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-   -   Eat to Live! (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/641254-eat-live.html)

Ewanick 04-30-10 03:45 AM

Eat to Live!
 
NOTE: This is my short interpretation of the book that has possibly changed my life forever, if you are interested in my brief understanding of the book, please do purchase it or loan it from your local library so that you may understand it for yourself. After reading all I have written it sounds much like a professional book review, and I must say that I am just your average life loving human being, so please do not think I am a paid promoter or what not, I just want to share with everyone a great find.

Quick fact! "Did you know that Americans currently consume about 42% of their calories from fiberless animal foods and another 51% from highly processed refined carbohydrates and extracted oils. Almost half of all vegetables consumed are potatoes, and half of the potatoes consumed are in the form of fries or chips?" Did you keep track of the percentages? Well, if you didn't that leaves 7%! Yea, that is right 7% to fruit and vegetable consumption.

Eat to Live by Joel Fuhrman, M.D. is a great read. It is not quite a diet book, but it could be for some, but the overall goal of Joel is to encourage people to "eat to live" rather than to diet, lose their weight, and go back to eating just as they did before they lost the weight.

Joel encourages a 90/10 diet (food consumption, not the fad term), and by that I mean 90% fruits and vegetables and 10% meat, bread, dairy, sweets, etc. Joel also encourages that you shy away from eating processed foods completely; no frozen meals, no canned food, no "artificial" anything; eat UNREFINED plant foods. You may be asking the question "why limit animal products and dairy to only 10%?" most can understand the bread, pasta and white rice because of the "simple" carbohydrates, but the reason to limit meat and dairy is for the reason at the nutrient to calorie ratio (this is also a big part of the book, nutrient to calorie ratio will give you an idea of what is best to eat over something else), they are MUCH MUCH lower than that of unrefined fruits and vegetables.

The main goal of eating this way is to eat as little fat, "simple" carbohydrates and sugar (excluding natural sugar from fruit) as you can; as they turn into fat once digested by the body. This way of eating allows the body to receive all of the nutrients needed, on VERY little fat, thus using the fat that is already on the body as energy, rather than using the food consumed; which is a common problem for people who try to diet. People think that eating smaller portions help (still eating, meat, dairy and pasta), when actually it hurts because the body still digests the food into fat instead of using the fat that is already on your body. Secondly, with the idea of smaller portioning, you are starving your body of all the vital nutrients that it needs to function because you are eating smaller portions of food, let alone the wrong food. At the beginning of eating you will see that you will lose quite a bit of weight, and then begin to slowly lose less and less weight until you come to your "natural" body weight; when you stop losing weight completely.

Here are the main points of eating in the first six weeks of the start to "eating to live". The restrictions on some foods are lifted later:

1. Salad is the main dish; eat it first at lunch and dinner - this is because you tend to eat more of whatever you consume first because at this time you are the hungriest
2. Eat as much fresh fruit as you wish, but at least four fresh fruit daily - four whole fruits will run an average of 250 calories
3. Variety is the spice of life, particularly when it comes to greens - eat as many vegetables as you like, the more the better though be sure to heed point #4
4. Beware of starchy vegetables - limit to one cup a day
5. Eat beans or legumes every day - eat an entire cup daily, or more if you chose and the best thing is that they help prevent food cravings
6. Eliminate animal and dairy products - no dairy for the first six weeks, limit meat to either fish (white) or egg whites once or twice a week
7. Have a tablespoon of ground flaxseed every day - daily dose of omega-3 which help prevent diabtetes, heart disease and cancer
8. Consume nuts and seeds in limited amounts, not more than an ounce per day
9. Eat lots of mushrooms all the time - mushrooms make a great replacement for meat
10. Keep it simple

Breakfast, lunch and dinner simplified:

Breakfast - Fresh fruit
Lunch - Salad, beans on top, and more fresh fruit
Dinner - Salad and two cooked vegetables (1lb.), fruit dessert

At this point you must think that Joel is either a radical vegetarian or a hardcore vegan, but he offers both vegetarian and non vegetarian options. There are also many chapters in this book about how to help/prevent a range of health problems, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, high blood pressure, etc. I will also say, that I am not implying that people who eat meat, as well as dairy, bread, pasta and rice are bad for doing so. I have come to the understanding that there are better options/ways out there and eat accordingly. But, I will finsih with; that I HIGHLY recommend this book, if you plan to diet and lose weight, or to follow the book to "Eat to Live", please give it a read, it might change your life.

youcoming 04-30-10 04:35 AM

I hope this works for you and good luck. If I sound sceptical you're right, the only "diet" that works is one that you can work with. If you can limit yourself to eating what is listed in book great, but try just changing how you eat. AS for carbs all veggies and ffruit are carbs and for some cyclists the complex carbs are just not enough to maintain prefered level, simple carbs can be our friends in the proper portion and time.

Ewanick 04-30-10 04:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by youcoming (Post 10744953)
I hope this works for you and good luck. If I sound sceptical you're right, the only "diet" that works is one that you can work with. If you can limit yourself to eating what is listed in book great, but try just changing how you eat. AS for carbs all veggies and ffruit are carbs and for some cyclists the complex carbs are just not enough to maintain prefered level, simple carbs can be our friends in the proper portion and time.

I completely agree with you youcoming, I posted this for a reference for the many people who come into the clydesdale forum, as well as the biking world in general to lose weight. When I was much smaller, before my surgery, pasta was my best friend before a long ride. Also, to your reference of changing how to eat, the book actually tells you that you can pretty much eat anything, but only in moderation for certain foods. I would say, myself being vegetarian, "following the book" comes with ease so I guess it sounds easier to me than it would to others. Also, in reference to being a vegetarian, it has let me know how to eat healthier, because unfortunately most of us vegetarians eat a good bit of cheese, bread, pasta and meat alternatives.

billyymc 04-30-10 06:10 AM

Man...your post was complex enough, the book must be murder. You probably lose weight just carrying the book around!

Keep it simpler than this. There are a lot of simple guidelines. One that I like is the "No-S Diet": No Snacks, No Seconds, No Sweets. Except on days that start with S, Sometimes. http://www.nosdiet.com/ I think for more active people it needs to be adapted a bit, but the general principle works. For example, I usually eat four "meals" a day -- it just works better for me. This guy did get a book deal, after having his site up for a few years -- but all the info you need is on his site. Or in what I wrote above.

Here's another one...and I forget who this was from...I think I read it in the NY Times a couple years ago: Eat real food. Not too much. And exercise.

And here's mine: Don't eat after dinner. Don't drink soda. Turn off the TV. Go outside.

A little Pasta a couple times a week is not what makes us fat. Nor is half a bagel and a banana for breakfast. Or an occassional homemade burger.

I'm going to add one more thing (vegans can stop reading!) -- choose your meats carefully. Pay a bit more for better quality. You'll eat less of it, and enjoy it more. And whenever you can, use meat as part of a dish, not as the main course.

Ewanick 04-30-10 06:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by billyymc (Post 10745099)
Man...your post was complex enough, the book must be murder. You probably lose weight just carrying the book around!

Keep it simpler than this. There are a lot of simple guidelines. One that I like is the "No-S Diet": No Snacks, No Seconds, No Sweets. Except on days that start with S, Sometimes. http://www.nosdiet.com/ I think for more active people it needs to be adapted a bit, but the general principle works. For example, I usually eat four "meals" a day -- it just works better for me. This guy did get a book deal, after having his site up for a few years -- but all the info you need is on his site. Or in what I wrote above.

Here's another one...and I forget who this was from...I think I read it in the NY Times a couple years ago: Eat real food. Not too much. And exercise.

And here's mine: Don't eat after dinner. Don't drink soda. Turn off the TV. Go outside.

A little Pasta a couple times a week is not what makes us fat. Nor is half a bagel and a banana for breakfast. Or an occassional homemade burger.

I'm going to add one more thing (vegans can stop reading!) -- choose your meats carefully. Pay a bit more for better quality. You'll eat less of it, and enjoy it more. And whenever you can, use meat as part of a dish, not as the main course.

Thank you for the feedback billyymc, the "no s" diet sounds like a good one. Keep in mind though, this is my interpretation of the book. To me, everything I have written in my post does not seem complex it seems to come second nature to me. Also, the book is not just about losing weight, it is about living healthily. As Joel mentions in the book, the reason that people enjoy foods high in fat, sugar and sodium are the fact that they taste good because that is what the body craves. After the six week starting plan in the book your body will start to crave the foods you have been eating, as well as the otherwise bland foods (when you are accustomed to high fat, sugar and sodium) will taste even better due to the chemical changes in your body. I am sure that this way of eating is unrealistic for many people, to follow the strict eating habits for the rest of your life. I personally will probably, and most likely, deviate now and then from the cycle; eating something sweet, or fattening once in a while but hopefully not too often. Though, time will tell once my six weeks are up! Lastly, do not let my interpretation hinder you from reading the book, I believe even if not to follow the "eat to live" book. It is a great $20 investment to learn about what foods provide the best nutrients, how certain foods react to the body, what foods prevents certain diseases and illnesses, etc.

minnesotamongo 04-30-10 06:55 AM

Well - I'm not sure of the long term value of the diet, but you must need to go to Sam's Club and buy cases of T-P! Wow - that is a "cleansing" diet!!

Shinnster 04-30-10 10:50 AM

been on this diet since jan 1st 2010. went from 300lb to 267. I was strict for the first 6 weeks, then took a long break, startd back up a week ago and continue to lose. It is a great diet once you get used to it. i'm hoping to get down to 240 before the year is up.

xray1978 04-30-10 12:51 PM

This sounds like a pretty common sense diet. Although, I think for those of us who are riding our bikes a lot protein should be more than 10% for muscle recovery. 4 oz boneless skinless chicken breast is only 90 cal with 22gr of protein with like, only 1/2 gr of fat.

Seattle Forrest 04-30-10 01:04 PM

I thought you were writing a review of How to Eat to Live, by Elijah Mohammad...

I follow most of the rules you've laid out in your review. The Forrest Diet is pretty 'simple:' eat fewer calories than you burn, every day. But to achieve that, I tend to do things like avoid potato chips and such, but I'll eat as much fruit and snacks as I want; they're almost exempt from the calorie rules. Which is rule #2 in what you posted.

A friend of mine is a neuro-scientist and specializes in the chemical messages that make up hunger and satiety. There's a lot going on at this level, so that when you're hungry, anything you eat is delicious. And this makes it easier to overeat ( especially if you eat quickly ) when it's been a while since your last meal. With this in mind, I've been trying to start more of my meals with a salad, since it's very light in terms of calories, but slows me down a bit, so that when I'm on the 'main' course, I've already got the worst of the hunger out of my system. I've been noticing that a big salad can fill me up, at least for a while, so it's good to read this has been working for other people. I'll have to keep it up. :)

gbg 04-30-10 03:13 PM

I love mushrooms, but heard they promote gout!

So
9. Eat lots of mushrooms all the time - mushrooms make a great replacement for meat9. Eat lots of mushrooms all the time - mushrooms make a great replacement for meat

might have to be done in moderation.

Daspydyr 04-30-10 03:17 PM

I feel so guilty for sneaking out to the donut shop earlier. But I did limit myself to 2 double chocolate.............

Seriously, I know I am better when I stick with salads and fish with a burger or nachos once a week. And I have saved mucho mulla as well. the 6 pack I bought for the Super Bowl lasted two months. Whatever system you buy into-DO IT!

Ewanick 05-01-10 12:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xray1978 (Post 10746806)
This sounds like a pretty common sense diet. Although, I think for those of us who are riding our bikes a lot protein should be more than 10% for muscle recovery. 4 oz boneless skinless chicken breast is only 90 cal with 22gr of protein with like, only 1/2 gr of fat.

Yes, this is very true. I personally, being vegetarian, eat quite a good bit of soy, legumes, beans, a day and use my 10% to have some milk to obtain the protein that I need. I am glad that somehow my body digests all of this well, because there is no gas for me!

InTheRain 05-03-10 12:31 PM

Sorry... but I completely disagree with the diet recommendation. But, everyone has to do their own research. This is the one that I believe:

http://zeroinginonhealth.com/

Zero carbs. It's not an easy diet, but I don't find being a vegetarian easy either (and... it's not such a great idea for my health - diabetes, which is a carbohydrate metabolism disorder.)

Just a contradicting viewpoint...


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