Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 53
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northern BC
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Bike advice- not straightforward- please don't gloss over!!

    Hi all,

    I'm looking to buy a new bike and I need some help with it. I have been riding a dual suspension Trek as my main mode of transportation for 10 years (when it isn't snowing) and it is pretty much at the end of its life. Looking at how much it would cost to replace all the worn parts is approaching the cost of a new bike. When I bought the bike, I was communing/riding on variable XC trails and worked really well. However, several years back I moved cities and the terrain changed and the Trek didnít work so well anymore.

    Hereís the environment Iím in:
    -I live in a city with really bad roads everywhere (Northern Canada)
    -There is very little flat ground and lots of hills in this area, so you seem to be always climbing

    Hereís me:
    -Clyde (240 lbs plus the weight of the inevitable backpack)
    -Unusually strong legs- I hate that feeling that you are always going to break something taking off from a stop light or when you really want to put the hammer down and are just going to rip all the teeth off your cogs. Donít laugh- itís happened to me twice.

    Things I want in the bike:
    -Comfortable for short AND long hauls on crap roads, uphill with cargo
    -I always seem to have cargo with me so bomber racks or rack mounts are a must
    -I would like the flexibly to do trail rides (fit wider knobbly tires)
    -If I feel brave, the ability to run studded tires in the winter
    -Lightweight, but being a Clyde, I donít how light I can get
    -Durable to get many years out of it
    -Easy maintenance preferably on a worldwide scale
    -Easy adjustability- like not having the front derailleur directly under a swing arm pivot which makes the HI LO screws next to impossible to tune
    -Brakes that will stop the bike, me, and my cargo in the wet flying down a hill when some huge truck in inevitably pulls in front of me

    I think I am after a touring or cyclocross bike that has a steel frame, carbon fibre or chromoly fork, with rack mounts or racks, fenders or fender mounts, a traditional Shimano drive train, triple front ring, 9 speed rear cassette, cyclocross wheelset (700c or 29Ē???), disc or vee brakes and maybe a suspended seatpost to top it all off.

    Look forward to your suggestions!!

    Thanks for your time!!

    EB

  2. #2
    Bikesman RedWhiteandRed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern Clime
    My Bikes
    Giant Seek 1 IGH; Specialized Roubaix On Order
    Posts
    364
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Giant Seek 0.

  3. #3
    Senior Member atcfoody's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    In school again.
    My Bikes
    Trek 7200fx, Surly LHT
    Posts
    262
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Honestly, I would say a Surley LHT would be perfect for you, and that is not because I ride one, but it helps. If you ride a size 54 or smaller, it comes with 26 inch wheels, like your mountain bike. If you ride a larger size, it comes with 700c wheels, and you can put 700c by 45 tires on it, or 40's with fenders. So the big tire thing is covered. Front and rear rack mounts, long wheel base and a steel frame to soak up bumps. Solid 9-speed rear and triple front chain rings for climbing and durability. Drop handle bars give you the speed option, but plenty of hand positions for just riding around. Also, it has bomb proof components. From someone who has broken a bottom bracket and twisted up a chain like Christmas tree garland, I can relate to the "unusually strong legs" remarks. I got accused of having calf implants this past Sunday.

    Just my thoughts. A lot depends on your budget. Good luck, and let us know what you decide.

    D
    Help me and team North UMC at the 2010 Pedal for Peace.

    Everything looks better on a full stomach.

    Doing the right thing and rocking the boat are often one in the same.

    Well, technically speaking, one needs 3 things to qualify for recumbent ownership: a beard, an aerobelly, and a technical degree or background.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cyril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwestern, Ontario
    Posts
    595
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    LHT

    Buy the frame and have your LBS build it to suit.
    Thats what I did.
    (Winston Endall at Cycle Cambridge......Cambridge, ontario.... did the build)

    Cyril

  5. #5
    Senior Member Cyril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwestern, Ontario
    Posts
    595
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    LHT

    Buy the frame and have your LBS build it to suit.
    Thats what I did.
    (Winston Endall at Cycle Cambridge......Cambridge, ontario.... did the build)

    Cyril

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northern BC
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks so much!!

    I should also mention that I am 6'0" with shorter legs and a long torso...if that actually changes anything

    EB

  7. #7
    Senior Member socalrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Upland, CA
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Liege, Motorola Team Issue Eddy Mercxk, Surly Crosscheck Cyclocross bike, Fisher Supercaliber Mtn. Bike
    Posts
    5,002
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 on LHT or Surly Cross Check, both solid rides and can be built with many different wheel options and components to suit your needs..

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,088
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwood Blues View Post
    I think I am after a touring or cyclocross bike that has a steel frame, carbon fibre or chromoly fork, with rack mounts or racks, fenders or fender mounts, a traditional Shimano drive train, triple front ring, 9 speed rear cassette, cyclocross wheelset (700c or 29Ē???), disc or vee brakes and maybe a suspended seatpost to top it all off.
    I was thinking touring or cyclocross bike as I read your post, so I think you're on the right track. You might also look into off-road touring bikes (e.g. Salsa Fargo and similar). If you want consistent wet weather stopping power, look for a bike with disc brakes. Also, don't rule out aluminum frames. I absolutely hate aluminum frames when they're married to standard (e.g. 700x25) road tires. My aluminum touring bike is quite nice though, thanks to the fact that it uses 700x35 tires.

    Not knowing anything about your budget, it's difficult to recommend specific bikes. Still, if I were you, I'd consider the following bikes/frames:

    Surly Long Haul Trucker
    Soma Saga
    Trek 520
    Soma Double Cross DC
    Gunnar Fast Lane
    Bikes Direct Fantom Cross Outlaw
    Salsa Vaya
    Salsa Fargo

    The first three are the standard, boring rim-brake touring bikes that everyone is going to suggest. All of the fun bikes are at the end of the list

    You could also consider doing what I did: mate a disc-capable cyclocross fork to a touring frame. You're still stuck with a rim brake at the rear, but a mechanical disc (e.g. Avid BB7) up front will give you consistent stopping power in wet conditions. The CX fork will quicken the steering a bit, but it isn't too bad.

  9. #9
    Senior Member neilfein's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Highland Park, NJ, USA
    My Bikes
    "Hildy", a Novara Randonee touring bike; a 16-speed Bike Friday Tikit; Dahon Curve D3 folding bike; a green around-town cruiser; and a Specialized Stumpjumper frame-based built-up MTB.
    Posts
    3,778
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm a big fan of steel touring bikes, but I would consider a hardtail mountain bike with a flat bar. You get more control with a wide bar than you do with drop bars, which is mostly what you'd get on a touring bike. Steel or aluminum would be best - steel is more durable and will soak up more in the way of bumps, but aluminum is lighter. Does anyone know if aluminum handles better off-road? An awful lot of mountain bikes seem to be made with aluminum frames.

    Suspension - that's a personal choice. Suspension sucks up energy that would go into propelling the bike forward. If a good fraction of your riding is on rough roads or off-road, a front suspension might fit the bill. Suspension forks (at least good ones) also allow you to dial the suspension off, usually without even dismounting.

    If you want strong brakes, disc brakes have a reputation for awesome stopping power, even though they're not as bulletproof.

    What you're looking for is pretty specific. If you're even a little mechanically inclined and willing to do a lot of research (and it sounds like you are), going the route of building up from a frame or modifying a used hardtail might be the way to go.
    Tour Journals, Blog, ride pix

    I'm in the celtic folk fusion band Baroque and Hungry. "Mended", our new full-length studio album, is now available for download.

  10. #10
    Senior Member spthealien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    Giant Deny Advanced, GT Avalanche, Giant Seek
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Maybe not a Seek 0, but a Seek 1 (so that you've got that triple up front). Hydraulic discs, rack mounts--even on the fork, fast, and the ability to run some cyclocross tires.

  11. #11
    Senior Member neilfein's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Highland Park, NJ, USA
    My Bikes
    "Hildy", a Novara Randonee touring bike; a 16-speed Bike Friday Tikit; Dahon Curve D3 folding bike; a green around-town cruiser; and a Specialized Stumpjumper frame-based built-up MTB.
    Posts
    3,778
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Elwood, what's your budget for this project?
    Tour Journals, Blog, ride pix

    I'm in the celtic folk fusion band Baroque and Hungry. "Mended", our new full-length studio album, is now available for download.

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northern BC
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To put a number on it, I would say around $1500.

    Basically I am after something that is above all dependable and comfortable for a very long time. If I can get away with spending $1000 to get to work, school, and the grocery store- sweet deal!! I not too concerned with weight or a bike's ability to function as a mobile day trading office and investment bank with warp drive and electric hair curlers.

    I'm still a student, so I don't have a lot of cash. One of the things that I can't stand is saving a little money and be stuck with something that doesn't work right for whatever reason.

    I guess that is a little more than, "Elwood, what's your budget for this project?"

    EB

    PS- Loving the feedback!!

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northern BC
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Any thoughts on a Brodie Infinity? Compared to a LHT?

  14. #14
    Senior Member coldfeet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,118
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So, you're not going off road at all? Just busted up pavement? Might not do what you need, but is a cheap experiment. Old school rigid mountain bike, that will take 2.3" big Apples. Steel chainrings, 8 speed cassette so avoid the skinnier chain.

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northern BC
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'll be going off road.

    It's just that what some people think is "off-road" is actually most asphalt around here.

    EB

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,088
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwood Blues View Post
    Any thoughts on a Brodie Infinity? Compared to a LHT?
    Looks interesting... Flat bar on the Brodie rather than the drop bar on the LHT. Shimano hydraulic disc brakes are a big win over the LHT's Tektro canilevers.

    Tires and wheels are what worry me. Brodie's website says the tires are "Kenda Kwest 28c". If that means 700x28, it sure doesn't look like you could squeeze anything much larger into the frame. For me, that would be a problem: I won't ride an aluminum frame unless is can hold 700x32 tires (or larger).

    Wheels are also a mystery... Brodie's specs say they're Kore Gradient II. Kore says the Gradient II wheels have 24F/28R spokes, but Brodie's picture makes it look the 32F/32R. Either is fine for on-road riding. For touring, loaded commuting, or off-road riding I'd probably want something a bit more stout than the Gradient II.

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northern BC
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Also another manufacturer that I have access to out here is Opus Bikes (http://www.opusbike.com). Any ideas on them?

    I really like some of the Soma and Salsa designs but there are not any dealers out here.

    Keep the comments and ideas coming!! I check this thread often.

    EB

  18. #18
    Senior Member socalrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Upland, CA
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Liege, Motorola Team Issue Eddy Mercxk, Surly Crosscheck Cyclocross bike, Fisher Supercaliber Mtn. Bike
    Posts
    5,002
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here is a pic of my crosscheck.. I have since switched the chainrings out for a 48/38/24 combo so it makes it easier riding on the trails of our local mountains..

    The crosscheck is very much a do everything bike.. Many people have also done long touring on these rigs..
    Attached Images Attached Images

  19. #19
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North Aurora, IL
    My Bikes
    Road & Hybrid
    Posts
    5,520
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Specialized Crosstrail, the one with lockout front suspension (I'd recommend the Elite)...... Fat (45) tires to soak up the bumps, eyelets and dropouts - lots of room for fenders and racks. 700C wheels for easier rolling, front suspension to help soak up the bumps when you need it, big tires to finish that job, lock it out, (easily) when you don't need or want it, wide bar for easy maneuverability. 9 speed triple, lets you ride up a tree if you can get traction, and still likes to go fast on the downhills. Trigger shifters work like a dream. A good choice for "almost off-road," while still on the roadway.

    Try to get the tires changed to something more flat resistant, (like Schwalbe Marathon Supremes) before you take delivery. A 35 on the front will give excellent and more precise steering and better handling, without compromising the ride or handling, and a 40 in the rear still gives good comfort, and better handling, without compromising the cushy ride - my personal choice.

    Easily doable within your budget - and I think they still do one with disc brakes, if needed. But, the V-brakes, with Kool Stop Salmon pads are awesome stoppers. Even the OEM pads are darned good. Lots of size choice available, and good componentry.

    And, I really like the aluminum frame. It doesn't seem harsh, like lots of people think about aluminum. And, it sure is responsive.
    Last edited by Wanderer; 04-30-10 at 06:44 AM.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  20. #20
    Geek In Training
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio
    My Bikes
    Cannondale T700 (1999), Trek Multitrack 730 (1997), Bianchi Veloce (1999)
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Novara Safari?

  21. #21
    VoodooChile zoste's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    AZ
    My Bikes
    Salsa Casseroll
    Posts
    1,048
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwood Blues View Post
    Also another manufacturer that I have access to out here is Opus Bikes (http://www.opusbike.com). Any ideas on them?

    I really like some of the Soma and Salsa designs but there are not any dealers out here.

    Keep the comments and ideas coming!! I check this thread often.

    EB
    I'm not sure of the Soma, but Salsa is sold through QBP. Pretty much any LBS can order a Salsa for you. It's no longer necessary to go to an "authorized dealer".

    I've had a Salsa Casseroll for almost two years now and my bike has performed flawlessly. I'm a big fan of the brand, so I'd recommend the Vaya or Fargo.
    Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

  22. #22
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Camp Hill, Pennsyltucky
    My Bikes
    07 Raliegh Grand Sport 98ish Mongoose Manuever
    Posts
    2,099
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A Specialized Tricross Sport would fit the bill nicely.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Loose Chain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    USA
    My Bikes
    84 Pinarello Trevisio, 86 Guerciotti SLX, 96 Specialized Stumpjumper, 2010 Surly Cross Check, 86 Centurion Ironman, 88 Centurion Prestige
    Posts
    1,177
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Surly Cross Check, don't want no stink'n 26 inch wheels, other than that the LHT is a good bet, more relaxed than the CC.

    I am not big but I am pretty strong and this bike is a tank, not in weight but in the way it inspires confidence no matter the surface or task. Of course, in the age of fragile 16 pound carbon crap, a 23 to 26 pound (depends on equipment) Surly Cross Check is not exactly under built.

    JFYI, not completely universal, but for a given bicycle, getting the frame size to the smaller size of your fit range will produce a more aggressive bike with higher saddle and lower bars, getting a bike to the larger size of your fit range will give a more relaxed bike with a lower saddle respective to the bars.
    Last edited by Loose Chain; 04-30-10 at 10:59 AM.

  24. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Northern BC
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi all,

    So I finally carved out some time from my work schedule to get on some bikes at a LBS. Anyway I found out a bunch of things that will guide me in the quest for a new ride. First off, I don't think that I'm ready for a bike with drop bars. After riding one, it was not very confidence inspiring and the geometry felt really crammed. I tried a couple of hybrid style bikes, and found those to be more to my liking. The carbon fork makes a lot of difference around here.

    Now that I have a better idea of what "comfort" is to me, any ideas on performance hybrid style bikes? The two I rode yesterday were the Trek 7.5 and the DeVinci Amsterdam.

    Thanks for the input!!

    EB

  25. #25
    Guest
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Grid Reference, SK
    My Bikes
    I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
    Posts
    3,769
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good quality hybrid (~$800 and up) are generally very good bikes.

    If I were you I would get one without suspension and make sure it has all the mounts for racks and fenders and trailers or whatever you plan on using.

    Just make sure the bike fits well and that the shop where you buy it is willing to fine tune the fit to handle any minor problems. A cheap derailleur or broken spoke is easy to fix. Sore shoulders and back are harder to take care of.

    Edit: 29" is the same as 700C - the wheels and tires from a 700C hybrid will fit on a 29" wheel mtb... if a mtb has the best fit and all the features you want then that could be the best bike.
    IMHO, 700C/29" is a better size wheel for a multi purpose bike because of the availability of different tires... 26" selection at most shops is sort of limited to one or two street tires and a handful of 2" + knobbies. I currently have the following tires for my touring bike: 35mm CX tires, 38mm road tires, 25mm road tires, 1.9" studded winter tires, 28mm road tires... and a few more skinny tires that get used on my road bike from time to time. I can get useful replacements for all (except maybe the winter tires) at just about any bike shop or Canadian tire if I am desperate.
    Last edited by LarDasse74; 05-01-10 at 07:27 PM.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •