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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 04-16-10, 04:04 PM   #1
Redeemed07
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Is this bike clydetastic enough for me?

Kona Fire Mountain, I'm guessing it's a few years old. Quite ugly but..it's a Kona for what seems like a great price. My Specialized Hardrock Classic (late 90's) just isn't cutting it for me. I'm over 350lbs.

http://orlando.craigslist.org/bik/1686783632.html



Any thoughts would be appreciated.
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Old 04-16-10, 04:25 PM   #2
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What's the problem with the Hard Rock?
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Old 04-16-10, 04:34 PM   #3
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When I'm going uphill or really cranking it pops loud like something broke or the chain is jumping over teeth or something. I don't know what the sound is but it's horrible and getting worse. Also my hands go numb waaay too fast. My seat is pretty high up so that my legs can extend which causes me to put a lot of weight on my hands. So the handlebar was raised which helped but I think a bigger frame would help more. I've never been sized I just bought it and hoped for the best. Now that I know I love riding and want to do more, I need a bike better suited for me but I can't afford new.
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Old 04-16-10, 05:17 PM   #4
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That is definately a great reason to buy. Make sure the Kona fits you (I'd assume it is suited for someone around 6'). The only negative might be the forks. If they don't have a lockout, you will probably be bottoming out the forks a lot. Other than that, check it out well and go for it.
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Old 04-16-10, 05:39 PM   #5
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Replace the chain and cassette. Have all 3 chain wheels inspected for wear.
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Old 04-16-10, 05:40 PM   #6
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The only thing I would be concerned about is the Acera groupo on the bike. It's not a real heavy duty component groupo and may not be able to withstand the torque that you can apply to it. Outside of that, the fork is a solid fork and the frame should be bomb proof.
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Old 04-16-10, 06:00 PM   #7
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The only thing I would be concerned about is the Acera groupo on the bike. It's not a real heavy duty component groupo and may not be able to withstand the torque that you can apply to it.
My current bike has the Acera. I wonder if that's the cause of my current popping problem? What's the cheapest, heavy duty replacement you'd recommend?
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Old 04-16-10, 06:08 PM   #8
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Google Shimano 105 rear dérailleur. Can be found cheap. It's a good middle line.
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Old 04-16-10, 06:38 PM   #9
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Google Shimano 105 rear dérailleur. Can be found cheap. It's a good middle line.
Great! I could do that price. Thanks!
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Old 04-16-10, 06:54 PM   #10
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Since it is a mountain bike, you could upgrade the rear derailleur with a Deore, Deore LX or XT model.
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Old 04-16-10, 07:08 PM   #11
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Since it is a mountain bike, you could upgrade the rear derailleur with a Deore, Deore LX or XT model.
Like this one? If so, that's also doable. Which would be better this one or the Shimano 105?

Last edited by Redeemed07; 04-16-10 at 07:09 PM. Reason: I messed up the hyperlink
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Old 04-16-10, 08:43 PM   #12
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What size is your hardrock? Is it way undersized? If not why not replace the chain and cassette, then either use a stem raiser or replacement stem. Them maybe add some bar ends for extra hand positions.

I'm not trying to stop you from buying a differant bike, but that might be a cheaper way to go. BTW I'm in your weight range and ride a new Hardrock as my mountain bike. At our weight you are going to be replacing chains and cassettes, just kind of a way of life.
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Old 04-16-10, 09:00 PM   #13
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What size is your hardrock? Is it way undersized? If not why not replace the chain and cassette, then either use a stem raiser or replacement stem. Them maybe add some bar ends for extra hand positions.

I'm not trying to stop you from buying a differant bike, but that might be a cheaper way to go. BTW I'm in your weight range and ride a new Hardrock as my mountain bike. At our weight you are going to be replacing chains and cassettes, just kind of a way of life.
It's a 19" and I'd say not "way" undersized but enough to annoy me. It's about 10 years old and the grip shifters (I hate gs's) are going to be dead soon. I bought Onza barends but until I replace the gs's with triggers I don't have room for them. It just got a new chain and once I get done upgrading the things that will need upgrading I'll have spent enough to purchase a newer one anyway so I figured I might as well buy a newer one that's more suited for me. I'd like to get to the point where I can ride long distance, but still like being able to take a rough path if I want, or drop off a curb so a road bike won't do.

I love my bike but I need one that's more fit for me so my hands can handle riding as long as my body can.
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Old 04-16-10, 10:35 PM   #14
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Like this one? If so, that's also doable. Which would be better this one or the Shimano 105?
Yep, that one will work just fine for you. The 105 is for a road bike. Listen, you're a big guy, so am I, and that Acera groupo just ain't made for adults who actually use their bikes let alone big guys like us. The Shimano Deore lineup is really the lowest I would go on any mountain bike ridden by an adult.
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Old 04-17-10, 07:11 AM   #15
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For a clyde and especially if you a little longer in the waist the hands will go numb quick on a smaller frame bike. When I began looking I was all for a hardrock but even the larger frame didn't fit me well. I ended up with a Specialized Globe Carmel 3. This bike is more of a comfort bike so I wasn't leaning forward so much. I have played with heights of the handle bar and found that the more upright I sat (handle bar high) my hands had less problems. Like everyone says make sure it fits you.
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Old 04-17-10, 07:49 PM   #16
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Yep, that one will work just fine for you. The 105 is for a road bike. Listen, you're a big guy, so am I, and that Acera groupo just ain't made for adults who actually use their bikes let alone big guys like us. The Shimano Deore lineup is really the lowest I would go on any mountain bike ridden by an adult.
I'm finding that out on my bike (though age and possible lack of care may be playing a factor). What's a solid, heavy-duty, long-lasting groupo you'd recommend for under $100 if not the Deore?

I appreciate all the input, especially from my fellow clydes.
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Old 04-17-10, 07:54 PM   #17
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i see your in Central Fla. Everyone from florida talks about how there are no hills anywhere in florida. Will all your riding be on dirt trails? if not, why not look for a used road bike?
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Old 04-17-10, 08:59 PM   #18
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I don't know about a road bike for you, Redeemed. If $200 - $300 is what you have to spend, I think a used mountain bike is the way to go. $300 is about what you'll spend to get a decent rear road wheel for a guy as big as us, and a $200 - $300 used road bike is likely to require a new rear wheel, but stock wheels on a mountain bike are likely to be OK. I suggest you go look at that Kona. I bet you know enough by now to get a pretty good feel for whether it will work for you. Get on it, jump off a curb, sprint up the street as hard as you can. If it doesn't make funny noises and it seems to fit, buy it, knowing that you'll be upgrading parts from time to time as the budget allows. Good luck, and happy riding!
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Old 04-18-10, 12:00 PM   #19
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I'm finding that out on my bike (though age and possible lack of care may be playing a factor). What's a solid, heavy-duty, long-lasting groupo you'd recommend for under $100 if not the Deore?

I appreciate all the input, especially from my fellow clydes.
The Deore is a great groupo. I meant to omply in my earlier post that I wouldn't go below the Deore level. There are several categories within the Deore lineup and they should all work just fine - even the lowest level of Deore. The thing that's great about the Deore lineup is that they all work great and are very durable. The only real difference is that they weigh less the higher up in the lineup you move.
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Old 04-20-10, 07:05 PM   #20
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A road bike isn't an option. I'm set on a mountain bike. I don't even think a cyclocross would be an option. I ride mostly paved trails but want to take the dirt path, curbs etc...

Thanks to everyone for the replies! I appreciate the input.
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Old 04-21-10, 06:21 AM   #21
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Why are you considering replacing parts before they break? That Acera gruppo, assuming it has been maintained, should be perfectly functional for quite awhile. By time those parts wear out you might decide that you don't want a mountain bike at all, I'd save the upgrade money and put it towards some gear. New cycling shorts, jersey, helmet, flat repair kit, frame pump etc. Without the later two, don't ride any further than you'd like to walk.
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Old 04-21-10, 07:05 AM   #22
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Why are you considering replacing parts before they break? That Acera gruppo, assuming it has been maintained, should be perfectly functional for quite awhile. By time those parts wear out you might decide that you don't want a mountain bike at all, I'd save the upgrade money and put it towards some gear. New cycling shorts, jersey, helmet, flat repair kit, frame pump etc. Without the later two, don't ride any further than you'd like to walk.
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Old 04-21-10, 08:46 PM   #23
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Why are you considering replacing parts before they break? That Acera gruppo, assuming it has been maintained, should be perfectly functional for quite awhile. By time those parts wear out you might decide that you don't want a mountain bike at all, I'd save the upgrade money and put it towards some gear. New cycling shorts, jersey, helmet, flat repair kit, frame pump etc. Without the later two, don't ride any further than you'd like to walk.
I'm not considering replacing parts, I'm considering buying a bike better suited for me. This bike was really just to see if I would enjoy it and stick with it. The grip-shifters are broken but functioning somewhat and will need to be replaced *if* I don't buy a new bike. The discussion of groupo began with a comment on the bike I posted as an option. Rosborn mentioned the Acera groupo on the Kona could be a weak spot. If/when it bit the dust I'd like to know what it should be replaced with. I'm not going to fix what ain't broke (bad grammar hurt me but to say that any other way is just wrong!).
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Old 04-21-10, 09:35 PM   #24
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I'm not considering replacing parts, I'm considering buying a bike better suited for me. This bike was really just to see if I would enjoy it and stick with it. The grip-shifters are broken but functioning somewhat and will need to be replaced *if* I don't buy a new bike. The discussion of groupo began with a comment on the bike I posted as an option. Rosborn mentioned the Acera groupo on the Kona could be a weak spot. If/when it bit the dust I'd like to know what it should be replaced with. I'm not going to fix what ain't broke (bad grammar hurt me but to say that any other way is just wrong!).
Exactly. My 18 year old son 6' 3" and 205 pounds, blew out two Acera drivetrains. We finally had the last one replaced with a Deore drivetrain and haven't had a problem since. I can guarentee that he didn't put as much torque on the drivetrain as you will be. My mountain bike has a Deore drive train. I rode with him and witnessed how he rode his bike. Acera components are garbage components for adults. They may work fine for teenage kids but they just aren't durable enough for stronger riders - hence the fact that Acera are put on low end mountain bikes that are geared for the entry level rider. The fact that Shimano doesn't even have this groupo on their website should speak volumes.
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