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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 04-29-10, 06:50 AM   #1
Crazy88s
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Pedals for a mountain bike

I just recently purchased a new mountain bike and I'm trying to decide on a pedal. I'm quite comfortable with my clipless spd pedals on my road bike so I'm thinking of getting the same for the mountain bike.

I've never really ridden a true mountain bike course before but I imagine I'll fall more often than on my road bike. Being new, should I stick with clips or since I'm use to the clipless just go ahead and get those. I'm thinking I'll get more power out of the clipless than the clips.

I'm thinking of getting these pedals: http://www.performancebike.com/webap...551_1033476_-1
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Old 04-29-10, 06:56 AM   #2
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In my opinion you will probably find yourself fallling over more from attempting to ride with clips than if you just stuck with clipless. The movement required to get out is completely different between the two. Now that you're muscle memory is to twist out good luck retraining yourself to pull back to get out.

If you're already riding clipless just stick with clipless, but if you're nervous about being clipped in on a trail try flat pedals for awhile until you get used to mountain biking then go clipless.
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Old 04-29-10, 07:59 AM   #3
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For what it's worth, I switched to Shimano SPD pedals on my mountain bike and have grown to really appreciate them. They work well and my shins are very thankful for it.
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Old 04-29-10, 09:21 AM   #4
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Mountain bike riders either use clipless pedals or they use flat pedals without any sort of retention system. I think that's because pedals with cages and straps are too difficult to get in and out of when the terrain turns marginal.

When I started mountain biking, I tried Crank Brothers Eggbeater and Candy clipless pedals. For me, the 15- or 20-degree release angle made it very difficult to unclip before falling over. I sold all of my CB pedals and installed Shimano M520 SPD pedals on all of my bikes. Adjustable release tension combined with the SH56 multi-release cleat makes them a great pedal for off-road use or clipless pedal newbies...
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Old 04-29-10, 10:27 AM   #5
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Forget the knock-offs and get M520s or better from Shimano. They work!
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Old 04-29-10, 10:46 AM   #6
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Forget the knock-offs and get M520s or better from Shimano. They work!
$15 more (I've found them at shops for $50 which brings it down to $11 difference). Worth the price to keep it standard among bikes. Knock offs are just not exactly right sometimes. So eventhough they say SPD comaptible, there are differneces at time. I go from one bike to another and the pedals don't work exactly right. Since I use the same shoes on several bikes, I stay witht the 520's on all of them. Stuff you learn over the years.

Notice I said "sometimes" which means some may be exact, but it's a gamble finding out! I've had problems with Performance pedals and Tioga matching the Shimano SPD's (pre 520 model, don't remember the model #)
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Old 04-29-10, 11:37 AM   #7
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You could also get a campus pedal that has platforms on one side and the retention mechanism on the other side. I have Shimano 520s on the road bike, another Shimano SPD on the single speed, the Carves on the mountain bike, and platforms on the commuter. I can't really tell the difference among the clipless pedals using the same shoes.

I definitely would stay clear from the strap style. Getting stuck in them mountain biking late in the 90's put me in the hospital.
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Old 04-29-10, 12:30 PM   #8
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$15 more (I've found them at shops for $50 which brings it down to $11 difference).
I buy M520s on sale. Don't think I've ever paid more than $35-40. Nashbar has M520s for $45. If you order $75 or more today, you get 20% off which makes the M520s $36. JensonUSA has them for $39 and they frequently have 10%-off coupons. At that price, it doesn't make sense to buy an off-brand pedal...
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Old 04-29-10, 12:53 PM   #9
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I used to have different pedals for my road and mountain bike - but that just got confusing especially trying to get a cleat adjustment right. Now I use the same brand/model pedal on both bikes (TIme ATAC) just suing the road version for one bike and the MTB/platform version for the other. Plus - I can switch out shoes since hte cleats are the same (which is handy when I forget and grab the wrong ones)!!! And I now only use a MTB shoe for both bikes (Sidi Dominators) so I can walk around.

Great thing about SPDs many models to choose from for road and mtb...
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Old 04-29-10, 02:19 PM   #10
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Oh man! It's even cheaper here: http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=P0003

Not to mention, there's a 5% off code: usarbr that brings it to $33.99. I have purchased from them before, and it took about a week to fly over the pond to my door. Keep in mind, many US credit cards will charge a little bit for the British charge.
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Old 04-29-10, 03:28 PM   #11
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I like Time's MTB pedals because pushing on the bottom (due to a boulder strike, etc.) does not release the spring on the top. On other pedals the springs are connected so pushing on one side releases the other. The aluminums are very durable while the ATAC adjustability is nice for reasons mentioned above (how much heel twist is required to pop out, how much float is available, etc.). I have abused a set of ATACs over the past 2 years (daily commute, rain, dirt trails, etc.) and they have held up well. I have not slogged through super-thick mud so can't comment on their self-cleaning abilities but other MTBers have been impressed with their mud performance.

I agree with the statement of using the same cleat system on all your bikes (I use MTB shoes on everything but I have the float set differently). This eliminates showing up with the wrong shoes, etc.
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Old 04-29-10, 07:14 PM   #12
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Thanks for the advice guys! I'm in no rush to buy them so I will be on the look out for a pair of MTB shoes and the 520 pedals. In the meantime, I'll just use the pedals that came with the bike and take the clips I bought back to the store. I love this forum!
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Old 04-30-10, 02:57 AM   #13
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Unfortunately, due to ankle surgery a few years back I am forced to go with platforms, and I must say the Speedplay Drillium along with Five Ten Impact 2 Low shoes make me feel as if I was riding clipless, in theory of course, haha.

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Old 04-30-10, 03:30 AM   #14
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I like Time's MTB pedals because pushing on the bottom (due to a boulder strike, etc.) does not release the spring on the top. On other pedals the springs are connected so pushing on one side releases the other. The aluminums are very durable while the ATAC adjustability is nice for reasons mentioned above (how much heel twist is required to pop out, how much float is available, etc.). I have abused a set of ATACs over the past 2 years (daily commute, rain, dirt trails, etc.) and they have held up well. I have not slogged through super-thick mud so can't comment on their self-cleaning abilities but other MTBers have been impressed with their mud performance.

I agree with the statement of using the same cleat system on all your bikes (I use MTB shoes on everything but I have the float set differently). This eliminates showing up with the wrong shoes, etc.
+1 on time pedals.. Much better mud clearance the float is very smooth which is a big plus over Shimano pedals..

The Alium is there lower end: http://www.speedgoat.com/Catalog.asp...C147&Prod=9088
The Atac XS is midrange: http://www.speedgoat.com/Catalog.asp...C147&Prod=3930
The Time Z are the larger platform model: http://www.speedgoat.com/Catalog.asp...C147&Prod=2336

reviews on MTBR: http://www.mtbr.com/cat/drivetrain/P...73_135crx.aspx
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Old 04-30-10, 11:21 AM   #15
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With the SPDs use the silver cleats instead of the black cleats so that they disengage a little easier. Also set the tension low so that it is very easy to unclip. The momement you fel yourself slowing down, push one of your heals out and inclip. If you end of regaining momentum, then push against the pedal again and reclip. I have to deal with this on parts of my Winter ride home when I have to but through some local roads in an ajacement development where the roads get get a few inches of thick snow. That stuff can get the front end of the bike going all over. I leared very quickly how to unclip fast so I could catch myself.

Having matching pedal types one various bikes also makes is very simple to switch between them.

Happy riding,
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Old 04-30-10, 02:57 PM   #16
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So Performance Bike had the Shimano 520 pedals on sale for $44.99 so I bought them. Now that I have the pedals I need a pair of MTB shoes. Unfortunately I can't find any cheap shoes in size 44 anywhere.
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Old 04-30-10, 04:44 PM   #17
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To add a bit more to socal's post, the Time Z are indeed platforms but the springs are NOT recessed. In other words, they are great for downhill MTB but not meant to be used for street shoe pedaling. I had originally been thinking about those platforms so I could pedal with street or bike shoes but opted for the XS after seeing the Z's. I have the XS but am noticing that the prices have jumped considerably since I purchased them... the aliums would be the best option for most people given the pricing structure.
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Old 05-01-10, 04:16 PM   #18
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Well forget the idea of clipless pedals (for the time being). Went out on my first real trail riding adventure with my friend using the platform pedals that came with the bike. I fell a couple of times but I imagine I would have fallen at least 20 times had I used clipless pedals. For the time being, I'm just going to buy some non-plastic platform pedals with some nice grips on them.
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Old 05-01-10, 04:20 PM   #19
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It is a good idea to start out with platforms...particularly if you are just learning off-road techniques. If you want to switch to clipless later that is cool but, as a beginner you may get frustrated with clips.

Stay away from toe-straps. Run.
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