replace a tube and/or tire. Can you diagnose a bent frame or fork? Bikes get thrown around pretty hard by package handlers.

    Bikes shops will assemble the bike and take car of all the above issues. Something that will not happen if you order a bike off the internet with one exception: Worksman Bicycles, but those will come off an LTL carrier, and those are expensive shipping charges.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    Cyclist2000,
    You raise some very good points in your post above. The reason why I like to ride in the upright position is because I sometimes have lower back pain. I have a herniated disc in my lower back and have had this problem for the last 25+ years. I have been working out at the gym for the last 2 1/2 years doing the elliptical machine (the ski machine as I call it) for 1 hour every other day about 3 times a week. I usually put stress on my legs by putting the machine on level 16. I have been trying to strengthen my legs and body for the last 2 1/2 years so I can be able to start bicycle riding in the springtime.
    I prefer the upright position because my body and back would feel uncomfortable riding in a forward position over the handlebars.

    I am not going to rush to get a bicycle. I will go to the various bicycle shops in my area and look around and sit on a few bikes to see how they feel. I need to get a feel of the bike first. Then if the bike feels well, I will take it for a spin to see if I feel comfortable riding it. If my body feels awkward while sitting and while riding the bike, then I will look at another bike. I've come to a conclusion here that I will either get a comfort cruiser or a hybrid bike. I am leaning towards the Trek 7000, the Trek 7100, the Trek 7200, the Trek Navigator 3.0, the Trek Allant "urban style" bike and the Kona Smoke. I will need to seek and check out ALL of these 6 bikes in order to determine which ones I am comfortable with and which ones that I don't like.

    For the time being, I will be using my AVIGO RIALTO 7 Speed up until I make a decision as to which bicycle I will purchase. I am hoping that by the mid to late summertime that I can get either one of the Trek bikes that are in my list or the Kona Smoke.

    I have been spending many hours online doing lots of research on a lot of bikes and I've narrowed down my choices to 6 bikes that I like. The bikes that I listed in this thread are the only bikes that I really like. I like them because they are appealing style-wise to me and because they also seem to be decent utility bicycles.
    Whichever bike you get, if it fits it will be worlds more fun to ride than your AVIGO RIALTO 7 SPEED (I put mine in italics ) - faster, lighter, better brakes... etc. etc. etc...

    ... As long as you use the bike, fit on the bike, and take care of the bike.

  14. #39
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    Cyclist2000,
    You raise some very good points in your post above. The reason why I like to ride in the upright position is because I sometimes have lower back pain. I have a herniated disc in my lower back and have had this problem for the last 25+ years. I have been working out at the gym for the last 2 1/2 years doing the elliptical machine (the ski machine as I call it) for 1 hour every other day about 3 times a week. I usually put stress on my legs by putting the machine on level 16. I have been trying to strengthen my legs and body for the last 2 1/2 years so I can be able to start bicycle riding in the springtime.
    I prefer the upright position because my body and back would feel uncomfortable riding in a forward position over the handlebars.

    I am not going to rush to get a bicycle. I will go to the various bicycle shops in my area and look around and sit on a few bikes to see how they feel. I need to get a feel of the bike first. Then if the bike feels well, I will take it for a spin to see if I feel comfortable riding it. If my body feels awkward while sitting and while riding the bike, then I will look at another bike. I've come to a conclusion here that I will either get a comfort cruiser or a hybrid bike. I am leaning towards the Trek 7000, the Trek 7100, the Trek 7200, the Trek Navigator 3.0, the Trek Allant "urban style" bike and the Kona Smoke. I will need to seek and check out ALL of these 6 bikes in order to determine which ones I am comfortable with and which ones that I don't like.

    For the time being, I will be using my AVIGO RIALTO 7 Speed up until I make a decision as to which bicycle I will purchase. I am hoping that by the mid to late summertime that I can get either one of the Trek bikes that are in my list or the Kona Smoke.

    I have been spending many hours online doing lots of research on a lot of bikes and I've narrowed down my choices to 6 bikes that I like. The bikes that I listed in this thread are the only bikes that I really like. I like them because they are appealing style-wise to me and because they also seem to be decent utility bicycles.
    Scott,

    I also had a herniated disk in my L4-L5. I have had the surgery to remove the herniation and relieve the pressure on the nerve. I just want to mention two things.
    1) When I had back pain, I would ride my road bike to feel better. I think that the extended position would stretch my back and relieve pressure on the herniation.
    2) When riding in an upright position, the normal bumps and cracks would send a shock straight up the spine causing more pain and aggravation to the herniation. This is just my viewpoint.

    I would just encourage you to also try some bikes with drop bars, few people ride on the drops any amount of the time, most of the time the hands are at the top of the bars or on the brake hoods. I am not trying to convince you that what you are looking at is wrong but think that you should just keep your options open.

    The main thing is to get a good fitting bike that you feel comfortable about. The better you feel about the bike the more you will ride it. This decision is and should be about you.

    Good luck on getting the right bike for yourself. Have a lot of fun.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bustercrb/sets/72157623483647522/

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclist2000 View Post
    Scott,

    I also had a herniated disk in my L4-L5. I have had the surgery to remove the herniation and relieve the pressure on the nerve. I just want to mention two things.
    1) When I had back pain, I would ride my road bike to feel better. I think that the extended position would stretch my back and relieve pressure on the herniation.
    2) When riding in an upright position, the normal bumps and cracks would send a shock straight up the spine causing more pain and aggravation to the herniation. This is just my viewpoint.

    I would just encourage you to also try some bikes with drop bars, few people ride on the drops any amount of the time, most of the time the hands are at the top of the bars or on the brake hoods. I am not trying to convince you that what you are looking at is wrong but think that you should just keep your options open.

    The main thing is to get a good fitting bike that you feel comfortable about. The better you feel about the bike the more you will ride it. This decision is and should be about you.

    Good luck on getting the right bike for yourself. Have a lot of fun.

    Cyclist2000,
    I agree with you. I ALSO have a herniated disc, but I am trying to take care of my back thru exercise by going to the gym and doing some mild exercise. I definitely want the bike to feel comfortable for me while I am riding it. The AVIGO RIALTO that I currently own is an "okay" bike. It's more comfortable than the average mountain bike that I've sat on. The main problem that I have on bicycles is the seat. Most mountain bikes that I've sat on were very uncomfortable because the seat dug into my groin and rear end. I like the wider seats like the ones on the old English touring bikes. My current AVIGO RIALTO'S seat is not uncomfortable, but it's also not 100% comfortable either. But overall, the bike feels comfortable "position wise" for my bodywhen I tried riding it inside ToysRUs. The moment that I sit on a bike, I can for the most part feel if it feels comfortable and if it's a good fit for me. If the seat starts giving me discomfort when I start riding my bike, I will just buy a more comfortable seat. I like the wider comfort seats.

    I'm hoping that the 2nd bike that I choose to buy will come with a very comfortable seat and that it will feel comfortable and have a good feel and fit when I sit on it and when I am riding it. That's why I am leaning towards the Kona Smoke and the Trek "Comfort" and "Urban" bikes. I need to try them all out and see which one(s) are the best feel and fit for me. I want to be able to get a lot of use out of the bike and to also be able to enjoy it for many many years. I don't want to have to keep purchasing a brand new bike every so often if you know what I mean.

  16. #41
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    Cyclist2000,
    I don't want to have to keep purchasing a brand new bike every so often if you know what I mean.
    I am the person that thinks getting a new bike every couple of years is a great idea. I have 8 bikes that are used for different purposes. (thats why I made the comment about wanting the bike to do a lot of things.)

    you can see them here

    There are some road bikes, a mountain bike, hybrid, and touring bike, I don't have any comfort bikes or cruisers.

    Well enough of showing off,

    Good luck on finding your new bike
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bustercrb/sets/72157623483647522/

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