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  1. #1
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    Clydesdale forks?

    I have an old Gary Fisher (hand welded) with Mantou SX forks that are way to soft for my 300 lbs.

    what current/recent forks work well for us?

    Thought about a newer bike, but seems that to get a decent fork/bike I would have to spend $1000 I don't have... at this time $800 is a little steep.

    It seems most forks do not have the option of stiffer springs..???

    Sat on Specialized RockHopper and Hardrock, but the forks collapsed 50% just sitting on them. I Like the 29, but same thing with forks.

    I do not plan to ride rough trails- mainly street for exercise and dirt roads.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drmajor View Post
    I have an old Gary Fisher (hand welded) with Mantou SX forks that are way to soft for my 300 lbs.

    what current/recent forks work well for us?

    Thought about a newer bike, but seems that to get a decent fork/bike I would have to spend $1000 I don't have... at this time $800 is a little steep.

    It seems most forks do not have the option of stiffer springs..???

    Sat on Specialized RockHopper and Hardrock, but the forks collapsed 50% just sitting on them. I Like the 29, but same thing with forks.

    I do not plan to ride rough trails- mainly street for exercise and dirt roads.
    Probably the best is a suspension corrected solid fork, you need to measure from the fork crown the "shoulder" at the top of the crown, to the dropouts, and get one that is the same length. Otherwise the only forks that work are some of the high pressure air forks, and yeah they are pricey, and may be too tall for your GF....

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bluetrane2028's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with a rigid. If the funds are tight when my existing fork goes, that's what I'll be getting for sure. If you decide on a rigid fork, get a steel one. It'll bend a bit to take some of the edge off, and will go through just about anything before breaking.

  4. #4
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    big guy forks

    suggestions on rigid forks?

    I have sites on a RoxShox 302 with lock out @$179... don't know if it will be stiff enough or can a stiffer spring be installed?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bluetrane2028's Avatar
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    I was thinking more like this:

    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...ls.php?id=4122

    $53 without disc mounts, $67 with disc mounts.

  6. #6
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    I prefer to ride rigid since I do not ride much dirt. I went with a Surly 1x1 fork when my cheap suspension fork went out on my Trek 3700.

    http://surlybikes.com/parts/category/forks/

  7. #7
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    The fork doesn't support your weight, they all will dip when you lean forward and put weight on them.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Arent forks always the problem? I mean forks are why were all clydes... and spoons, and knives.

  9. #9
    The Left Coast, USA FrenchFit's Avatar
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    ???? Just get a susp fork with a decent lock-out. I'm probably 210, I've bashed my front fork pretty hard while locked out, with loads, and I don't think I've defeated it on either my Rock Shox or RST.

  10. #10
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    forks

    OK,
    based on budget and suggestions- I bought the Surley 1x1 forks @$54. I just don't have $600 for a fairly good suspension fork. And I can't seem to find out what forks can be updated with heavier springs.

    OK- it's not suspension. Defiantly more vibration/shock. The wrist sure feel it more.

    So, I reduced the air pressure in the front tire - from 55 psi to about 47. That helps. I am thinking about trying to find a city tire with soft side walls to help more. i typically only ride on pavement, in grass and sandy roads. So big knobs are not needed..... some grip is good though.

    Handling..... Much better! Wow, now that the old suspension isn't collapsing when I turn, the bike is much more responsive and steering is more accurate.

  11. #11
    Senior Member breadbin's Avatar
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    yeah i prefer the rigid forks anyday and you might feel more shock and vibration but should get used to it over time i think. its only cos you were used to the shocks before not sure if i'd reduce the pressure cos you might be more prone to punctures and plus it would be harder to cycle with a softer wheel. i'd definitely recommend a pair of mtb slicks though they are amazing!! i got a pair of 1.5" slicks and the difference is just extraordinary
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  12. #12
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    Went with the Surley 1x1 rigid. I run about 5 psi lower in front tire (1.75") to soften the ride some. it handles so much better than soft forks. Fun to ride. $53 at Jensonusa.com

  13. #13
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    get some slicks on that bad boy and buy another set of wheels that you can mount your knobbies on and switch back and forth as needed.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drmajor View Post
    OK- it's not suspension. Defiantly more vibration/shock. The wrist sure feel it more.

    So, I reduced the air pressure in the front tire - from 55 psi to about 47. That helps. I am thinking about trying to find a city tire with soft side walls to help more. i typically only ride on pavement, in grass and sandy roads. So big knobs are not needed..... some grip is good though.
    Get slick tires, then, which will help with handling, braking, and speed, although not terribly much for the last one.

    Do you have padded gloves?

    Mountain bikes usually only have one real hand position, and the bar grips I've had were never anywhere near as comfy as good road bike handlebar tape. You might see if something like this can be had for flat bars?
    Don't believe everything you think.

  15. #15
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    +1 on the Surly 1x1 fork. I replaced my blown out suspension fork on my
    Trek 3700 with a rigid instead of getting a new suspension fork. Since I
    ride mostly MUPs, it was not a problem. I love the cheap fork and dropped a
    couple of pounds off of the bike.

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