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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 10-21-10, 05:48 PM   #1
Peter_C
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I'd like input please?

As I do not wish to cross-post, please follow this LINK to a thread I posted in the recumbent section.

Here's your chance as I am asking for input, thoughts, etc?

Thanks...
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Old 10-21-10, 11:18 PM   #2
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Hmmm, if you really like the idea of a 'bent, then go for it. I think it is more of a style preference than anything cuz I am not so sure that your butt wouldn't get used to the saddle of a normal bike in time.

Like most of us on this corner of the forums, I'm not a small guy, and I have a saddle that is really quite small. It took me a couple weeks to get used to it, and now I never give it a thought.

As for the knees, have you tried riding with clip-in peddles/shoes with cleats? I find that even though this is generally only seen on road racing type bikes, they are actually very good for knees. With normal peddles that you just stand on and wear normal shoes, you only have the downward direction to push, but when you are clipped in, you have 4 directions with which to exert pressure to get those wheels moving! I find that the knees are less involved with the other 3 directions then the normal downward one too. (Although the muscles still need to be built up over time to cope with extended periods of exerting pressure in those directions!)
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Old 10-22-10, 12:09 AM   #3
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As for the knees, have you tried riding with clip-in peddles/shoes with cleats? I find that even though this is generally only seen on road racing type bikes, they are actually very good for knees.
+1. I've been using toe clips ( cages ) for ten years. One day this spring, I went for a long ride, and my left knee was on fire when I got home - one particular spot on the outside corner. Seems like I was slipping a little bit, or had my foot angled wrong, or something, and was pedaling in an oval instead of a circle. Clipless ( aka clip-in ) pedals cured this.

My local bike shop is great with saddles. I didn't like the one that came with my new bike, so I bought another one from them. But a fitter told me it wasn't right for me, so the shop took it back for a full refund, and loaned me another saddle for a week and a half. I was pretty happy with it, but they suggested another, similar one, and I ultimately wound up on a saddle I like a lot, but also felt like it was an informed choice. Not all bike shops will do this, but I hear one of the big online ones ( competitive cyclist, maybe? ) has a demo/loaner program like this.

I've been a pretty recalcitrant case in terms of not being able to be comfortable on a bike, and I thought I may have made a big mistake in getting my road bike instead of a 'bent. Turns out to be a muscle imbalance in my shoulders, I'm learning to fix it, and ultimately I'm really happy with the bike I have.
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Old 10-22-10, 06:50 AM   #4
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If you like one, get one.

But your stated reasons to get one don't impress me. There's more than a whiff of 'magic pill' about them. Your saddle hurts you because it's a comfort saddle designed for short rides and you are doing longer rides with it. You could try another saddle. "Nah, go for the 'bent!"
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Old 10-23-10, 06:36 AM   #5
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Peter, you have a lot of fear of "starting all over again" you don't need a new bike, your butt is simply deconditioned. Go reread some of your old posts; you lusted about your suede! Getting your ass conditioned is a 3 week proposition. It will be there before you know it.
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Old 10-23-10, 06:45 AM   #6
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As I stated on the other thread, ride one, and not for just a little bit, take a good several mile test ride. When I first got my bent I found the range of motion that I was putting my knees trough a bit uncomfortable. It would be sad if you bought a bent, rode it a couple days and Frank swelled up to the size of a watermellon. Again, I'm not sure why it seemed my knees were bending more than on a traditional bike, maybe it was just the added effort to keep my feet up on the pedals in the recumbent position. You are welcome to drive over on a nice weekend and ride mine.
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Old 10-23-10, 07:02 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Peter_C View Post
As I do not wish to cross-post, please follow this LINK to a thread I posted in the recumbent section.

Here's your chance as I am asking for input, thoughts, etc?

Thanks...
I've never had a bent, might get one some day, when I am old and decrepit and need a 3 wheeler.

I think we spoke before about saddles, some are good for 3 miles, some are good for 30 and some are good for 300. This is individual, in that a saddle good for rider A for 300 miles may only be good for rider B for 3 miles. Bents are expensive, you can test a lot of saddles for the price of a 'bent. Now several of us here, told you that when you had your shoulder surgery you should obtain a trainer, and ride that while off the road. You didn't, and now you have to pay for that, with reconditioning yourself.
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Old 10-23-10, 09:32 AM   #8
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Peter...I can be off my road bike for a week and feel it in my butt when I get back on. It is a conditioning thing. Same thing with the hands, neck, shoulder. There isnt a "magic pill" that will allow you to be off the bike for a while and then ride without any inital discomfort.

My thoughts are that the pedal forward designs are not made for long distance riding. To me, a regular design bike place some weight on the pedals, some on the seat and some on the handlebars. With your design, it is placing all the weight on the seat. From past postings of your bike, it had a wide "cushy" seat. Those are bad for the long haul. The cushy seats carry the weight in places other than the sit bones, hence the discomfort.

Put a more conventional "hard" saddle on there and get your butt used to it again. Or get a bike that is more conventional like this http://bit.ly/cdjfot

You asked for opinions, that is mine!
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Old 10-24-10, 09:05 AM   #9
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Got over 200,000 miles on road bikes over the years, riding about 5,000 a year. Twelve years ago I finally got tired of sore neck muscles, sore butt ( I had customer frames, and dozens of saddles over the years), looking down at the pavement half the time when riding to rest my neck and back, standing up on the pedals to give my butt a break, riding no hands to rest my back muscles, wiggling fingers to get rid of the numbness, etc..etc.... and I bought a recumbent trike. Now I easily ride twice the distance I used to with ease and am totally comfortable. When making the choice between comfort, and uncomfortable, I pick the former.

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Old 10-24-10, 09:12 AM   #10
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Got over 200,000 miles on road bikes over the years, riding about 5,000 a year. Twelve years ago I finally got tired of sore neck muscles, sore butt ( I had customer frames, and dozens of saddles over the years), looking down at the pavement half the time when riding to rest my neck and back, standing up on the pedals to give my butt a break, riding no hands to rest my back muscles, wiggling fingers to get rid of the numbness, etc..etc.... and I bought a recumbent trike. Now I easily ride twice the distance I used to with ease and am totally comfortable. When making the choice between comfort, and uncomfortable, I pick the former.
+1

I like my Trek 7200, but I LOVE my recumbent trike!
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Old 11-26-10, 01:56 AM   #11
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I've never had a bent, might get one some day, when I am old and decrepit and need a 3 wheeler.

I think we spoke before about saddles, some are good for 3 miles, some are good for 30 and some are good for 300. This is individual, in that a saddle good for rider A for 300 miles may only be good for rider B for 3 miles. Bents are expensive, you can test a lot of saddles for the price of a 'bent. Now several of us here, told you that when you had your shoulder surgery you should obtain a trainer, and ride that while off the road. You didn't, and now you have to pay for that, with reconditioning yourself.
Mr. Wogsterca, I don't find smug or finger wagging helpful...not even interesting reading.
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