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  1. #1
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    Please Help. Which Bicycle do you recommend for a 263 LB Clydsdale like me?

    Greetings to all in here. I want to first say that I am new here on this forum website. I never knew that the Clydesdale forum that's on this website was for big guys like me. I am so very glad that I found this place. I am just starting out to get into bicycling and I want to become an avid cyclist and to do this as a form of exercising as well as a hobby.

    I already purchased a bicycle for myself to start out. The bike that I bought is a cheaper brand AVIGO RIALTO 26" inch, 7 speed comfort bike. My AVIGO RIALTO will be used for regular bike trail and street/commuting.

    After reading many threads here in the Clydesdale section of the website, I am starting to become concerned about the different selection of bicycles for myself because of my weight.
    I currently weigh at 263.5 LBS with my clothes and shoes on and I am 5' feet and 11" inches tall. Even though I already own a bicycle, I will more than likely be in the market to purchase another "better quality" bicycle later on in the spring or summertime as I progress into doing more serious cycling. I am worried that my choices of bicycles that will be available to choose from will be limited because of my weight.

    I have been looking online a lot at the various bicycles which I think that I like. The bicycles which I am really interested in that I like the most are mainly Comfort bikes. I will be doing mostly bike trail and street/commuting on my bicycle. I more than likely will not be doing any mountain biking, but I would like the bike that I get to be durable enough to ride and take on an unpaved dirt road if necessary. I don't mind owning a mountain bike, but I like the old English style bikes better than the mountain bikes. I've tried out a few mountain bikes and I find that they are not very comfortable either because of the seats being uncomfortable or because of the leaning forward that I need to do while pedaling a mountain bike. I would rather be in sitting position rather than a bent over or a forward bent over position while pedaling a bicycle. I want the bike that I choose to feel comfortable when I ride it. Especially if I am going to be spending a few hours at a time riding it. The current AVIGO RIALTO 7 Speed which I own right now is very comfortable to sit on and ride. I would like the 2nd bike that I choose to also feel nice and comfortable to sit on and to ride too just like my AVIGO RIALTO does.


    Below I have a list of the bikes which I like that I would choose from when I am ready to make my purchase. They are:

    1. 2009 Breezer Freedom Hybrid 3 Speed Comfort Bike

    2. Schwinn Johnny Coasting 3 Speed

    3. Schwinn Willy 7 Speed Comfort Bike

    4. 2009 Nova Transfer 7 Speed with the internal rear hub

    5. Pake Urban 6 Speed (www.pakebikes.com)

    6. 2009 Raleigh Detour Deluxe 24 Speed with Disc brakes


    I've noticed that all or most of the bicycles which I like that I listed above have "skinny" tires and rims. After reading a lot of the posts in the Clydesdale section of this forum, I am starting to worry that the bicycle choices that I've narrowed down to which I listed above that I like might pose a problem because of my 236.5 LBS weight. I am afraid that the rims, the tires or even the bike frame might not be able to sustain my current weight. I really don't want to have to choose a mountain bike if I don't have to. I would prefer to get a comfort bike with a durable frame, durable rims and durable tires that can sustain my weight and that can be driven on bike paths and/or on unpaved dirt roads and on the street/pavement for commuting. I am currently on a tight budget and I want to spend between $300 to $700 or less if I can.

    I would like to know whether or not the bicycles that I've listed above will be good choices for me if you take my weight into consideration? Which bicycles that are in the list do you think will be suitable for me? What weaknesses do each of the bicycles that I listed above have?

    Which other comfort bicycles do you recommend? Also, if you think that the mountain bike route is better for me, which mountain bikes do you recommend for me? I hope that you will be able to help me so I can have an easier time making a decision to choose a decent bicycle for myself for my needs. Your input will be greatly appreciated.

    THANK YOU

  2. #2
    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
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    LITTLE RED LIGHTHOUSE, NYC1.jpg2009 FUJI NEWEST 1.0.jpgIf you're happy with your 1st bike, just stick with that for now. If you develop any problems it will probably be the rear rim.
    I'm 200 lbs. and with my riding gear and bike accessories; I'm probably putting on 220 lbs. on my bike(my winter boots alone
    I think are over 5 lbs.). I bought my bike brand new and after a month started having problems with the rear rim, popped a
    spoke at first then would never stay true after that. Replaced the rim with a more sturdy aero rim(VELOCITY DEEP V), problem solved.
    As far as your 2nd bike choice, I would go with the last one, 24 speeds will help you a lot going uphill(compared w/ a 3 or 7 speed).

  3. #3
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    Of the ones you mentioned, Raleigh and Breezer are the most likely "quality" choices and likely have the better quality wheels. More gears are usually better, you want to spin the pedals not mash them.

    The bike you have now looks like it has pretty sturdy wheels. Just avoid curbs and pot holes, and if you can't, stand on the pedals to shift more weight to the front wheel.

    Ride what you have for now, and start looking in 6 months once you have a feel for what you want and how far your fitness level has increased.

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    Where do you live? Is it flat or are there hills? If it's flat you may be okay with most any of them. But some you listed only have 3 speeds, some only have 7. Not a wide range of gearing if you live where things aren't flat...

  5. #5
    Born Again Pagan irclean's Avatar
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    I would suggest doing as much riding as you can on your current bike before plunking down $300-$700 on a new bike. After you feel more confident and comfortable riding go out and test ride as many different bikes as you can. In time you may just decide that you like mountain bikes after all, or hybrids, or road bikes. Of your list I prefer the Raleigh, but then again I own a rigid Raleigh mountain bike from the 90's that I love. I don't do any off-roading so I installed some slick tires to improve its ride and it makes a great second bike. I also installed some riser handlebars to give me a more upright riding position. The Detour Deluxe is marketed as a Hybrid and I have a similar bike made by Schwinn. Don't worry about the skinnier tires not being able to support your weight; mine has 700 x 35mm tires and holds my 300 lbs. just fine. My wheels have 36 spokes, which is great for strength, and I believe that all the Detour bikes have 36 spokes as well. Just make sure whichever bike you buy that your LBS has trued the wheels and tensioned the spokes for you, and go back a month later to have them do it again. Good luck and ride safe!
    Gettin' my Fred on.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeWinVA View Post
    The bike you have now looks like it has pretty sturdy wheels. Just avoid curbs and pot holes, and if you can't, stand on the pedals to shift more weight to the front wheel.

    Ride what you have for now, and start looking in 6 months once you have a feel for what you want and how far your fitness level has increased.

    Are you familiar with the AVIGO RIALTO 7 Speed which I currently own? What can you tell me about my bicycle? Do you think that it's a decent bicycle and that it will not fall apart? Even though it's a cheap low priced bicycle, I really love it a lot. I like the styling of my bike a lot. I also like the fact that it's got wide tires and a very comfortable seat with a very good feel when I ride it. I'm hoping that my current bike will last me many years and that it will not fall apart like some of other cheaper bicycles out there. I paid under $100 for it. I intend to put it thru lots of usage and ride it a lot once the weather gets better and when there is no salt on the roads. I want to get a lot of usage out of my current AVIGO RIALTO 7 speed.
    I would really like to buy a better quality bicycle later on in the summer once I put some mileage and usage on the current AVIGO RIALTO which I own. I still want to use and ride my AVIGO RIALTO even if I buy a second bike.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by IAmCosmo View Post
    Where do you live? Is it flat or are there hills? If it's flat you may be okay with most any of them. But some you listed only have 3 speeds, some only have 7. Not a wide range of gearing if you live where things aren't flat...

    I live in south central Massachusetts. There is a nice paved bike path in my area which I will be using when riding my bicycle. The bike path is straight, but it does have some small hills on it in different areas. As for the paved roads around here, they vary and are both flat and hilly, but the hills are not very steep hills. I would think that the 1st and 2nd gear on my current AVIGO RIALTO will be good enough for pedaling up hills around here. The other gears from 3rd gear to 7th gear can be used on the straight pavement.
    If I purchase another bicycle, I would probably want another 7 speed. I don't mind buying a 10, 18, 21, or a 24 speed bike as long as the 2nd bicycle that I purchase is a comfort bike and as comfortable enough like the current AVIGO RIALTO that I own. I also wouldn't mind buying a "hybrid" bicycle which looks and feels like a comfort bike that is also a mountain bike. The only 2 things which I don't like about some of the mountain bikes is that you have to lean forward while riding it and the feel of the seat. I don't like to lean forward while riding a bike. It feels uncomfortable. I like being in the upright position instead while pedaling.
    I've also noticed that most of the seats on mountain bikes feel very uncomfortable. They tend to dig into my rear end and inner crotch and thigh causing discomfort in these particular areas. I prefer the seat to be like the one that I have on my AVIGO RIALTO or like the ones that are on the older English style commuting/cruising and comfort bikes.
    Last edited by scottbrown; 02-15-10 at 06:00 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member tardman91's Avatar
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    I wouldn't be too concerned with your weight on a bike. I weigh 270 and rode my Schwinn hybrid bike with no problems, and I just bought a Raleigh sport. I haven't gotten a chance to ride the Raleigh yet, but it felt really solid around my neighborhood. Unless you're riding some kind of ultra light carbon fiber bike, I think most of them should handle at least 300+ pounds. As stated earlier, generally the more spokes your wheels have the more strength.

  9. #9
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    I noticed that a lot of bicycles come with alloy rims. How strong are alloy rims when you have a 263 LB person riding on the bicycle? Especially the thinner alloy wheels that are on the comfort cruiser bikes like the Schwinn Willy 7 speed or the Raleigh Detour Deluxe 24 Speed? Do alloy rims get warped very easily or break when a 263 LB Clydesdale like me rides a bike that has alloy rims? When I ride my bike I ride it easy. I don't do any mountain biking or ride like a maniac. I would basically do "gentle" riding and "cruising".
    Also, what other materials are bicycle rims made of which are stronger than alloy which can take the 263+ pounds of weight of a Clydesdale? I'm curious to find out how strong alloy rims are and how well they hold up with very heavy 263+ LB riders like me?

  10. #10
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    alloy rims are quite strong, its not alloy that is a concern for a 260 lb person, rather it is the number of spokes on the wheels. You should have at least 36 spokes per wheel. I have ranged from 225 -245 lbs and all my bikes have alloy rims. Steel rims are heavier and have a poor braking surface. Alloy rims are your best choice. Your weight should not crumple a well made wheel. I have had no problems with my wheels in 40 years of riding, but I all bikes that I can have built have 36 spoke wheels with a couple exceptions.

    As for the quality of your current bicycle, I could find very little information on the internet, only sold online at Toys R Us, there were no specs on the page. Without identifying the components of the bike, quality is very unknown.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bustercrb/sets/72157623483647522/

  11. #11
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    UPDATE:

    I've been doing more research and reading up a lot on the various bicycles that I like. Right now I've narrowed my search and selection down to 12 bicycles.
    They are:

    1. Schwinn Willy 7 Speed

    2. Pake Urban 6 Speed (www.pakebikes.com)

    3. 2009 Breezer Freedom Hybrid Comfort Bike 3 Speed

    4. Schwinn Johnny Coasting Bike, 3 Speed with internal hub

    5. 2009 Nova Transfer Bike, 7 Speed with internal rear hub

    6. 2009 Raleigh Detour Deluxe 24 Speed with disc brakes

    7. Giant Trasend DX 8 Speed or the Giant Trasend LX 8 Speed with the disc brakes

    8. Trek 7200, 8 Speed

    9. Trek Allant 7 Speed

    10. Trek Navigator 3.0, 8 Speed

    11. 2009 Specialized Globe Vienna 1

    12. 2010 Kona Smoke 8 Speed



    Out of the 12 bicycles that I've listed above, I've narrowed it down to 6 bikes that I like the most. The 6 which I like the best are:

    1. 2010 Schwinn Willy 7 Speed

    2. 2009 Raleigh Detour Deluxe 24 Speed

    3. Trek 7200, 8 Speed

    4. Trek Navigator 3.0, 8 Speed

    5. Trek Allant 7 Speed

    6. 2010 Kona Smoke 8 Speed


    Out of the 6 bikes that I like the most, I am leaning more towards the Raleigh, the Trek and the Kona bikes. As for styling, I like the older English style look more than I do the mountain bike look. But that doesn't mean that I am ruling out the mountain bike look. I like the mountain bike look too, but not as much as I do the English style look.
    I want to be able to choose a bicycle which I can ride for very long distances each time that I take it out for a ride (between 20 to 50 miles at a time). So this means that I need the bike to feel very comfortable while I am riding it each time that I go out on a 20 or 50+ mile ride with it. I will be riding the bike very frequently many times each week so feeling comfortable riding long distances is very important to me.

    I also want the bike to be able to easily attain a high rate of speed without much effort. I don't want the bike to "struggle" trying to get up there in speed whenever I need the speed whenever I am going uphill or while I am riding on level pavement or on a dirt road. Please keep in mind that I don't mind if the bike is a 7 speed or an 8 speed or a 24 speed bike. It does not matter to me how many number of gears and speeds that my bike has as long as it can attain a high rate of speed with very little effort and be able to maintain its speed on the regular roads while riding it. Please don't misunderstand me when I say that I want my bike to go fast. When I say this, I don't mean that I want to race with my bike. I just want the bike that I choose to be able to attain and maintain a decent rate of speed with very little effort while I am riding it. I don't want the bike to be sluggish or slow or hard to get up to speed. Hopefully, you know what I mean by this.
    Lastly, I want the bike that I choose to be very dependable, very durable and to endure riding it on paved roads, pathways and on dirt roads. I want the rims and the frame to be strong and sturdy enough to be able to withstand my current 263 LB weight when I ride it the 20 and 50+ mile distance very frequently many times each week. This will be a year round bicycle for me.

    So which of the bicycles in the list above do you think is the most compatible to my riding needs? Which 2 or 3 bicycles would you pick and recommend for me? Which 2 or 3 bicycles that I've listed above would you recommend to me for what my riding needs are? I am trying to narrow down my choice and selection even further and would like to get some input from the members in here. I would love to hear what your choices and recommendations are.

    THANK YOU
    Last edited by scottbrown; 02-16-10 at 03:27 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    I want to be able to choose a bicycle which I can ride for very long distances each time that I take it out for a ride (between 20 to 50 miles at a time). So this means that I need the bike to feel very comfortable...
    I also want the bike to be able to easily attain a high rate of speed without much effort. I don't want the bike to "struggle" trying to get up there in speed whenever I need the speed whenever I am going uphill or while I am riding on level pavement or on a dirt road. Please keep in mind that I don't mind if the bike is a 7 speed or an 8 speed or a 24 speed bike....
    I am not familiar with the specific bike models you mentioned, but all are made by reputable manufacturers and, if they fit properly, will be acceptable choices.

    What I would like to comment on are your requirements for the bike - Go uphill or on flat ground or on dirt - the 7 and 8 speed bikes are great bikes, but have a serious limitation in this respect... the bikes you short-listed (except for the schwinn, which I could not find any info on) are all actually 24 or 27 speed bikes. They have 7 or 8 gears in the back, and all have 3 gears in the front (think of a 4WD truck - 5 speed transmission with three ranges - 2WH, 4WH, 4WL). All the bikes probably have a similar range of gear ratios to get you up the hills and accelerated to speed.

    THe simple fact of the matter is that your choice of tires will have more affect on your ability to ride fast or uphill than the model or manufacturer of the bike. The human body is a very weak machine, and a few hundred grams shaved off the tires will go a long way toward easier riding... AND, for all the bikes you listed, the tires can be changed to suit your riding style, terrain, need for speed, etc. In general, narrower tires are lighter and faster, but wider tires can be run at lower pressure and are more comfortable. At 260 pouns, +/-, you actually can choose just about any width! I am around 260 lbs and my main bike for dirt road riding has 32mm wide tires and I have had no problems with durability. I also have a bike with 2.1" (~53mm) wide tires, and that bike is exclusively used for rough dirt roads and very rough trails.

    As for bike comfort and fit, this is all actually pretty easy to customize to your taste if you find a shop willing to work with you. Handlebars can be changed from straight to more 'laid back' (like the classic British, or "North Road" style), and saddles are super easy to swap. Ask at the shop if they can help you. Many will not charge too much for changing parts on a bike at the time of purchase, and this could also be a test of how helpful the shop is in general to help you choose a place where you are comfortable to buy.

    In my opinion, bike fit is the most important aspect of choosing a bike. A bike that fits properly makes your body a more efficient machine and is more fun to ride. If you really like the fit of your Avigo Rialto and think it would be a good fit for longer rides on a better bike, consider bringing it to the shop and asking if they can make the fit of the Trek or Kona (or whatever) more like the fit of the Avigo. THese are actually pretty easy things to do yourself if you buy a bike and want to change the fit sometime down the road.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
    What I would like to comment on are your requirements for the bike - Go uphill or on flat ground or on dirt - the 7 and 8 speed bikes are great bikes, but have a serious limitation in this respect... the bikes you short-listed (except for the schwinn, which I could not find any info on) are all actually 24 or 27 speed bikes. They have 7 or 8 gears in the back, and all have 3 gears in the front (think of a 4WD truck - 5 speed transmission with three ranges - 2WH, 4WH, 4WL). All the bikes probably have a similar range of gear ratios to get you up the hills and accelerated to speed.

    I am a little bit confused with what you are saying. When I looked up each of the 6 bicycles that I listed above, the information on them said that they are either 6 speed, 8 speed or 24 speed. The ONLY 24 speed on my list is the Raleigh Detour Deluxe. Are all the other bicycles that I listed above also 24 and 27 speed bicycles too? Please clarify this for me.

  14. #14
    Senior Member EKW in DC's Avatar
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    I haven't checked all of them, but I just looked at the Trek Navigator.

    Up front (by the pedals), it's got three chainwheels: 48, 38, 28 (The numbers meaning the number of teeth on the gears)

    The rear cassette (group of gear cogs) has eight speeds/gears, ranging from 11 to 32 teeth.

    To determine the number of speeds a bike has, you multiply the number of chainwheels by the number of gear cogs on the cassette or freewheel (on the rear wheel) to get the number of possible combinations of front and rear gears. In the case of the Navigator, that's 24, so no, it's not an 8-speed bike, but rather a 24. I imagine all of them on your list are either 21 or 24. New bikes sold today with shifting usually have 2 or 3 chainrings up front (3 most common on hybrids and mountain bikes) and 7 or more speeds on the rear.
    Last edited by EKW in DC; 02-16-10 at 01:48 PM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member EKW in DC's Avatar
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    If I might also add - I wouldn't be in a big hurry to jump to a new bike yet. If the Avigo you have is holding up OK, I'd just stick with it for a while. When I got the bike I have now, I was positive I wanted a hybrid. It's been a good bike and gotten me riding and in much better shape. I commute 14 miles round trip daily now and ride more on weekends when I can and the weather is nice. I'm trimming up and losing weight.

    All that said, I've come to realize over time that I really want a touring style road bike with drop handlebars, etc. If I had rushed out to buy a better version of the department store hybrid I have right now, I would have bought another hybrid. Now, in better shape and with more cycling experience under my belt, my cycling horizons and knowledge have expanded. I'm considering doing some bike touring and riding longer distances. I know what I really want to get is something completely different. My next bike purchase will be a touring bike either new from a bike shop or used off of Craigslist if I find something that fits the bill when the time comes.

    Comfort bikes are not the only comfortable bikes, either. Lots of folks around these forums will tell you that when properly set up a good road/touring bike is as comfortable, if not more comfortable, for longer rides than any "comfort" bike.

    Long story short, I agree with those that are suggesting you keep what you've got for a while. i.e., I recommend your current bike. Your ideal bike selection may change given some time. Ride what you got until you're sure of what you want next. And if you've got $$$ burning a hole in your pocket, buy some accessories, tools, racks, lights, etc., that will make your current bike more functional for you.

    Just my $0.02.

  16. #16
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    Almost any any bike except those with 8 or so spokes is OK. If it has over 30 spokes, you'll be fine.

    Lower end bikes tend to be less delicate, so stay out of the upper tier.

    I weigh 265 and ride a Specialized Secteur, a Globe Vienna 1 Deluxe and a 1981 Raleigh 10 speed. Not all at the same time.
    Last edited by gitarzan; 02-16-10 at 04:14 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jseis View Post
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  17. #17
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    Ride what you've got until it falls apart. I just looked it up and if it is the one listed on the Toys R Us website, It is anyone's guess how long it will hold up. The Raliegh Detour Delux looks like it will be a nice upgrade when the time comes, but if you are planning on doing a lot of 50 mile rides you will probably want a comfort road or touring bike with drop bars. You may not know it yet, but those type of bikes are prefered on longer rides for good reasons. Your ideal bike today is not what your ideal bike will be 6 months or a year from now, we've all been there. Ride lots and see how it goes.
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
    May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey

  18. #18
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    Get the best you can afford that fits.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  19. #19
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    Why the new bike? You went from 263 to 236 while typing a couple paragraphs. Whatever you are doing is working just fine!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    Why the new bike? You went from 263 to 236 while typing a couple paragraphs. Whatever you are doing is working just fine!


    I actually weigh 263 LBS. I must have made an error in the numbers if I said that I weigh 236 LBS. My "REAL" weight is 263 LBS. Sorry for the mix-up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EKW in DC View Post
    I haven't checked all of them, but I just looked at the Trek Navigator.

    Up front (by the pedals), it's got three chainwheels: 48, 38, 28 (The numbers meaning the number of teeth on the gears)

    The rear cassette (group of gear cogs) has eight speeds/gears, ranging from 11 to 32 teeth.

    To determine the number of speeds a bike has, you multiply the number of chainwheels by the number of gear cogs on the cassette or freewheel (on the rear wheel) to get the number of possible combinations of front and rear gears. In the case of the Navigator, that's 24, so no, it's not an 8-speed bike, but rather a 24. I imagine all of them on your list are either 21 or 24. New bikes sold today with shifting usually have 2 or 3 chainrings up front (3 most common on hybrids and mountain bikes) and 7 or more speeds on the rear.

    I went on the TREK website and looked at the Trek Navigator 3.0. The drivetrain information that it gives on this bicycle is as follows:

    Shifters: Shimano EF60 - 8 speed, Front Derailleur: Shimano M191,
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano Alivio, Crank: Shimano M191 48/38/28 w/chainguard, Cassette: SRAM PG830 11-32, 8 speed, Pedals: Dual density platform



    Under "Shifters" and "Cassette" section it states that this bike has "8 Speeds". Am I reading it wrong? I see the 8 speed listed and I am assuming that the bike is an 8 speed bike. I am doing the same thing with all the other bicycles that are on my list which I like. When I go into their respective website I see written that they are either a 7 speed or an 8 speed or a 24 speed when I look under the drive train information section. Maybe I am reading it wrong? If I am reading it wrong then why does it mention that the bike has 8 speeds? I am kind of confused about this and how to read and interpret the speeds on each othe the bicycles which I have in my list that I like.
    Last edited by scottbrown; 02-16-10 at 11:04 PM.

  22. #22
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottbrown View Post
    I actually weigh 263 LBS. I must have made an error in the numbers if I said that I weigh 236 LBS. My "REAL" weight is 263 LBS. Sorry for the mix-up.
    No problem, no reason to be sorry, just something to mess with. Second mention of weight typed 236, just be happy you didn't post anything to catch the attention of the grammar police!

  23. #23
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    I've narrowed down my bicycle choices even further. I want to purchase either a Trek, a Motobecane or the Kona Smoke.
    I like the Trek 7100 and the Trek Navigator 3.0. The Trek 7100 and the Navigator 3.0 both have 36 spoke wheels.

    From the Motobecane line I like the Motobecane Jubilee, the Jubilee Deluxe and the Elite FS. All 3 of the Motobecanes have the front suspension fork and 36 spoke wheels.

    As for the Kona Smoke, I am not 100% sure, but I think that it also has 36 spoke wheels too. The Kona Smoke does not have the front fork suspension. But it does have the fatter tires and front and rear fenders. It also has the classic styling to it.

    I want to narrow my choice down even further now and to pick out the 2 "BEST" bicycles out of the whole bunch. I would like the bicycle to have durability, comfort, speed, long distance capabilities, the ability to ride it on dirt and gravel roads as well as on paved streets and bike paths. Which 2 bicycles do you think that would be the best choice?
    To narrow my choices down even further, which one of the Trek bicycles out of the 3 in my list do you think would be the best choice?
    Also, which of the 3 Motobecane bicycles out of the 3 in my list would be the best choice?
    And finally, how would the Kona Smoke compare itself or differ from the Trek 7100 and Trek Navigator 3.0 and from the Motobecane bikes? In other words, what are the similarities and differences of the Kona Smoke when compared to the Trek 7100 and the Trek Navigator 3.0 and the Motobecane Jubilee, Jubilee Deluxe and the Motobecane Elite FS?
    What do you think are the differences and similarities between each bike from one another? Or do you think that there are very few to no differences between the Trek 7100 & Navigator 3.0 and the Motobecane Jubilee, Jubilee Deluxe and Elite FS and the Kona Smoke? I would like to hear what your views and opinions are regarding the similarities and the differences between each of these bicycles while comparing each bike to my needs that I've listed here.

    THANK YOU

  24. #24
    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
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    The Kona Smoke is the best bike of the last list as long as it fits you. Stay away from suspension forks unless you are Mountain Biking. Most of the time, they just waste energy that could be moving you forward.
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
    May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by c_m_shooter View Post
    The Kona Smoke is the best bike of the last list as long as it fits you. Stay away from suspension forks unless you are Mountain Biking. Most of the time, they just waste energy that could be moving you forward.

    I never knew that suspension forks can hinder and reduce the speed of a bicycle. That's very interesting. I always thought that suspension forks on mountain bikes and on commuting, comfort and touring bikes were there only to make the ride softer and more comfortable. I never knew that they could slow the bike down and prevent it from going faster.
    Tell me, how do suspension forks on a bicycle waste energy and slow the rider down? How is this so? I would like to know more about this and to also find out what additional cons and negatives there are to having a suspension fork on a bike.

    The other question that I have is will the Kona Smoke be an excellent bike to go long distances? I would like to be able to bike ride 50+ miles at any given time without feeling uncomfortable while riding and pedaling. I would want the bike to feel comfortable and I would also want it to be ergonomic if I am going to go long distances on it. Is the Kona Smoke a good bike for this type of long distance riding? Or will the Trek 7100 and Trek Navigator 3.0 and the Motobecane bikes in my list be a better choice over the Kona Smoke for comfort, speed and long distance riding? What do you think?

    Also, I would want the bike to be heavy duty enough to be able to be used on dirt roads and on unpaved roads as well as on bike paths and on regular paved streets. I also want to be able to easily gain speed on the bike while doing long distance riding or cruising. I don't want the bike to be sluggish or slow. I am not looking to race, but at the same time, I do not want a slow bike either. I want to get decent speed out of the bike too. Will the Kona Smoke do all these things which I am looking for or is the Trek 7100 and the Trek Navigator 3.0 and the Motobecane bikes that are in my list a better choice for all these tasks? What do you think?
    Last edited by scottbrown; 02-17-10 at 02:09 AM.

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