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  1. #1
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    Hi.. Need seat Suggestions for aquired bike

    Hi all,
    This is my first post here so thank you in advance for any help you can provide.
    I am a big man in excess of 400+ pounds on a mission to drop some weight. I just aquired a sturdy Mountain Bike t hat actually works just fine except for one thing.. The seat... the seat is very painful on my butt area. Any good ideas for a good big butt seat? A friend of mine just got a cloud 9 type seat and will be trying it out. I really want a recumbent, but the one that is meant for my weight is in excess of $1500. Any seat suggestions?

  2. #2
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    When I was 335 pounds, a Cannondale full gel seat was the most comfortable for me. I'd go for a name brand larger gel seat. As I made my way down to 290 I switched to a conventional skinny seat and it's working well. Best wishes. Develop those leg muscles at 400 and you'll be kicking a$$ when you get to 200.

  3. #3
    I am the Snail~! Peter_C's Avatar
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    Hello and welcome to BF~!

    I am *not* an expert, and many will disagree with me...

    Two points first:

    1) You and I are 'Uber-Clydes' - so I believe that the normal thinking may not apply to us (that being that padding is a bad thing)
    2) Many posters are on a road-bkie-type bicycle, whereas the bike you are on, and the bike I am on, gives us a more upright riding position, with more weight on our butts.

    The above said, what works for me, may not work for you. Buying a seat from an LBS that has a really nice 30 day swap policy, and, has 5-8 seats for you to *try* out on your bike right there is a big plus!

    I ended up getting a Cloud-9 seat. It's super comfortable for the first 10-15 miles (multiple days in a row too) - but, after bout 30 miles I find myself shifting around a fair bit, and then not comfortable on it the very next day (but fine the day after that).

    Again - am not an expert - but simply going to a LBS set up to let you try some out - will help you greatly. When I got mine, Sam had 5-8 seats already mounted on seat posts, so he would put one on my bike, I would ride a bit, then he'd put another on, rinse and repeat.

    Again, welcome
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  4. #4
    Real Human Being wild animals's Avatar
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    It isn't as ideal as an LBS with tester saddles or a good return policy, but Performance Bike and REI both take returns on anything for any reason at any time (even years later). I'm not sure if LL Bean stocks saddles in their stores, but they have the same policy.
    Go until you stop, then take a break.

  5. #5
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    If you just acquired the bicycle, you may need to give your butt some more time to "break in". If it has been many years (decades?) since your last ride then you need to give your rear end some time to get used to being on a saddle again. Ride the bike as-is for at least two months. Under no circumstances should you buy a mega wide saddle or a gel cover. They are comfy at first, but once you start riding further (and as noted by PeterC) that gel will squish up into areas it shouldn't be and cause you discomfort. But then again, if a big squishy saddle is what it takes to get you out riding regularly, then go for it.

    If after two months the saddle doesn't feel any better, go to bicycle shop that sells Specialized bikes. Once there, have a seat on the ass-o-meter. Yes, it's a real thing. It measures your lower pelvis where it makes contact with the saddle. Once you have that measurement they can look up a proper saddle width for you. You might be surprised to learn that the size you require could be quite narrow. Anyways, saddle choice is very personal. Just about everyone on the forums will try and force feed you a Brooks B-17 or Imperial...rectally. My saddle choice is: stock. I believe the ass is mightier than the saddle, several thousand miles later...my theory holds true.

    Happy riding !

  6. #6
    I am the Snail~! Peter_C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bautieri View Post
    If you just acquired the bicycle, you may need to give your butt some more time to "break in". If it has been many years (decades?) since your last ride then you need to give your rear end some time to get used to being on a saddle again. Ride the bike as-is for at least two months. Under no circumstances should you buy a mega wide saddle or a gel cover. They are comfy at first, but once you start riding further (and as noted by PeterC) that gel will squish up into areas it shouldn't be and cause you discomfort. But then again, if a big squishy saddle is what it takes to get you out riding regularly, then go for it.

    If after two months the saddle doesn't feel any better, go to bicycle shop that sells Specialized bikes. Once there, have a seat on the ass-o-meter. Yes, it's a real thing. It measures your lower pelvis where it makes contact with the saddle. Once you have that measurement they can look up a proper saddle width for you. You might be surprised to learn that the size you require could be quite narrow. Anyways, saddle choice is very personal. Just about everyone on the forums will try and force feed you a Brooks B-17 or Imperial...rectally. My saddle choice is: stock. I believe the ass is mightier than the saddle, several thousand miles later...my theory holds true.

    Happy riding !
    +1

    (side-note) Do you think that is why after 400+ miles on this seat, I start getting sore after bout 30 miles? Or, is a certain amount of soreness to be expected at my size?
    Peter_C
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  7. #7
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter_C View Post
    +1

    (side-note) Do you think that is why after 400+ miles on this seat, I start getting sore after bout 30 miles? Or, is a certain amount of soreness to be expected at my size?
    In an effort not to threadjack, PM sent.

  8. #8
    Senior Member canopus's Avatar
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    I don't believe the ass is mightier than the saddle. You can live with stock saddles but sometimes they just don't cut it, no matter how calloused that area is.. I have probably spent 500 in saddles this last year. I finally found the shape I can sit on then modified it so that i have no problems now (It is a leather titanico that I cut out) Before then I had tried a topeak,measured for my sit bones, had problems within the first 15 miles on my SR300 but kept it to use on the cruiser because it felt nice when sitting in an upright position. Then a Brooks B-17, not bad, did my first century on it, but still had problem around the 80 mile mark, I just could not get comfortable after that distance. Then I got a Champion Flyer Special, again same problems around the the 80 mile mark, then finally the Selle An-Atomica without the cut out, rode it and it felt good, then I got a Selle An-Atomica with the cut-out, clyde edition, I liked like it so i cut out my first one almost in the same fashion but didn't cut out the butt section and love it. Did 113 miles on it this last week and could have kept going.

    Some saddles are going to feel good for 10-20-10 miles then all of the sudden they don't feel good anymore. A well fitted saddle will go longer and will disappear under you. You won't notice it after 50-80-150 miles. Thats not to say you won't get chaffing and soreness but the saddle itself won't be the cause of your discomfort. Width can be an issue, especially at the uber-clyde level of the OP but i don't think its as big as the manufacturers are making it out to be. I believe your bike riding position dictates your saddle width more than anything else.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by canopus View Post
    I don't believe the ass is mightier than the saddle.
    the saddle needs ot be wide enough to support the ischial tuberosities (the "sit bones") in the normal riding position. If it's not, you're sitting on soft tissue. That's painful, and can cause nerve damage. No reason to put up with that, just for the sake of being stupid.

    Two months is an awfully long time to put up with a poorly fitting saddle.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter_C View Post
    Hello and welcome to BF~!

    I am *not* an expert, and many will disagree with me...

    Two points first:

    1) You and I are 'Uber-Clydes' - so I believe that the normal thinking may not apply to us (that being that padding is a bad thing)
    2) Many posters are on a road-bkie-type bicycle, whereas the bike you are on, and the bike I am on, gives us a more upright riding position, with more weight on our butts.

    The above said, what works for me, may not work for you. Buying a seat from an LBS that has a really nice 30 day swap policy, and, has 5-8 seats for you to *try* out on your bike right there is a big plus!

    I ended up getting a Cloud-9 seat. It's super comfortable for the first 10-15 miles (multiple days in a row too) - but, after bout 30 miles I find myself shifting around a fair bit, and then not comfortable on it the very next day (but fine the day after that).

    Again - am not an expert - but simply going to a LBS set up to let you try some out - will help you greatly. When I got mine, Sam had 5-8 seats already mounted on seat posts, so he would put one on my bike, I would ride a bit, then he'd put another on, rinse and repeat.

    Again, welcome
    Saddles have three problems:

    One: Is that as you lose weight your position on the bicycle changes so a saddle that is good at one weight, may not be at another weight,
    Two: As you lose weight there is less, um, padding between the saddle and the nerves, so a less then ideal saddle will start to show it's deficiencies.
    Three: As you lose weight you tend to ride farther and you run into one of those points where a less then ideal saddle will start to show it's deficiencies.

    I think, Peter_C you may have run into one of these with the Cloud 9, so maybe you need to graduate from that saddle to a different one. You might want to check all aspects of bicycle fit, realizing you will probably do so a couple of more times on the way down. Fit and position can change so much that you may need a different bicycle.

    Kgowan, you may find you need that type of saddle, even though it will not be ideal at a lower weight, is ideal at your current weight. Peter has the right idea though, you may need to find an LBS with either some demo saddles or who will let you return a saddle that isn't right. Even 98lb riders sometimes go through a number of saddles before finding the right one.

  11. #11
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dscheidt View Post
    the saddle needs ot be wide enough to support the ischial tuberosities (the "sit bones") in the normal riding position. If it's not, you're sitting on soft tissue. That's painful, and can cause nerve damage. No reason to put up with that, just for the sake of being stupid.

    Two months is an awfully long time to put up with a poorly fitting saddle.
    That should have pointed at me, not canopus.

    The OP just got a bicycle, went on a ride or two and his butt hurts. His butt will hurt on any saddle at this point no matter how big or small it is. He needs to get used to sitting on a bike seat again, hence the two month quota which is a reasonable time for a new rider to rack up 150-200 miles. If after that time period it is still painful, then pursue a new saddle. IMHO, he would be throwing money away as what he buys now will most likly be wrong.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Fat Tire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kgowen View Post
    Hi all,
    Any good ideas for a good big butt seat? A friend of mine just got a cloud 9 type seat and will be trying it out. Any seat suggestions?
    http://www.amazon.com/Large-Sofa-Gel...=1EYG4CSQPEI92

    This is advertised as the largest seat made, by Sunlite/Cloud Nine, it comes with gel and springs, too, and that may help a bit. At 325 lbs, I am a connoisseur of CHEAP SEATS. This one is $36. Velo, Sunlite/Cloud 9, Avenir and Planet Bike are good (mostly because they use seats made by Velo) better than you might expect for the money. Turn it over and look at the bottom, probably says Velo.
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