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  1. #1
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    Trying to avoid byers remorse.....

    OK, so I am in the process of buying my first road bike since I can feel myself pushing the hybrid to it's limits and the trails are not ride-able enough to consistently be on the mountain bike.

    I have found a lbs that is providing me great service and support and is encouraging me to ride so I have decided to try and purchase through them and provide them some support (assuming of course that I can find a road bike that I like). Due to my travel schedule for work and the weather around Philly lately I have not had much luck in being able to take anything out for a test ride to see how it feels so I have been stuck doing research.

    One of the bikes I am considering is the Cannondale Six Carbon 5 and this is where my question comes in. The lbs has a 2009 in stock that I can get a pretty good deal on. Based upon some changes between the 2009 and 2010 model years I have been wondering a few things. Would I really notice the difference of almost a full pound in the weight of the bike between a 2009 and a 2010? Also, do I really need to be concerned about this BB30 crank technology that I have been reading about? Seeing as this is my first road bike, am I really looking into this too much?

    I ultimately plan on taking out this, and a number of other bikes from different shops out on test rides but sitting in a hotel room traveling for business gives me a lot of time to over-analyze things. I am just curious to other opinions and experiences since it may be a couple of weeks before I can find out for myself and the anticipation is killing me.

    This is going to be a large investment for me and I would like to do it right the first time. I have tried for months to find a used road bike but I just have not been able to find anything that fits and all I want to do is ride.

    I researched this topic in the road bikes forum but the discussions were mainly focused around racing. I am more into the fitness and weight loss aspect at this point in my life and figure I can always get into racing later after I lose the weight.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    As a Clyde, sometimes lighter aint always better!

    Go for best fit and remember, blue bikes are faster!

  3. #3
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    The thing to remember is they are always coming out with new product same as anything else. 2009 was the first year for the Carbon6 and are very nice bikes, the 2010 is definatly lighter but that dosen't mean better. I test rode a Carbon6 1 and it was a great ride just not my fit. Don't stick with just one brand look around. If you get the 2010 just remember the 2011 will be advertised as better so don't even think of that.
    Best thing about cycling is when I'm at work I'm thinking of cycling, when I'm cycling I'm thinking about cycling.

  4. #4
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    You will most likely never notice the pound of difference between bikes.
    Don't sweat it about BB30. Right now, all that means is replacement parts are less common and more expensive.

    Beanz is right: Get whatever fits the best. That's going to be the biggest payoff in the long haul.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    You will most likely never notice the pound of difference between bikes.
    Don't sweat it about BB30. Right now, all that means is replacement parts are less common and more expensive.

    Beanz is right: Get whatever fits the best. That's going to be the biggest payoff in the long haul.
    Good advice here, and I would add that I always recommend buying the first bike at a LBS where you feel comfortable. They'll help you with the fit, minor adjustments and maintenance.

  6. #6
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    Anyone posting in this section of the message board should not be concerned with the weight of their bike.

    BB30 may not be as common as standard designs, but you can find them no problem. However, I doubt you will need to replace it any time soon.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by IAmCosmo View Post
    Anyone posting in this section of the message board should not be concerned with the weight of their bike.
    Kind of what I was thinking. It won't/shouldn't be long before you lose that pound riding.

  8. #8
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IAmCosmo View Post
    Anyone posting in this section of the message board should not be concerned with the weight of their bike.
    Not true. There's plenty of reason to be concerned over bike/part weights, sometimes even for us big guys. Now, on my grocery bike what you're saying is true: I've chosen heavy, puncture resistant tires, it has racks and hard-side panniers, and a big front basket. It's a tank. That's why I only ride it to the grocery, or on other short errands (or the occasional cruise on the MUP.)
    My brevet bike is kept to a minimum necessary weight. I don't need the extra pounds to lug around on a 400km timed event by putting a sluggish pair of heavy, flat-proof tires or the weight of a full set of racks and panniers. My singlespeed is kept lean because I only have 1 gear, whether it's for flats or hills. I don't need any excess weight on the bike to drag up a hill.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    Not true. There's plenty of reason to be concerned over bike/part weights, sometimes even for us big guys. Now, on my grocery bike what you're saying is true: I've chosen heavy, puncture resistant tires, it has racks and hard-side panniers, and a big front basket. It's a tank. That's why I only ride it to the grocery, or on other short errands (or the occasional cruise on the MUP.)
    My brevet bike is kept to a minimum necessary weight. I don't need the extra pounds to lug around on a 400km timed event by putting a sluggish pair of heavy, flat-proof tires or the weight of a full set of racks and panniers. My singlespeed is kept lean because I only have 1 gear, whether it's for flats or hills. I don't need any excess weight on the bike to drag up a hill.
    So you're telling me that if you took a 20 pound bike and changed a few parts and shaved a half pound off it, you could tell the difference?

    I'm not saying riding a 40 pound department store bike is the same as riding a high end carbon bike. But, the majority of us can't tell the difference in a few grams here and there.

  10. #10
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IAmCosmo View Post
    So you're telling me that if you took a 20 pound bike and changed a few parts and shaved a half pound off it, you could tell the difference?

    I'm not saying riding a 40 pound department store bike is the same as riding a high end carbon bike. But, the majority of us can't tell the difference in a few grams here and there.
    Look back at what I wrote earlier: I said that he's not likely to notice a difference of 1 pound between bikes.
    You made the blanket statement that none of us here need to worry about bike weight, to which I pointed out some specific situations in which a pound or two will make a difference.
    I never said "be a total weight weenie and shell out the extra money because 1 pound is a massive difference." However... it would depend on where the weight was saved as to whether or not there's an immediate performance difference. Switching from a 2000g wheelset to a 1550g wheelset on an already ultralight bike will decrease rotational mass and improve acceleration and climbing. Shaving 100g each distributed among the frame, fork, handlebar/stem, saddle/post and cranks/pedals would be far less noticeable.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
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  11. #11
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    All,

    Thank you very much for your responses. Rest assured that I will be purchasing the bike that feels and fits the best. I was ultimately asking the weight question to try and determine if there was anything that I should try to key in on to help in my decision making process when I start test riding different bikes. From what I have determined so far for the Cannondale the weight is being saved mainly from changes in the fork. I am not sure if this would have any impact on steering feel or control. I have tried many searches in the forums but most of the responses are centered around racing which I will not be doing.

    I do think that a single pound should not be the final deciding factor in my bike purchase, which it will not, but from my research so far I have gathered that it is possible for weight to have some sort of impact on the characteristics of the bike. Not having ever ridden a road bike before I am just trying to educate myself so that I can make the best informed decision that I can, I just don't think I can compare it to a mountain bike or my hybrid. Are there certain handling characteristics that I should look out for that could point to problems? I do not know so I figured I would ask some questions.

    I have many more questions that I will probably ask on the forums, the lbs and to other riders over time. Some I may be able to answer myself with research and experience. I would just rather not make an expensive mistake and I do not think that I am capable of doing a 15 mile test ride yet as a number of riders like to suggest in the road forum. I have to start somewhere.

  12. #12
    Senior Member clydeosaur's Avatar
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    MrDavros2U,

    I just went through the same situation. I ended up bying the '09 leftover Cannondale Six5. I didn't see enough of a difference to justify the cost difference. Both had same components/options. I've been happy with my decision & saved $600. My suggestion - go ride them, them decide.

  13. #13
    Senior Member socalrider's Avatar
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    How much of a price difference is there? Sometimes there is a more wiggle room with an older model as opposed to new product that will be in higher demand..

  14. #14
    Senior Member Pinyon's Avatar
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    Another vote for getting what feels good. Ride a number of bikes, and ride them the way your other bike does not measure up (hills, HARD, whatever). Get the one that feels the best.
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  15. #15
    Come here often? <wink> exile's Avatar
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    Like others have mentioned ride as many as you can. Since you are not racing don't limit yourself to racing oriented bikes. Check out Cyclocross, touring, fitness, etc. Also give yourself enough time to look around. Basically decide what your current bike(s) aren't doing that you feel a newer bike will accomplish.

    If you are in the Philly area check out Trophy Bikes. Although I live about 3 to4 hours away I purchased my LHT their and both the owner and sales guy were very patient and helpful.

    The perfect bike is all relative to the person riding it. A popular saying on the Commuting Forum is (as CliftonGK1 can attest to): "The number of bikes one should have is (n+1)." Welcome to the conundrum.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    Look back at what I wrote earlier: I said that he's not likely to notice a difference of 1 pound between bikes.
    You made the blanket statement that none of us here need to worry about bike weight, to which I pointed out some specific situations in which a pound or two will make a difference.
    I never said "be a total weight weenie and shell out the extra money because 1 pound is a massive difference." However... it would depend on where the weight was saved as to whether or not there's an immediate performance difference. Switching from a 2000g wheelset to a 1550g wheelset on an already ultralight bike will decrease rotational mass and improve acceleration and climbing. Shaving 100g each distributed among the frame, fork, handlebar/stem, saddle/post and cranks/pedals would be far less noticeable.
    I personally can't see a pound or two making a difference. Ten pounds? Yeah. But a couple? No. If you are a 120 pound pure climber, then yes, worry about what your bike weighs. But I still believe anyone in this forum would notice losing 5 pounds off their body before they would notice losing a pound off their bike.

    I have two bikes that are pretty much the same bike (same geometry, same saddle, bars, pedals, etc.). One is carbon, one is aluminum. The carbon bike weighs almost two pounds less than the aluminum bike. Both bikes get ridden over 1500 miles a year. I can't tell enough of a difference between the two to talk about.

    However, I recently lost another 10 pounds and that made a huge difference.

  17. #17
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IAmCosmo View Post
    I have two bikes that are pretty much the same bike (same geometry, same saddle, bars, pedals, etc.). One is carbon, one is aluminum. The carbon bike weighs almost two pounds less than the aluminum bike. Both bikes get ridden over 1500 miles a year. I can't tell enough of a difference between the two to talk about.
    Most of that 2 pound difference is going to be in the frame/fork, if I had to take an educated guess. Again, look at what I wrote: If the weight is distributed over the frame/fork, etc... it's not as noticeable a difference. If you ride a pair of Mavic Aksium wheels (1950g/set) on a regular basis and swap out for a pair of DT Swiss Mon Chasserale wheels (1450g/set) you're dropping a clean pound just on the wheels, which is a noticeable difference in the feel when accelerating from a stop and when climbing.
    I'm agreeing with you that 1 or 2 pounds won't make a difference, with the exception of a very specific situation.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
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  18. #18
    Tilting with windmills txvintage's Avatar
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    I wouldn't sweat the BB30 thing at all. Worst case scenario is you get the adapter for a normal BB, but Cannondale has a history of supporting their model lines very well.

  19. #19
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    Ride both bikes (and maybe some others). Then you will know why you chose your bike, and you will have no remorse.

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