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  1. #26
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    Can you link where it says that? I'm not concerned so much with the limit but more that the LBS told me there wasn't one.

  2. #27
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    http://cdn.specialized.com/OA_MEDIA/...10_AppA_r2.pdf

    The 2011 literature does not seem to be on their website yet.
    This is found under 'Support' in 'Warranty, Manuals & Tech'

  3. #28
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
    Specialized lists 300 lbs as the weight limit (rider + 55lbs cargo not to exceed 300 lbs). So you are exceeding it by a bit already... Although a company is not going to maufacture something with a 300lb weight limit so that if you sit 301 lbs on it it will collapse... there is a 'safety factor' built in, but we don't know what that safety factor is... the safety factor is really to keep the manufacturer safe from being sued. Are you within the safety factor? Almost definitely?

    Definitely? Almost.

    All that being said, the weight limit is the same for the bikes with aluminum, steel and carbon forks. Due to the nature of carbon I would be inclined to believe a new, undamaged carbon fork is stronger, not weaker, than the aluminum forks.

    But that is just my opinion. I think either way you are buying a bike for which you exceed the weight limit and you have to take a leap of faith, ride carefully, and occaisionally check the bike (especially carbon parts) for any sign of damage.

    edit:

    And accept the responsibility that if the bike does fail (which really is very unlikely under normal riding conditions) you took that risk on yourself with full knowledge the bike has a weight limit of 300 lbs.
    Most weight limits, whether they be for a bicycle or just about any other device is a lawyer limit, not an engineer limit. The design of a new manufactured bicycle frame is done by engineers who have a lot of things in mind including a weight limit, that they design for. Next it gets interesting, marketing wants a high limit, because it makes the user think of strength and durability, legal wants a low limit, because the lawyers want huge retainers for doing nothing, law suits mean they need to do work, over loaded and broken frames or forks mean law suits. Usually the published weight limit is somewhere below the design limit. If the published limit is 300lbs, the design limit is somewhere beyond that, whether it's 301lbs or 600lbs, we do not know.

    Now there is one thing, if you see warnings and stickers on the bicycle, in the manual, on the website and everywhere else stating that weight limit, it's probably closer then if it is generally understood, but not published anywhere.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wogsterca View Post
    Most weight limits, whether they be for a bicycle or just about any other device is a lawyer limit, not an engineer limit. The design of a new manufactured bicycle frame is done by engineers who have a lot of things in mind including a weight limit, that they design for. Next it gets interesting, marketing wants a high limit, because it makes the user think of strength and durability, legal wants a low limit, because the lawyers want huge retainers for doing nothing, law suits mean they need to do work, over loaded and broken frames or forks mean law suits. Usually the published weight limit is somewhere below the design limit. If the published limit is 300lbs, the design limit is somewhere beyond that, whether it's 301lbs or 600lbs, we do not know.

    Now there is one thing, if you see warnings and stickers on the bicycle, in the manual, on the website and everywhere else stating that weight limit, it's probably closer then if it is generally understood, but not published anywhere.
    Sorry if this is redundant, but here are some further thoughts for the OP:

    I am more familiar with the design of pressure vessels. Most of the examples I work with are designed, built, and operated by the same organization so lawsuits are rare. But they still have to be licensed by a regulatory body. What is signifigant about piping systems for pressure vessels is that they have two published limits - an 'operating limit' and a 'design limit.' THe operating limit is lower than the design limit. THe operating limit is also the value adhered to by the people operating the system, but the engineering limit is the limit that we 'know' the system can withstand, and the limit above which the 'safety factor' is included.

    If we were to apply the same design practice to bike design, we would assume the weight limit published by specialized is the 'operating limit' and that the bike is actually designed to some higher 'design limit,' and there is a safety factor above that. But this would be an assumption. I don't think it is a bad assumption, but it is an assumption.
    Also note that the chart published by Specialized has examples of what constitutes 'safe' use, and for loads above safe use it only says "use at your own risk" - it does not say "exceeding this limit by a small amount will result in immediate failure."

    I am quite sure nobody at Specialized would ever admit to this or give out what the actual structural limit is, or say that it is OK for Jefffred05 to ride the bike. It is up to Jefffred05 to make assumptions based on the best available evidence for his decision, and to take a calculated risk and be responsible for the consequences.

    The consequences for this risk might be: having a frame fail underneath him while riding in traffic and winding up dead or crippled under a bus, or it might be years of trouble free riding with a wide grin on his face. If I were 360 lbs I would take the risk and get a good sturdy hybrid like the Sirrus or 7.3 (provided, when asked, Trek does not say the weight limit is 175 lbs) and ride without a care in the world.

  5. #30
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    Great points. Do I need to worry about a carbon fork? or should i go with the alum. one?

  6. #31
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    I would look at the absence of a carbon fork, a definite plus. Especially for a big guy!

    If you do nick or scratch that fork, think of the stresses that would be on that stress concentrator...... MHO

    If you deal with pressure vessels - the stresses are the same!

    A few more things that should be seriously considered - ask for 36 spoke, properly tensioned back wheel, the widest tires that can be fit to the rims and frame, and a wheel check and retension after a few weeks of riding.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


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  7. #32
    Senior Member jr59's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jefffred05 View Post
    Does anyone know which bike has the best shifting/gear components?

    It seems like the specialized has a bit of a one up on the trek with the "FACT carbon/alloy fork with Zertz inserts for a quick, responsive road feel and forgiving ride; rack/fender mounts for versatility," but... i dunno.

    I shouldn't have any problems with the carbon fork in regards to weight right?

    Going crazy, please advise!

    Both bikes are about the same;

    IMO, I stay away from carbon, it adds one more thing for me to worry about.

    I'm 6'4 and 265, down from 295. I rode a FX for a whille and loved it.
    I sold it to get my Cross Check, wish I wouldn't have done it.
    Nothing wrong with the CC, but, looking back, I should have kept the FX.

    As far as dics brakes goes, unless you are ridding in very wet conditions, again IMO are a waste of $$.
    The canti's will stop you good enough.

    Both bikes will shift very well and last a long time, with care.

    If all things are equal, buy the shop. Ask around, get some ideas about each shop and decide which one makes you feel good.
    Gravity hates us all, but it hates me more than thin people!

  8. #33
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    First off, a BIG THANK YOU to everyone who help guide me. You all have help me swim through a sea of data in the multipule noob posts I've made.

    After talking with one of the mechanics in the back, he recomended going with the carbon fork. He stated that weight isn't an issue when it comes to the fork/frame that im looking at. However, with my weight and the type of bike im looking at, the carbon w/ vibration tech will make it a much better ride. (carbon was the cheaper bike as well)

    So, with that said, I went with the Sirrus Elite. They wouldn't have an 7.3 in stock at the other shop until tuesday plus I liked the sirrus shop a bit more (larger selection of stuff w/ big guy sizes) after riding the treks and specializeds more I found the sirrus to be inbetween the treks 22.5 and 25 inch bikes which is the perfect size for me.


    Thanks again!

  9. #34
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    in my opinion the rapid is the best because it is the closest to a true road bike in terms of its components. Less need to upgrade down the road, however, it doesn't have a carbon fork. with that said, when i got my rapid its not like I was sitting there saying "man, I need a carbon fork" half of it is marketing hype. he stock kenda tires that come on a rapid will not work for you. Period. End of Discussion. I am 235 and they did not work for me. Mltiple problems. Good news is the rapid can easily fit tires as large as 35c. i bet the lbs would swap them for free for you. I bought some 35c for mine just to be able to ride onsome dirt paths and the tires were only 20 bucks each, about the same cost as the stock ones. so you can get the rapid for $75 less which will cover your helmet and a set of riding gloves.

    I can't explain why, but I don't like cantilever brakes. I think its really just the look of them but I don't like them. The rapid has caliper brakes like any other road bike and they are long reach so fitting big tires is a non issue. but ultimately all these bikes are pretty similar and you really can't go wrong with any of them.

  10. #35
    Senior Member TinyBear's Avatar
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    Congrats on the new bike have fun out there.
    My Bicycles: Giant Boulder SE, Giant Seek 1
    My cheater bike: 2010 Honda CBF600SA

  11. #36
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Congrats on your new bike! I hope you two have many happy miles together. Don't forget to pick up all the extras: floor pump with a presta head, tubes, seat pack, flat repair kit, multi tool, tire levers, frame pump, water bottles, cages etc.

  12. #37
    Senior Member chuben's Avatar
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    Congrats on the purchase and hope you enjoy yours as much as I enjoy my Sirrus

  13. #38
    Getting a clue engstrom's Avatar
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    Jefffred05,

    just remember it's official bike forum rules that when you get a new (new to you) bike you have to post pictures of the bike. The standard picture is of the right side (drive side) with the bike leaning against a white garage door and the cranks turned to be in line with the down tube or the seat tube. Extra points if you rotate the wheels so that the valve stems are hidden behind the fork in the front and the chainstay in the rear.

    Oh, and congrats on the new bike! Have fun riding it - fun while riding will lead to more frequent and longer ride in the long term which will help weight loss. So don't push yourself too much at the beginning unless you're still having fun.

  14. #39
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    I have a trek 7.3 with discs, flat wore it out. Went from 315 # to 205#. The only issues I had was a few broken spokes from potholed NY roads. I have since bought 2 higher end road bikes, hardly used, deeply discounted, craigslist is your friend, but still use the trek on rainy days.
    I found that I am not that sensitive to size, and adjusted the seatpost and stem to fit. I usually only go 20 - 30 miles at a clip though, not all day rides.
    Enjoy it!

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