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  1. #1
    Rain, rain go away john423's Avatar
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    road biking: already over it

    Did anyone else here try to do road biking and find it as oddly crappy as I do? As documented in another thread, I spent a ba-jillion dollars (for me) on a road bike and the shorts and the computer and the water bottle cage and the this, that and the other, and there's just so much I can't get over:

    1. I hate those damn cleats. I know it's supposed to get easier the more I do it, but I just hate 'em.
    2. My taint is about to explode. Nothing like constant pain to spoil one's exercise goals.
    3. I can't get over the fear of riding on some of the roads I've been riding on. I know I'm gonna get squished like a bug at any moment, and if I were on a heartier bike like my commuter, I could bail into someone's yard if I got squeezed too badly. And I wouldn't have to pray I could clip out of the pedals in time to bail out.
    4. I can't get enough time in on the bike to feel like I'm getting a gym-replacing workout. I think it's because my taint is about to explode and my saddle is a 2x4 covered in some vague white plastic.
    5. Being bent over the handlebars makes my lower back hurt like heck.

    There's just nothing to really like about the experience. Did anyone else have this same reaction, and if so, how did you handle it?

    I'd say I have two options at this point:

    1. Throw even more money into this black hole moneypit and can the clip-in pedals and put on some regular, I can wear tennis shoes pedals. Also, get a saddle that isn't a 2x4 in the barest of disguises.
    2. Sell the bike for a considerable loss.

    I know I need to give it more time, but damn, I'm aggravated at the whole thing. I got a bike in the first place to save my aging car, not put more miles on it driving to out-of-the-way places so I don't get run over riding the bike. I dunno what I was thinking, but I wasn't thinking clearly.
    Last edited by john423; 11-03-10 at 10:14 AM. Reason: added stuff

  2. #2
    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
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    Can't help as I had the opposite experience but I eased into it. Went from clips and straps to clipless on my MTB. Picked up an old road bike to start on. Replaced it with a new, low-end road bike (which is now my commuter and still sporting the original saddle). Bought a new, Ultegra-equipped road bike and never looked back. Cycling clothing was a gradual move as well. And I started the process weighing in around 255 lbs.

    Being comfortable in traffic is a gained skill as well. You need to realize that you belong there and have the same right to the road as the cagers. It is a bit intimidating to take the lane with a semi coming up behind you but it gets easier with experience.

    That being said, it sounds like a fit issue as well as a saddle issue. I'd go back to the bike shop and have them help you get more comfortable.

  3. #3
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Toe clips No straps works for me. Got in 2000 miles last month.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
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  4. #4
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Take on your problems with road riding one at a time.
    You will get it down to nothing.

    How many miles have you put on the road bike?
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  5. #5
    Senior Member dbikingman's Avatar
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    Cycling isn't for everyone. I do like it because as you mention it can be used for transportation which is a nice benefit.

    You don't mention how long you have been riding or how much you have ridden. As has been mentioned riding is a skill that needs to be acquired. I remember the first time I came down a hill at 33 mph on my road bike. I thought those skinny tires would fold over and it seemed really unsteady. I now go faster and it feels fine. As you gain confidence in your ability to hold a line you will find riding on the road less of a problem. I found ths site http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/safety/...ycle/rules.htm which covers some good rules for riding on the road.

    The pain in the taint could be you need to ride more, a different seat, a proper fit, or all the above.

  6. #6
    Senior Member gunner65's Avatar
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    Platform pedals for now and get yourself a rear view mirror. I have one of the mirrors that attaches to the lever hood of the Shimano type brifters and it is really useful. Riding with a mirror gives me alot more confidence. As for saddle that is another story but your taint should not be where your weight is riding. Your sits bones are where you need to be carrying the majority of your weight and a properly adjusted bike with the correct saddle should significantly help this situation. I wouldnt give up yet you just need a few adjustments and some time riding. Good luck.

  7. #7
    Cat 5 field stuffer bbeasley's Avatar
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    John,

    I did almost the same thing. I bought a cheap big box cruiser to prove to myself that I would stick to it. I made it a few weeks on the cruiser and one 22 mile ride.

    I then bought a Trek 2.3 with all the goodies including @#$%$#% clipless pedals. This expensive, for me, bike came with a seat I'll call Prison Sex.

    I took off through town and almost got killed, clipless pedals, before reaching a stretch of road with less traffic. It was the most miserable ride to date. I hated everything. Shifting and braking was awkward, Prison Sex hated me, and as far a clipless pedals go.... what a joke.

    I took off the $*)(*^)( clipless pedals and put on Duh pedals. I then went to my LBS. They gave me the standard line about giving Prison Sex time. I thanked them for their advice and forcefully asked for a loaner "real" seat. I randomly picked from 3 choices and it's been great. I also left with a pair of bib cycling shorts. Zero seat discomfort from that moment on. I'm riding 80 - 100 per week.

    I then loaded my bike in a car and drove 25 miles to a bike path. Here is where I learned to ride my bike. I rode the bike for about 60 miles (3 trips) before getting on the street, for any distance, again.

    Next step was a very professional fitting from my LBS. The guy spent a good 2 hours tweaking my bike. I was having just a touch of wrist and back discomfort and all that disappeared after the fitting.

    I now love the bike and the experience. I rode my friends new high end MTB the other day and it felt like a boat anchor. I should add though, I ride on VERY smooth roads. I would not enjoy my bike on rough streets. I keep my cruiser at my daughters house in New Orleans for cruising the quarter (rough streets).

    One data point only. About saddles

    <Cynicism On>

    I suspect that bike manufactures intentionally put POS saddles on new bikes so the LBS can make an extra $100. Had I followed the wisdom of "waiting X weeks or X miles to toughen up" I would not be riding my bike.

    I don't think I got lucky and found the magic saddle for me. It's not a Brooks (dare I say that) and I don't think it matters. I think it's just a decent saddle and a far cry from Prison Sex. On the other hand, I didn't give the loaner saddle back and instead just paid for it.

    </Cynicism>

    I'm now using the @#$%$% clipless pedals and am slowly getting better. The reason I put them back on was I had a touch of knee discomfort and switching to the clipless cleared that up.

    For me it was just to much new stuff at one time and I had to back up and ease my learning curve.

    BTW I'm 53 y/o, 5'8" and 230 (down from 252), all fat. I'm 8 weeks and 600 miles in to all this.

    I hope you find your answer and continue to enjoy cycling!

  8. #8
    Rain, rain go away john423's Avatar
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    I've been commuting for 15 months now, so I'd like to think I've got a bit of experience on a bike.

    But as you know, it's a different critter. First off, I'm upright, which is huge. The seat's nice and padded, which is huger. The only time my butt has ever hurt in my commuter's seat is when I tried to do a 66-mile bike trail. And I feel safer on my commuter, not clipped in and able to go "off-road" if the situation screams for it.

    I like riding for distance, but I'm not sure I need a road bike to do it. I figured I wanted to enter some distance events, which I figured I needed a road bike for. Big mistake.

    I've already been down a hill at 30-plus MPH, that was fun. I've had the bike out about 4-5 times, rode for two hours yesterday. It was just two of the longest hours of my life. I did the same set of country roads twice so I wouldn't hit much traffic. I probably have about 50-60 miles on the bike.

    I think I need to flip the stem, whatever the heck that means, if I wanna get some relief from the back problems. I've already ordered a better rear-view mirror, which would help my comfort feeling on the bike dramatically. I've just gotten used to a rear view on my commuter, and I gotta know if something's behind me, especially on some of these country roads.

    I've heard a million times that the taint pain will go away with time as the area "toughens up," but holy hell, when does this start?

    Look, I know I'm giving up too easily. I'll go back out tomorrow and try again, and keep trying for the rest of the month and then figure out what to do from there. But I still feel silly driving somewhere to ride a bike, it just seems to defeat the purpose. My neighborhood isn't suited for taking a road bike out, though.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john423 View Post
    I'd say I have two options at this point:

    1. Throw even more money into this black hole moneypit and can the clip-in pedals and put on some regular, I can wear tennis shoes pedals. Also, get a saddle that isn't a 2x4 in the barest of disguises.
    2. Sell the bike for a considerable loss.
    Well, there really does become a point where #1 is more expensive than #2. And it's your call when that point arrives.

    Now, if you have off-line cycling friends, you might be able to get somebody to donate a pair of platform pedals, and even install them for you. When I switched from the ones that came with my CX bike to clilpless pedals, I gave the old ones away. I'm sure that's pretty common. If not, the bike shop ought to refund you if you get them recently, and if not, you should be able to sell them and the shoes.

    Good saddles are expensive, and highly personal. You should just try as many of them as possible. Lots of them have cut-outs so that your taint won't be pressed into the, um, splintery 2x4.

    Also, stems are fairly cheap - probably $30 on average. It sounds like you should look for one with more rise. Most people have their bars too low. If you've been talked into "flipping it" by the roadies, flip it back upright.

    I don't know what this would cost, but you can get a set of cross brakes, which are levers that go on the tops, and make the bike feel more like a MTB. My first drop bar bike had these, and it made the transition a lot easier.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  10. #10
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    Another newbie with about 3 weeks and 90 miles on the bike. I was having a big issue with butt/taint pain and was dreading it a bit when I went for what would be my longest ride yet yesterday even though that was only 13 miles. I've got a cheap entry level Trek 1.1(with presumably a super cheap seat) and cheap bike shorts from Nashbar(which helped over just gym shorts but aren't world beaters). About 9 miles in it was bad enough that I had to stand and coast a bit to relieve it and I was just looking forward to getting back but after shifting around a bit I discovered I had been sitting too far forward on the seat(so my weight - 255lbs was resting on my taint and the narrow part of the saddle). When I scooted back it felt a bit like my butt was sticking off the back of the seat, but I could clearly feel my sit bones resting on the broad part of the seat and the pain instantly subsided and I was able to pedal full out and hit my targeted pace for the ride, making up for the time lost coasting. The rest of my body position felt good sitting farther forward so I just assumed the pain was part of the learning process but now I know it wasn't. When I got back I slid the seat forward on the rails and it seems good to go now. I don't expect it will feel like a la-z-boy but now at least I know my miles won't be limited due to that discomfort.

  11. #11
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
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    time
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    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

  12. #12
    Me and the cat... Pamestique's Avatar
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    Cycling is my life... can't imagine not ever doing it... to those wondering why you continue with the sport... it would be worth your while to find a bike fitter in your area and make an appointment. The fitter can tell you why everything hurts and what can make things better. It is surprising how little changes help. I have a new bike and the first few rides were miserable. I even went back to riding the old bike since it was comfortable. I finally took the time to analyze my complaint and realized the saddle was too far forward. I shrove it back and "voila" complaints are over! Bike is now awesome to ride!

    Sometimes to consider... broader (in a seat that is) is not better. A broad seat is intended for a rider in a very upright position, say like on an english style or beach cruiser. If you lean forward even a bit, that broad seat will definitely cut into your tender parts. Also, invest in a good pair of bike shorts. A good pair. You have to pay good money ($80 - 120) but it will be worth it.

    Also as to using cleats and pedals... I can't imagine riding any other way. It just feels right and makes you one with the bike. Pedaling is easier and more efficient. Climbing is better. You need to find the right shoe for you (I swear by Sidi's but they are expensive) and the right cleat. I went through 6 cleat systems to finally find the right one for me (Time Alium on the road bike and Time ZControl on the mountain bike).

    And stay with it. You can't run a marathon after 2 days of walking a mile. It takes time. Set up realistic goals. Baby steps. Ease into it. But just know, it is a mental thing. I have been riding almost 50 years and some of the stuff I do still hurts... it's not suppose to be easy it's suppose to be exercise and no pain, no gain.

    If you want to correspondence about this offline, just PM Me...
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  13. #13
    your nightmare gal chipcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john423 View Post
    1. I hate those damn cleats. I know it's supposed to get easier the more I do it, but I just hate 'em.
    2. My taint is about to explode. Nothing like constant pain to spoil one's exercise goals.
    3. I can't get over the fear of riding on some of the roads I've been riding on. I know I'm gonna get squished like a bug at any moment, and if I were on a heartier bike like my commuter, I could bail into someone's yard if I got squeezed too badly. And I wouldn't have to pray I could clip out of the pedals in time to bail out.
    4. I can't get enough time in on the bike to feel like I'm getting a gym-replacing workout. I think it's because my taint is about to explode and my saddle is a 2x4 covered in some vague white plastic.
    5. Being bent over the handlebars makes my lower back hurt like heck.
    1. There ain't no rule that says you gotta use clipless pedals to ride a road bike. You can use platforms, toe clips, cages and straps, power grips, or plain ole SPD MTB-style clipless if you want.

    2. There ain't no rule that says you must have an ass-hatchet saddle or that you can't tweak your riding position for best comfort.

    3. Don't hug the edge...give yourself room to bail and prevent being squeezed. I've been riding on the roads for over 40 years...so it's like...well...riding a bike, to me. Take yourself the LAB Road courses and ease into it...with experience comes comfort. Were you OK driving a car at first?

    4. Commuting helps to work your workout into your normal day. As far as the saddle..refer to #2

    5. Just because you are on a road bike doesn't mean you need your bars inches below the saddle or that you have to always be in the drops. Stem lengths/angles can be changed, a new fork with an uncut steerer enables more spacers or maybe you just need a different size frame. Plus, you can do most of your riding on the hoods or tops, only using the drops for wind and/or sprints. Just as with your saddle, fit and positioning are key.

    Bottom line: You don't need a road racing bike/riding position to be a road cyclist.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  14. #14
    Senior Member mkadam68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john423 View Post
    ...I've heard a million times that the taint pain will go away with time as the area "toughens up," but holy hell, when does this start
    Not before this:

    Quote Originally Posted by john423 View Post
    ...I've already been down a hill at 30-plus MPH, that was fun. I've had the bike out about 4-5 times, rode for two hours yesterday. It was just two of the longest hours of my life. I did the same set of country roads twice so I wouldn't hit much traffic. I probably have about 50-60 miles on the bike..
    When buying new, it takes me 2-500 miles before I decide if I want to stick with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by john423 View Post
    Look, I know I'm giving up too easily. I'll go back out tomorrow and try again, and keep trying for the rest of the month and then figure out what to do from there. But I still feel silly driving somewhere to ride a bike, it just seems to defeat the purpose. My neighborhood isn't suited for taking a road bike out, though.
    Good. See if you can find another, more experienced rider to ride with. A club ride, or a bike shop ride. Then, ask them these questions.

    As far as the saddle goes: you're used to a wide, cushy saddle (have springs on it?). Of course going to a more firm, road saddle is going to take some adjustment. You may as well be starting from scratch as far as your gel saddle goes. And now, you also know why we use road saddles: the gels are torture on longer rides.

    Good luck.

    Visit The C-Blog : the blog about cycling.

  15. #15
    Descends like a rock pallen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbeasley View Post
    I suspect that bike manufactures intentionally put POS saddles on new bikes so the LBS can make an extra $100. Had I followed the wisdom of "waiting X weeks or X miles to toughen up" I would not be riding my bike.

    I don't think I got lucky and found the magic saddle for me. It's not a Brooks (dare I say that) and I don't think it matters. I think it's just a decent saddle and a far cry from Prison Sex. On the other hand, I didn't give the loaner saddle back and instead just paid for it.
    haha, It does seem that way, but I dont thinks its quite so sinister. The manufacturers are looking at ways to shave bits off the cost on complete bike. Look at how many come with generic or cheaper cranks, and other components that have been "switched" out of a full group. A nice seat just doesnt sell a bike like the latest and greatest shimancampollo carbon fiber dohickey. Plus, seats are a very "personal" kind of thing. What feels like prison sex to one might be at least adequate to another.

    As for the OP. Fit. Fit Fit. Skip the clipless until you get more comfortable being on the road. Look for different routes. There are a lot of roads that I just wont ride on. Go back to your shop for some fit advice. If they cant help you or seem to not know what to do, try a different shop. Unless you are just way off on frame size, it shouldn't cost a fortune to get you dialed in better with a seat you can tolerate.

    My question would be, when you arent in pain or afraid of getting run over, do you like cycling? If you do, then see if you can address the issues one by one. If you really dont like it much when everything is going ok, then this might not be for you.

  16. #16
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    1. Try different saddles. Or sit on a Specialized dealer's ass-o-meter to get your sit-bone spacing measured so you can start closer to the right place. One which fits your butt will be a lot more comfortable (assuming you've put a few hundred miles in and toughened up a bit).

    2. Pay some one for a fitting. With taint pressure and back problems you probably have issues in fore/aft positioning, saddle tilt, and/or handle bar reach/drop issues. Many bike shop employees are more interested in selling what they have on the shop floor and aren't going to get that right. Aesthetics often trump functionality (a 7-shaped bicycle stem has a look which hasn't gone out of style for most of a century, but it's unlikely to be right for you when you're faced with limited steerer tube length and the move from <= 2cm frame increments to S-M-L that mean half the people will be seated far above the head tube end for a big drop).

    3. You do know that most roadies usually ride on the brake hoods? If you're struggling to keep up with a group, you might need the 8% drop in power required at that speed. You may also appreciate the help struggling to get home against a killer head wind. But out solo for 'fun' it's not going to get your heart rate up and below 25 MPH isn't going to net a full 5% speed increase (like .5-1 MPH).

    4. Wear decent bike shorts without gel padding so you don't have seams putting pressure on your taint.
    Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 11-03-10 at 01:51 PM.

  17. #17
    Rain, rain go away john423's Avatar
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    I love riding my commuter bike and I still wanna ride a century. I just figured I needed a road bike to make the best of club rides/longer-mileage competitions. I figured I'd need the clip-in pedals to get the most out of the bike (and they are very, very helpful on some of the hills I've been on).

    I think what it boils down to is this: I know I can, with time and money, get the pedals/saddle issues taken care of. But I gotta wonder if I'm so used to the position of a commuter bike - back totally straight - that I can't handle the back positioning of a road bike. And a road bike isn't meant to be ridden with a totally-straight back like a commuter. Nothing I do can overcome this. I can tweak it, but not solve it. So is this such a big difference that it makes spending another cent on this bike a stupid idea?

    I ride on the brake hoods pretty much constantly, except when I'm going down a hill and I feel comfortable at the bottom of the drop bars to try to get some speed.

    I asked anyone from the local road club to volunteer to accompany me on a ride soon just to give me some tips on what I'm doing wrong, and offered "tuition" in post-ride food from the launch point. I paid too much to give up this easily, I just had a bad ride on a poorly-picked stretch of road, nearly fell at the start in those damn shoes and, frankly, my taint is so damn sore. I've gotta get farther back in the saddle (hey, that's a song), but then it seems like I can barely reach the brake hoods - I'm tall (6-2 1/2), but I have oddly short arms.

    I think getting someone to ride with me is key. I just warned them that the pace would not exactly be the greatest in the world.

    You guys have provided so much great advice, I swear, this is the single most helpful place on the Internet. No "get over it, newbie" crap. Thanks.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Pinyon's Avatar
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    It sounds like the bike is set up wrong for you (play with moving the seat forward and the bars up in little steps). You DEFINITELY need a new saddle. I'm damn picky about my saddle. It can make the difference between riding being fun or torture. I expect not to feel a new saddle at all for the first 30 minutes or so. It definitely should not hurt for weeks. Ever.

    I had a similar, but opposite, experience on vacation last week, when my wife and I rented a pair of hybrid bikes to ride around Santa Monica and Venice Beaches in California. The super-wide gel-padded seat chafed my butt, and I felt like I had less control sitting up so high (harder to lean into a turn safely). There was no way to lean forward and engage my hamstrings, so my pedal stroke was choppy and jerky (mash, let go, mash...). Whenever we went over 15 mph, I would naturally start to lean down to get comfortable, where-upon my knees would start smacking my forearms, and knocking my hands off the handlebars.

    At a traffic-light, this guy in a sports car started revving his engine behind me, because I was sitting on the white-line that separated the right-turn lane and traffic going straight (where he was). I wanted to get away from this idiot as fast as possible, so I tried to really push it out of the intersection. The problem was, that I forgot that I was not clipped in, and almost fell off the bike when I tried to lift up on the right pedal. My foot flew up off the pedal and I slammed my knee into handlebars really hard. The resulting bruise is a nice shade of green today.

    As others have said, road biking is not for everyone. I just happen to love it. I know people that are in really good shape that hate road biking as much as I hate running. Every attempt that I've made at running has confirmed my hatred for me trying that sport.

    My Bike Blog
    ------
    1987 Trek 1000 Aluminum
    1993 Cannondale M300
    2008 Specialized Allez Elite Compact

  19. #19
    Pedals, Paddles and Poles Daspydyr's Avatar
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    Experience, experiment and miles my friend. I personally prefer riding MTB for some of the traffic reasons you mentioned. But you have made the investment in equipment for the road world. You can have a ton of health improvements and weight loss if you get the details ironed out. Since you already have a goal to ride a Century you want to be a BLACK BELT Roadie! AH SO, grasshopper! Don't give up, get better.

    I just completed my first Century last month. It is worth getting to that point. You can do it, even more than that, you can kick some butt doing it.
    I think its disgusting and terrible how people treat Lance Armstrong, especially after winning 7 Tour de France Titles while on drugs!

    I can't even find my bike when I'm on drugs. -Willie N.

  20. #20
    Me and the cat... Pamestique's Avatar
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    John - spend the money for a fitting... you should be comfortable on your saddle and still be able to reach the brake hoods with a bend in your elbow. If that's a long stretch for you 1) the bike is too big 2) &/or the stem is too long 3) &/or the stem angle is not high enough....

    I ride two road bikes and 2 mountain bikes. They are all alittle different but I have tried to get them set up, as much as possibe, the same. It is hard to be bolt upright on one one and leaning forward an another. Body parts just don't have a chance to "firm" up and get use to the pressure.

    My guy is tall but is very short waisted. Because of that he is more comfortable on a woman specific designed bike but since it's "sissy" to ride WSD bikes, he has his custom designed. He's big so has alot of weight issue complaints. Because his hips are narrow he's found a narrow saddle is better for him. If your hips are wide, look for something with alittle gel and a cut out - you might even consider a woman's saddle which is little wider in back and has a shorter nose.

    and as to the tenders problem... delicate question, are you wearing a bike short and chamois or shorts and underwear? Just know underwear is going to cuase problems... always use bike shorts sans panties underneath...
    ______________________________________________________________

    Private docent led mountain bike rides through Limestone Canyon. Go to letsgooutside.org and register today! Also available: hikes, equestrian rides and family events as well as trail maintenance and science study.

  21. #21
    Pedals, Paddles and Poles Daspydyr's Avatar
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    Riding "Commando" or as Pam says "sans panties" was a surprising improvement in riding comfort. A good pair of shorts is a great "comfort." A saddle with a Canal down the middle is a big help.
    I think its disgusting and terrible how people treat Lance Armstrong, especially after winning 7 Tour de France Titles while on drugs!

    I can't even find my bike when I'm on drugs. -Willie N.

  22. #22
    your nightmare gal chipcom's Avatar
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    Personally, I am just fine on my bikes...even the road bike, even for centuries, with flat-seamed or gusseted crotch shorts with similar seamed/crotched merino wool boxers


    ...but of course my ass has decades of hardening.

    Granted, with cycling shorts/bibs, commando is the way to go.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  23. #23
    Senior Member gunner65's Avatar
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    This is what I used as a base for fitting my own bike. I used a kitchen chair (instead of a trainer) and my helpful wife to take some of the measurements then when I got the base line I tweaked it over several weeks. My fit is perfect for me the only pains I have now are sore leg muscles but that is what I am after right? I am not a huge proponent of paying to fit a bike especially when there is endless amounts of information on the subject.

    http://www.jimlangley.net/crank/bikefit.html

  24. #24
    Senior Member EKW in DC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
    Toe clips No straps works for me. Got in 2000 miles last month.
    You averaged 60+ miles a day last month?

  25. #25
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EKW in DC View Post
    You averaged 60+ miles a day last month?
    22 rides for 2037 miles (17 centuries) I was trying to ride a century every ride.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

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