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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 04-30-10, 02:20 PM   #1
bbrass
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Greetings and Salutations: New Bike and (hopefully) new me

Hello everyone,

I've been trolling the forums for about 2 months, debating first on whether or not to buy a bike, and then what bike to buy.

I made the choice today, and will be going to my LBS (look at me, first post and I'm already using slang =P) to pick up the Giant Sedona I test rode last week.

I'm about 6'4" and 375 lbs, and my main motivation for biking is to get a bit healthier, and hopefully fit into my suit jacket again before the next person in my family gets married.

I've gotta say, when I test rode the bike, it was the most fun I've had in a long time, I really felt like a little kid again.

I wanted to ask everyone what, if any, accessories I might find useful when riding (for both commutes and pleasure), any advice on helmets, any possibly a cyclometer (want to log my rides and track my weight loss, if any)

Thank you everyone for the advice I've already gotten from trolling (mainly the decision to go from Wallyworld to my LBS) and I hope this will continue to be a valuable resource for me, and that I can maybe contribute something to the awesome community here at bikeforums.net.

Thanks!
Ben
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Old 04-30-10, 02:46 PM   #2
spthealien
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Awesome. Welcome to the group.

I was thinking about that bike when I was looking for a commuter bike.

What you may need: a rack and panniers to store stuff, a cool (temperature) helmet, and some inexpensive cyclocomputer you can get for around $15 at Target (if you wanted to log your miles).
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Old 04-30-10, 03:01 PM   #3
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Congratulations! That is a great bike!

The first thing I would get is a helmet. I'd also recommend you have a little seat pack with a spare tube, tire levers, a patch kit and either a small pump or CO2 inflation gadget. You'll want to be prepared to change a tube if you should get a flat.

Have fun!! And post some pictures of your new ride when you can!!
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Old 04-30-10, 03:02 PM   #4
EKW in DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbrass View Post
I've been trolling the forums for about 2 months, debating first on whether or not to buy a bike, and then what bike to buy.
Not sure trolling is the word you want to use... perhaps lurking?

Regardless, welcome! And congrats on the new bike, Ben! Good luck with your goals. Cycling is a LOT of fun, and it can certainly help you lose wight and get fit.

As for accessories:

Flat kit (like Nola_gal said)

Rack and trunk rack or panniers: I have the Topeak Explorer rack and Topeak EXP rack trunk. It has fold down side panniers and I use it every day for commuting. Very convenient and the MTX track system is super convenient.

Lights: Rear blinkie at the very least. If you're going to commute, and it sounds like you're interested in that, make sure you get a front light, too. Depending on how much of your riding time to/from work would be in the dark, it could be anything from a front blinkie to a more powerful lighting system (like a Magicshine). My budget was tight, and I settled for a Planet Light front blinkie (to be seen) and a Terralux 220 lumen flashlight mounted to my handlebars to see where I'm going when it's darker. Twofish lockblocks are great for mounting a headlight securely.

Lock: Depending on where you'd park when commuting or running errands by bike, you'll want a good lock.

As for helmet, I have a big melon (7-7/8 hat size). I use the Bell Triton, which is specifically designed for larger heads. It fits me comfortably whereas regular "one size fits all" helmets were too small to be comfortable. Other options listed here if you have a big cabeza like me.

I tend to ride the same places and the same routes over and over. Nature of the beast for a commuter cyclist sometimes. I don't have a cyclocomputer yet, and it's not a big issue. I want one, but have survived happily through a year-plus of regular cycling w/o one. I do keep track of mileage and my weight. I just use an Excel spreadsheet. I've computed my mileage for my various routes using Google Maps, mapmyride.com, and more recently ridewithgps.com. If I go for a weekend ride and I don't know the mileage, I find it fun to relive the ride on the map and see where I went. Helps provide a sense of accomplishment, too, to see where you went UNDER YOUR OWN POWER.

I could go into more detail or write more, but this post is already long enough, and I'm sure I'll be just one voice out of many to respond.

Anyway, welcome, enjoy the ride, and have fun with it!

And don't be a troll...
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Old 04-30-10, 04:34 PM   #5
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Don't go out and buy a bunch of gear, buy it as you discover a need. Start with a spare tube, tire levers (and learn how to use them), some method of inflating tires, and a helmet. If you find yourself riding on the road a lot then you may want to think about increasing visibility (reflective clothing, blinkers, lights, etc.). If you do a lot of commuting, you may want to look at panniers instead of a backpack. Cycling specific clothing may be added depending on comfort levels or mileage. To measure miles any cheap cyclocomputer will work (be sure to adjust the settings for your wheel size).

At this point don't complicate things, just go out and ride. Make sure the LBS does a basic fitting for you (seat & handlebar height, etc.). Report back with any issues you are having and we'll try to help...
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Old 05-03-10, 07:13 AM   #6
bbrass
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Thanks for all the advice everyone, this kind of response to a newbie is why I decided to register on the forums instead of just lurking.

My LBS saw the "sucker" sticker on my forehead and sold me some extras when I went in to buy my bike, but I feel a lot better now that you all have second'd the items. I ended up getting a couple tire levers, an extra tube, and a clippy-air pump (morph mini) that hooks on to the... braze-ons? (I think thats what their called, my first thought was braziers, but I know thats wrong =P)

Next on my list is a helmet, a front light, and a rear "blinkie," as my local law requires me to have at least the front light when riding at night.

Got my first example of the good advice I got here about going to my LBS, my buddy, whom I plan to ride with, bought a bike at wallyworld, and when he was riding, one of his pedals broke off... So yea, glad I shelled out the extra bucks for the Giant.

Also got the tires filled with "goo," as my area (Western KS) and town specifically are bad for stickers and glass.

Another piece of good news, when I was at the LBS with my girlfriend, and I was talking to the owner about adjusting everything etc..., I noticed she was eying a women's Sedona... Long story short, we left the shop with 2 bikes =) Mine is dark grey with dark blue, and hers is light grey with light blue, so they compliment each other nicely =).

Thanks again for the advice everyone, I'll try and post pictures when I can.

Also, does anyone geo-cache while riding? Seems like these two activities would go great together.

Last edited by bbrass; 05-03-10 at 07:30 AM. Reason: added
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Old 05-03-10, 03:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Also got the tires filled with "goo," as my area (Western KS) and town specifically are bad for stickers and glass.
If you have flat issues then thicker tires with Kevlar lining might help.

Quote:
I ended up getting a couple tire levers, an extra tube, and a clippy-air pump
Yep, you'll need those.

Quote:
Next on my list is a helmet, a front light, and a rear "blinkie," as my local law requires me to have at least the front light when riding at night.
Keep in mind that you can get flashlight mount kits (or just 2 zip ties)... there isn't a need for bike specific lighting. Check out the electronics forum on this site... there are plenty of suggestions and options.
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