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  1. #26
    Senior Member
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    Tabriz, You'll notice the 10 lb. weight loss more at the beginning of cycling than you will later on. At the beginning physical condition is usually much less than after around six months and as the physical conditioning improves a 10 lb. weight loss will be less apparent.

    A friend of mine classifies weight loss as "fast shed" and "slow shed". The fast shed is the weight he loses quickly just through exercise, slow shed weight loss also incorporates dieting to lose weight.

    Brad

  2. #27
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabriz View Post
    HI all, New Athena here. Well, an old Athena (48) just newly posting here. I've been riding for about 6 weeks now, trying to improve in distance as well as climbing. I live in a hilly area at 7,000 feet, so I would really like to get comfortable on the climbs. I'm up to 30 miles for a max distance. Saturday I did a 24 mile ride, 12 miles uphill nonstop and then back. It's very hard for me. I had the bright idea to try and lose 10 pounds (I'm 185 now) and see if that would make it easier. If it does I'd be motivated for the next 10, etc.

    So, if I lose 10 pounds at my current weight, do you think I would notice it? Or is that too small a loss to notice?

    Thanks for any input!
    Tabriz
    It depends on the time as well as the weight. For example if you lose 10lbs all at once, you will notice it, say you ride up a hill on a 30lb bike, then repeat on a 20lb bike, you will notice it. If however you lose 1lb a week for 10 weeks, then it's going to be much harder to notice. Partly because it's gradual and partly because your fitness level improves if your riding regularly and you might attribute the improvement in performance largely to the fitness improvement. 24 miles with 12 of it being uphill is pretty good at the 6 week mark....

  3. #28
    Senior Member
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    Sep 2009
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    Winter Garden, FL
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    10 pounds is like 2 bags of baking flour. Pick them up the next time you're in the grocery store. It makes a difference

  4. #29
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    [QUOTE=chipcom;11716590]Not much improvement to get from the bike there...I wanted to make sure you weren't using a MTB with suspension fork and knobbies.

    LOL!! I'd be a MONSTER if I could ride my heavy old mountain bike up that hill! That's probably what I should be doing, think of all the exercise I'd get. On second thought, considering how I feel doing it on my light road bike, I think I would just die.

  5. #30
    Senior Member
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    [QUOTE=dbikingman;11717482]Everyone is pulling your leg. It won't get easier....you will only go faster

    NO! Don't tell me that!

  6. #31
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2008
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    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    Contradicting yourself. If you have to shift to a lower gear, you're noticing a difference.
    You could be right! Unless, of course, you've forgotten to take cadence into account... The tricky thing about cadence is that it allows you to spin the pedals at a different rate, yet still produce the same amount of power (on average) and maintain the same average speed despite being in a different gear. Who knew?

    In any event, you can continue to think what you want. I've got real-world data from a PowerTap power meter and the heavily researched Kreuzotter equations on my side, but don't let that stop you from thinking that 10lbs makes a difference for me

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