Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-16-10, 11:15 PM   #1
daryn
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Looking for advice on a new bike

Hey, all. I originally came here after surfing the net for a while looking at sites to build bikes. Then the weight factor came into play and I realized I need to do more research before making a purchase. I weigh in at 220 lbs and stand at 5'10". I'm a big, broad-shouldered dude who works out every week and I'm looking to get into biking as a way to build muscle, trim off a little and have fun.

I used to dirt jump on an old Mongoose years ago and for a while I've been itching to get a road bike of some sort, since I have an asphalt bike path near my house that goes all through Florida. I'm big on speed. I like to go fast and see how long I can endure and I've got the leg power to do it. I was toying around building bikes on Mission Bicycle and I like what they have to offer but I couldn't find anything regarding weight limits, etc. I'm sure their support crew could help me out but I wanted to consult some long-time riders to see what else is out there. Plus a lot of the new parts and brands these days are foreign to me, so it's hard to determine which ones to trust and which to avoid.

What do you recommend? I'm willing to spend up to $800 or so, or maybe even more depending on what's available. I'm sure it's much easier for you smaller people out there, but us Clydesdales and Athenas have our work cut out for us. I'd hate to buy the wrong thing and have a wheel taco on the first day or something.

Thanks in advance for any advice you guys and ladies can provide.

Last edited by daryn; 06-16-10 at 11:18 PM. Reason: typo
daryn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-10, 11:36 PM   #2
TrojanHorse 
SuperGimp
 
TrojanHorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Whittier, CA
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 11,190
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Well, I don't think 220 requires much in the way of special consideration honestly... you should be fine on most road bikes.

Get decent wheels... 32 spoke or more, hand built is preferable.

Go dredge up some ideas and come back for specific recommendations but enjoy!
TrojanHorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-10, 11:59 PM   #3
daryn
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for your input, TrojanHorse. I've been reading a lot of stuff and it seems like you're pretty in line with what I've seen elsewhere. It seems like the biggest factors are rims and wheels. I've always had pretty high metabolism so I know once I get into the habit of riding every day or every other day, I'll probably be down to ~180 in no time.
daryn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-10, 08:02 AM   #4
TrojanHorse 
SuperGimp
 
TrojanHorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Whittier, CA
Bikes: Specialized Roubaix
Posts: 11,190
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Oh, so you're just a Clyde-poseur... nice.
TrojanHorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-10, 08:13 AM   #5
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,983
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 180 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by daryn View Post
Thanks for your input, TrojanHorse. I've been reading a lot of stuff and it seems like you're pretty in line with what I've seen elsewhere. It seems like the biggest factors are rims and wheels. I've always had pretty high metabolism so I know once I get into the habit of riding every day or every other day, I'll probably be down to ~180 in no time.
A Jamis Ventura Sport at $675 should fit the bill nicely. It's a pig compared to today's Unobtainium bikes but 15 years ago, this would have been a world class weight. Even today a 22 lb bike is nothing to sneeze at.
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-10, 08:47 AM   #6
daryn
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
Oh, so you're just a Clyde-poseur... nice.
Haha, yeah I guess I am then. We'll see how it goes

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
A Jamis Ventura Sport at $675 should fit the bill nicely. It's a pig compared to today's Unobtainium bikes but 15 years ago, this would have been a world class weight. Even today a 22 lb bike is nothing to sneeze at.
That looks like a solid starter bike. It is on the heavy side like you said but I don't think I'm gonna be entering triathlons any time soon. I've put miles in on bikes that were around the same weight without a problem. I like the Ventura Comp also. Definitely adding these to my list of considerations.

Thanks for your suggestion.
daryn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-10, 10:52 AM   #7
CACycling
Senior Member
 
CACycling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Bikes: '08 Fuji Roubaix RC; '07 Schwinn Le Tour GS; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX
Posts: 4,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm a bit heavier than you and have low spoke count wheels on my commuter and road bike. Commuter snapped a couple of NDS leading spokes at the threads early on but once those were replaced it has been solid and I put it through a lot with potholes and railroad tracks as daily fare. Road bike has been bulletproof with only very minor truing required every 1K miles or so.

At your weight, build quality is key. A quality, well-made, low spoke count wheel is superior to a poorly-made 36 spoke wheel. I'd find a road bike that fits you well and is in your price range (look for leftovers as you can sometimes save big) then ride the stock wheels until they give you problems.

My wife and I have Fujis. Both are Ultegra-equipped, have Al frames w' CF seat stays, forks and seat posts. Hers is a Finest 1.0 ($1,600+ list / paid < $900) and mine is a Roubaix RC ($1,800+ list / paid < $1,000). My commuter is a Schwinn Le Tour GS Sora/Tiagra-equipped bike ($750 list / paid $500) and although a bit heavy rides pretty nicely. With some carefull shopping, $800 can get you a lot of bike.
CACycling is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:07 PM.