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  1. #1
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    Which one? - Trek FX vs Specialized Sirrus

    Howdy,

    I'm 6'4 and 365 pounds. I'm haven't touched a bike since I was 12 and am looking to get back into it for weight loss. Biking will be my primary/almost only cardio. I've gotten some great advice on the basics of what I need and have narrowed it down to two bikes.

    Trek FX 7.3 2010 for 599.99 or Specialized Sirrus Elite 2011 for 625. The trek doesn't have handlebar bar ends which run around $25 (which I will add if I go with the trek) so the price difference is a mute point.

    I was also told that the trek fx 7.3 had no changes between 2010 and 2011. Can anyone confirm this?




    Heres the stats on the two bikes.

    Trek 7.3 2010

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/road/fx/73fx/

    Frameset
    Sizes 15, 17.5, 20, 22.5, 25"
    Frame FX Alpha Black Aluminum
    Fork FX Alloy w/tapered wall thickness, straight blades, Clix dropouts
    Wheels
    Wheels Alloy front hub, Shimano RM30 rear hub; Bontrager Nebula 32-hole alloy rims
    Tires Bontrager Race All Weather Hard-Case, 700x32c
    Drivetrain
    Shifters Shimano EF60, 8-speed trigger
    Front Derailleur Shimano M191
    Rear Derailleur Shimano Deore
    Crank Shimano M361, 48/38/28 w/chainguard
    Cassette SRAM PG-830 11-32, 8 speed
    Pedals Nylon body w/alloy cage
    Components
    Saddle Bontrager H1
    Seat Post Bontrager Nebula
    Handlebars Bontrager Satellite Plus IsoZone OS, 25mm rise
    Stem Bontrager SSR, 10 degree
    Headset Slimstak, semi-cartridge bearings, sealed
    Brakeset Avid SD-3 brakes w/Shimano EF60 levers





    Specialized Sirrus 2011

    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...port%2FFitness

    FRAMESpecialized A1 Premium aluminum, fully manipulated tubing, smooth weld compact design, internal cable routing , integrated headset,fender and rack eyelets
    REAR SHOCKFORKSpecialized FACT carbon legs, aluminum crown & steerer, fender eyelets
    HEADSET1-1/8" sealed Cr-Mo bearings integrated w/ headset, 20mm alloy cone spacer with 20mm of spacers
    STEMSpecialized Elite-Set, 3D forged alloy, 4-position adjustable, 4-bolt 31.8mm clamp
    HANDLEBARSSpecialized Sirrus Elite, 6061 aluminum, small riser, 31.8mm
    TAPEBody Geometry locking Comfort Grips open-end with plug, alloy barend
    FRONT BRAKEForged 6061 aluminum, 85mm linear pull w/ cartridge pads
    REAR BRAKEForged 6061 aluminum, 85mm linear pull w/ cartridge pads
    BRAKE LEVERSShimano EF-51 integrated w/ shifter
    FRONT DERAILLEURShimano Altus
    REAR DERAILLEURShimano Deore
    SHIFT LEVERSShimano EF-51, EZ Fire
    CASSETTEShimano HG-40, 8-speed, 11-32t
    CHAINKMC Z-51
    CRANKSETShimano FCM171
    CHAINRINGS48 x 38 x 28T w/ chainguard
    BOTTOM BRACKETSealed cartridge, square taper, 68mm
    PEDALSComposite flat pedal
    FRONT WHEELREAR WHEELRIMSAlex AS-14, double wall
    FRONT HUBForged aluminum, sealed bearing, QR, 32h
    REAR HUBForged alloy, double-sealed, cassette, QR, 32h
    SPOKESStainless 14g
    FRONT TIRESpecialized All Condition Sport, 700x32c, wire bead, 60TPI, w/ Flak Jacket protection
    REAR TIRESpecialized All Condition Sport, 700x32c, wire bead, 60TPI, w/ Flak Jacket protection
    INNER TUBESStandard presta valve
    SADDLEBody Geometry Riva Road, 155mm width
    SEATPOSTSpecialized Sport, alloy, two-bolt clamp, 27.2mm
    SEAT BINDERAlloy, 31.8mm
    NOTESChain stay protector, chain catcher, clips and straps, derailleur hanger, clear coat, owners manual


    There is also a disc brake version of the Sirrus elite for $60 or so more, but there is a rim change and a fork change. I couldn't find any info about the rims on it so i don't know if they are double walled or not. I am willing to spend the money if it is worth it, I'm just not sure. If anyone is familiar, please advise.
    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...port%2FFitness

    FORK
    Specialized alloy, w/ disc mount
    RIMS
    Jalco SDX200 disc, 32h
    FRONT HUB
    CNC alloy, high-low flange, QR, 32h

    REAR HUB
    CNC alloy, double-sealed, cassette, QR, 32h

    Those were the main differences I found other than the braking.

    Both shops offer the usual. 1 year adjustments etc and both will give 10-15% off accessories. Should I get my accessories from them or is there a go to site for helms, water bottle holders, computers, etc?

    Also I will be buying my wife a new bike that is a step or two down from mine once I choose which one to go with.

    Thanks for all the help guys and gals! I cant wait to get on the saddle! (Bike shorts are in the mail!)

  2. #2
    Senior Member magohn's Avatar
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    Just a personal preference but I would go with the Specialized. I have had good experiences with the company and the quality of their bikes.

    I would also go for the disc brakes if you can - I have disc on a MTB and even at 288lbs, the bkie will stop on a dime. Today's disc brakes are extremely powerful.

    HTH, magohn

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by magohn View Post
    Just a personal preference but I would go with the Specialized. I have had good experiences with the company and the quality of their bikes.

    I would also go for the disc brakes if you can - I have disc on a MTB and even at 288lbs, the bkie will stop on a dime. Today's disc brakes are extremely powerful.

    HTH, magohn
    Do you know anything about the Jalco SDX200 disc, 32h rim? I tried to google it but I couldn't find any info. If it isn't doublewalled its a no go. Also its $60 more and I loose the carbon fork plus their vibration tech... is it worth it?

  4. #4
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    I also liked the Giant Rabid 3. It was about the same price. I didnt list it at first since i was concerned about the 28c wheels. However, I loved how it rode (all 3 road about the same) so I figured I would throw it up as well. I was advised to go with at least a 32c tire from a different thread. Can I go with a 28 or should I play it safe with 32 and above?

    P.S. I'm equal between all 3 and all shops.


    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-US/....3/7298/44052/
    SizesS, M, L, XLColorsSilver/Black/WhiteFrameALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum ForkCroMo, OverDrive Steerer ShockN / AComponents

    HandlebarGiant Sport, Flat 31.8StemAlloy, Adjustable HeightSeatpostGiant Sport, 30.9SaddleGiant Performance Road, Men'sPedalsCaged w/ ClipsDrivetrain

    ShiftersShimano R221, EZ FireFront DerailleurShimano R443Rear DerailleurShimano 2300BrakesTektro R358, Alloy Dual PivotBrake LeversTektro AlloyCassetteSRAM PG 830 11x28, 8-SpeedChainKMC Z72CranksetFSA Tempo, 30/42/52Bottom BracketFSA CartridgeWheels

    RimsGiant S-R2Hubs[F] Formula Sealed, [R] Shimano 2200, 32hSpokesStainless Steel, 14gTiresGiant P-R3, 60 tpi, Flat Guard, [F] & [R] Specific, 700x28 Other

    ExtrasAlloy Bar EndsWeightHow much does this bike weigh? It’s a common question, and rightly so. But the truth is, there are no industry standards for claiming bike weights—and this leads to a lot of misinformation. Variances exist based on size, frame material, finish and hardware. And as bikes get lighter, these differences become more critical. At Giant, we believe the only way to truly know the weight of any particular bike is to find out for yourself at your local retailer.

  5. #5
    Senior Member TinyBear's Avatar
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    I picked up a Giant Seek 1 for my road going bike. Similar to Treks FX line but i just found it more comfy for me and i kinda liked the hydrulic disc brakes (dont really need em but they kinda cool LOL).
    My Bicycles: Giant Boulder SE, Giant Seek 1
    My cheater bike: 2010 Honda CBF600SA

  6. #6
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    Seek 0 could be an option.

  7. #7
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    I also was torn between the 7.3 and the rapid and ended up with the 7.3, I went over a month trying to decide between the 2 since they felt equal to me and I really liked them both, the decision maker was the deal I got on the trek. All three of the bikes seem just about equal so you really can't go wrong. I would go out and give all three a good test ride before buying to see which one feels like it has the best fit and feel for you, just make sure your testing a bike that is the correct size for you or you won't get the real feel of the bike. Good luck

    P.S.
    I still think about the rapid, but not while I'm riding my 7.3

  8. #8
    Neil_B
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    I like the Trek, but all three bikes mentioned would be good choices.

  9. #9
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    I'm a big fan of Specialized bicycles and wouldn't hesitate to reccomend the Sirrus, however, the bikes you are comparing are nearly identical. If you don't mind Trek's over use of in-house brand componets (Bontranger) then pick whichever one has the better paint job. Don't exclude the Trek because of the Bonti stuff, just be aware of what it is. Some is better than others. Ride both bikes and buy the one that makes your heart skip a beat...in the good way, not the angina way.

    I have the following to share about your wife's bicycle selection. DON'T GO CHEAP ON HER BIKE. Also, let her pick out the bike she wants, not the one you want for her. A happy life is a happy wife. If she wants a cruiser, get her the cruiser. If she wants a roadie, get a roadie. If you force her onto something she honestly doesn't want then she will be less likly to go for a ride with you.

  10. #10
    Subjectively Insane MilitantPotato's Avatar
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    At 240lbs 28C tires sucked for me. At 285lbs I ran 38C tires at max pressure (90psi) and that was great.
    Narrow tires don't always mean faster. If you're maxing the PSI rating and/or compressing a narrow tire down too much, you'd be more comfortable and have less rolling resistance on a wider tire with less deflection.

    I've an '09 7.3, and I've been pretty happy with it. 36H rims would of been nice though.
    You've got a bike, so you gotta move.

  11. #11
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    The fact there is a 25" frame in the Trek would have me taking a strong second look there... I am your height and I currently have a 24" hybrid frame that feels a little small... larger frames tend to have longer headtubes (the 25" Trek has a 22cm headtube, which is quite long) and this allows you to get your handlebars up higher... not that this is necessarily the 'correct' way to set up your bike, but when a bike is set up for a tall person the seat has to be pretty far out of the frame to achieve proper leg extension and can create a big difference between saddle height and handlebar height... and a lot of people don't like this - especially people who have not ridden much in a long time. If you decide you would like a lower bar that is something you can do later by changing or flipping over the stem, and/or changing the riser to a flat bar.

    But that is basically more to do with the way 'I' fit and like to ride... try a few bikes out and make sure you are comfortable - that is half the battle!

  12. #12
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    I tried out a 22.5 and the 25. The LBS recommended that I go with the 22.5 since I was tea bagging the 25 pretty good. When I asked him about torso length he said that since the handlebars/seat is adjustable it wouldn't make a difference. The 22.5 felt good. The other bikes I looked at I think run at 23, so its about the same. I wear about a 32 inseam pant.

  13. #13
    Subjectively Insane MilitantPotato's Avatar
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    6'4" and the 25 is too big? Wild. Stand-over clearance doesn't mean much, unless you can't actually stand-over the bike.
    The 7.3 is more of a road-bike frame, with a long top tube and all, so long as you can get the bars at a comfortable height with the 22.5 you should be good.
    I'd think you'd be almost too big for a 25" though.

    Also, the saddle has only one ideal position (for a given bike and style of riding,) the only thing that can be changed for comfort are the bars. (This is a topic of debate, like most things cycling and may or may not be the consensus in a few years.)

    Being heavy, you'll get a lot more back and hand problems from your bars being even a little too low. There's ways around it, but none are ideal.

    DO NOT settle on a bike until you've had a chance to ride it for a good amount of time.

    I'm 6'8" and the 25" I have is really small on me. I've 6 inches of seatpost and a 3-4" seat to bar drop. Kills the back and hands on longer rides.
    You've got a bike, so you gotta move.

  14. #14
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    'Teabagging' the top tube is not a problem. When you ride you should be wearing something that holds... errr.... ummm... holds the teabag out of the cup, so to speak. A very common (and imho correct) way to check standover is to stand over the middle of the top tube and see how far you can lift the wheels off the ground - stopping after the top tube is pressed into your crotch, not simply touching. One inch clearance front & rear is adequate.

    If they aren't making the largest frame size for people 6'4", then who are they making it for?

  15. #15
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    Ya, the sales guy had me do that on a hybrid (they didn't have the fx in 25) and it was only about half if not less than an inch. Also the seat had to be all the way down to ride it.

  16. #16
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    Are all the bikes at the same shop? Sometimes it is not about convenience; but about the service if the bikes are relatively similar. I bought a used bike from one shop but bring it to another if it needs servicing I can't handle. The people their are friendlier and I have built up a good relationship with them over the years.
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  17. #17
    Senior Member dbikingman's Avatar
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    I read just recently that Trek bikes have between 250 - 300 weight limit on their frames, depending on the style of the bike. I couldn't find weight limit for specialized except for 250 pounds for their carbon seat posts, handlebars, and handlebar stems. That being said I'm sure many in here have ridden these bikes about that weight with no problem. I would ride the bikes and see which one felt the best and consider the LBS where you buy it.

  18. #18
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    All three shops are about the same. Price, service, warranty, and ride are all about the same. I just don't know much about how the components of each bike stack up to each other.

  19. #19
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    They didn't recommend the 25 because they didn't have one????? One would wonder!!!!!!! Just sayin................

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
    They didn't recommend the 25 because they didn't have one????? One would wonder!!!!!!! Just sayin................
    They didn't have the 7.3 in a 22.5 either. They are transferring one from their store on the other side of the state so I can try it out before buying. (rode the 7.1, want to see how 7.3 shifts) Since they are incurring costs and accepting a 2010 model into their inventory I doubt it was "lets put him on the 22.5 so we can sell a bike quickly!" I could stand flat footed over the 25 but for the most part couldn't lift the bike up.

  21. #21
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    Does anyone know which bike has the best shifting/gear components?

    It seems like the specialized has a bit of a one up on the trek with the "FACT carbon/alloy fork with Zertz inserts for a quick, responsive road feel and forgiving ride; rack/fender mounts for versatility," but... i dunno.

    I shouldn't have any problems with the carbon fork in regards to weight right?

    Going crazy, please advise!
    Last edited by Jefffred05; 10-22-10 at 03:54 PM.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jefffred05 View Post
    Ya, the sales guy had me do that on a hybrid (they didn't have the fx in 25) and it was only about half if not less than an inch. Also the seat had to be all the way down to ride it.
    That does not sound right. If you have extremely short legs for 6'4" - lets say 34"/86cm 'cycling inseam' (this is very short for cycling inseam for a person 6'4" - just roughly measured mine and it is closer to 38") - some formulae will put the saddle at 0.883 X inseam or 30"/ 76cm - about 5" above the top of the frame... subtract the 2" height of the average saddle and the seatpost should still be 3" out of the frame.

    I personally find this formula consistently puts my saddle much too low... so all the assumptions that I made would put your saddle at the lowest possible correct height and it should still be ~ 3" out of the frame.

    Also, if the seat is at the correct height when all the way down, a 22.5" frame will only have the seatpost 2.5" out of the frame... this indicates that a 22.5" frame might also be too big... but that is practically impossible. You may feel better or prefer a smaller frame (lots of tall guys do - usually because it is what they are used to), but a 22.5" frame should be a decent size - definitely not too large.

    A possible reasons for this:
    If you have not ridden a bike for a long time, the correct seat height might feel a little weird, but it is important to get the correct extension (leg almost completely straight but not so high that your hips rock) for maximum efficiency and for the health of your knees - riding with the saddle too low will often cause or exascerbate chondromalacia - irritation of the tissue behind the kneecap that can be very painful and sometimes require surgery to correct. And big guys have got to be very careful with their (our) knees! All I'm saying is, whatever bike you are most comfortable riding is the best bike for you... and make sure you have the saddle at the right height!

  23. #23
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    The 25' I tried wasn't an fx but a hybrid. I'm alright for the sizes, I'm mainly concerned about the components. Such as should I go with the carbon fork or not?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jefffred05 View Post
    Does anyone know which bike has the best shifting/gear components?

    It seems like the specialized has a bit of a one up on the trek with the "FACT carbon/alloy fork with Zertz inserts for a quick, responsive road feel and forgiving ride; rack/fender mounts for versatility," but... i dunno.

    I shouldn't have any problems with the carbon fork in regards to weight right?

    Going crazy, please advise!
    Properly set up there should be virtually no difference between the shifting performance of the two bikes. They both have shimano shifters with deore rear and slightly downgraded front derailleurs. THe Sirrus has a slightly nicer front derailleur, I think, but not quite as nice of a crank as the Trek. But the differences will be extremely small... it is much more likely that human error in setting up the front derailleur will have one or the other misaligned by 1/10 of a degree and that will make more difference than the actual 'quality' or component level of the derailleurs. It really does come down to how carefully the shop sets the bikes up, and how demanding a customer you are.

    Is there any difference at all in which bike is more comfortable?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jefffred05 View Post
    The 25' I tried wasn't an fx but a hybrid. I'm alright for the sizes, I'm mainly concerned about the components. Such as should I go with the carbon fork or not?
    Specialized lists 300 lbs as the weight limit (rider + 55lbs cargo not to exceed 300 lbs). So you are exceeding it by a bit already... Although a company is not going to maufacture something with a 300lb weight limit so that if you sit 301 lbs on it it will collapse... there is a 'safety factor' built in, but we don't know what that safety factor is... the safety factor is really to keep the manufacturer safe from being sued. Are you within the safety factor? Almost definitely?

    Definitely? Almost.

    All that being said, the weight limit is the same for the bikes with aluminum, steel and carbon forks. Due to the nature of carbon I would be inclined to believe a new, undamaged carbon fork is stronger, not weaker, than the aluminum forks.

    But that is just my opinion. I think either way you are buying a bike for which you exceed the weight limit and you have to take a leap of faith, ride carefully, and occaisionally check the bike (especially carbon parts) for any sign of damage.

    edit:

    And accept the responsibility that if the bike does fail (which really is very unlikely under normal riding conditions) you took that risk on yourself with full knowledge the bike has a weight limit of 300 lbs.

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