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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 02-02-11, 03:53 PM   #1
JusticeZero
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Seat won't stay up

Not completely sure where this should go..
My wife, in winter, rides one of those very upright bikes (some variety of Trek Navigator, to be exact) with the riding position angled so her feet can reach the ground or the pedals at extension. This means that most of her weight is on the seat. We haven't had much luck finding how to keep the seat from sliding down into the frame, though; it's tight and I don't want to mess the seatpost up. What do you suggest?
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Old 02-02-11, 04:22 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JusticeZero View Post
Not completely sure where this should go..
My wife, in winter, rides one of those very upright bikes (some variety of Trek Navigator, to be exact) with the riding position angled so her feet can reach the ground or the pedals at extension. This means that most of her weight is on the seat. We haven't had much luck finding how to keep the seat from sliding down into the frame, though; it's tight and I don't want to mess the seatpost up. What do you suggest?
There is but one way to resolve this issue. Buy a new seat post clamp ( get a really good one) http://www.amazon.com/ACTION-SEATPOS...685311&sr=1-67 and torque the hell outta it!!!!!
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Old 02-02-11, 04:43 PM   #3
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Navigators have quick release seat post clamps. On the back side of the lever, there should be a nob. With the lever in the open position, slightly tighten the nob and then flip the lever. The lever should close with some resistance. If you don't have much resistance, open the lever again and turn the nob. Keep trying until the nob closes with resistance. This should keep the post in the right position. The levers can take pressure, and it is hard to break one by closing a lever. I don't believe that you need to replace it. If it still doesn't work, take it to a bike shop (I work as bike mechanic), and someone should be able to quickly help you.
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Old 02-02-11, 04:56 PM   #4
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cut a strip out of a pop can and slide it into the frame between the seatpost then tighten it up
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Old 02-02-11, 04:57 PM   #5
JusticeZero
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It has resistance; it has enough resistance that I (270 lb male martial arts instructor) have to struggle a bit to get the thing closed, and my wife can't budge it at all. Tightening the clamp was the first thing we thought to do, and it hasn't been enough.
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Old 02-02-11, 05:01 PM   #6
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I had trouble keeping the seat post from slipping on my Fisher, and considered getting rid of the QR and replacing it with a standard seat clamp bolt. The bike shop employee I spoke with correctly deduced that if I was willing to do that, I had no need for the QR feature, and suggested that I close the QR and then torque the hell out of the bolt from the other (wrench) side, and save myself the cost of a new bolt. Either way the QR is worthless, but this way it saved me a few bucks.

Don't know why that hadn't occurred to me. D'oh!
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Old 02-02-11, 05:07 PM   #7
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We had a problem with our tandem long ago. Well known seatposts sucked and wouldn't stay up without a rubber shim.

One day I met a rider that said, "dude, I bet your posts aren't perfectly round so they don't clamp properly". I spend like $10 on a replacement post at the shop, it worked! EZ cheap fix!
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Old 02-02-11, 05:38 PM   #8
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Ditto for me, I didn't have a QR and I finally got to the point I didn't care if I broke the carbon fiber seat post and..
"torqued the hell outta it!!!!!"

Or as a Motorcycle Mechanic friend of mines says "Tighten it till just before it breaks, no more"

Problem solved. It sure doesn't feel right tightening it that much but it worked.
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Old 02-02-11, 06:26 PM   #9
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My daughter's Trek mountain bike has the same problem. The seat tends to slowly drop down even when the QR clamp is securely tightened. Measuring the OD of the seat post and the ID of the seat tube shows a slight mismatch - the stock seat post is a little too small for the frame. Presumably a new seat post would solve the issue, but we went with the lower cost soda can fix instead. A shim from an aluminum can around the seat post and no more slippage.
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Old 02-02-11, 07:16 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JusticeZero View Post
Not completely sure where this should go..
My wife, in winter, rides one of those very upright bikes (some variety of Trek Navigator, to be exact) with the riding position angled so her feet can reach the ground or the pedals at extension. This means that most of her weight is on the seat. We haven't had much luck finding how to keep the seat from sliding down into the frame, though; it's tight and I don't want to mess the seatpost up. What do you suggest?
Three possible solutions:

1) pull the seat post out, take a rag with some chain cleaner and clean all the smutz off the post, and go around the inside of the seat post clamp, be careful the edges are sometimes sharp. Put a very thin layer of grease on the post below where it clamps and pop it back in, that often fixes it. The grease also makes the post easier to get out, if you ever need it out.

2) If that does not work, pull out the seat post clamp, go to the hardware store and get a bolt and nut the same diameter and length, put the bolt in, tighten the nut with a wrench as tight as you can. QR seat posts clamps are only good for one thing, it makes it easier for some low life to pop the clamp and steal the saddle and the post. Do NOT do this with a CF frame or post, it's possible to crack them and that would not be good.

3) If that does not work, pop back into the hardware store, and get a hose clamp, one that is adjustable with a screw, put that around the seat post above the existing clamp, and tighten it up. This will prevent it from sliding down, you can paint it to match the bike or the post, if your worried about it being visible. That seat post ain't going anywhere.
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Old 02-03-11, 01:03 PM   #11
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My suggestion is to read everyone Else's suggestions, however I don't recommend over tightening your clamp bolt.

1) Take out your seatpost and wipe it down. If that doesn't work then step 2
2) Look into getting a new seat clamp. If that doesn't work then step 3
3) Look into replacing your existing seatpost. If that doesn't work step 4
4) Go to the bike shop to see if they can diagnose your problem. If that doesnt work then step 5
5) Get a new bike and give me your old one. (Simply optional ;-)
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Old 02-03-11, 01:31 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
There is but one way to resolve this issue. Buy a new seat post clamp ( get a really good one) http://www.amazon.com/ACTION-SEATPOS...685311&sr=1-67 and torque the hell outta it!!!!!
My wife and both have Trek Navigators dating to 2004. I also have a Trek Multitrack.
Seat post slippage was a problem with all three of them. The LBS fixed me up with clamps as you show in your link. That ended the seat post slipping problem.
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Old 02-03-11, 01:32 PM   #13
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You may need a new clamp (cheaper) or seatpost (not so cheap), but check things out carefully first. Take it all apart (seat tube, clamp) and make sure there's no grit or dirt on the inside or outside of the seat tube, the seatpost, or inside of the clamp. A very little grease is good between clamp and seat tube, and seatpost and tube. Look carefully at the seatpost; I had a situation where the edge of my clamp had been bent slightly, and was digging in to the post. 1/16" of metal isn't going to hold me up! Trimmed it off with a utility knife (the clamp was aluminum), and all's been well ever since.
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Old 02-03-11, 01:51 PM   #14
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Before you go to all the trouble, make sure the seat clamp is properly aligned on your wife's Navigator. I had the same issue on mine, and I felt so stupid when I found out that it was such a simple thing causing the seatpost to slide down. I haven't had a problem since.

Judy
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Old 02-03-11, 02:07 PM   #15
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This once happened to me with a Wal-Mart Scwhinn. My solution was to pull out the seat post and cut a broomstick to the correct length an put it in the seat tube with a quarter on top the broomstick so the seat post would not dig into the stick. I had to shave a little flat spot on the broomstick to clear the water bottle holder screws. Worked like a charm.
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Old 02-03-11, 02:20 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Road Hog View Post
This once happened to me with a Wal-Mart Scwhinn. My solution was to pull out the seat post and cut a broomstick to the correct length an put it in the seat tube with a quarter on top the broomstick so the seat post would not dig into the stick. I had to shave a little flat spot on the broomstick to clear the water bottle holder screws. Worked like a charm.
interesting...
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Old 02-03-11, 02:39 PM   #17
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Must be a problem that's inherent with some Treks. My 7300 has the same issue. I followed the advice of some of the others above and just torqued the snot out of the nut. Solved the problem very easily but, about every thousand miles or so, it needs a little more torquing.
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Old 02-05-11, 05:32 PM   #18
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I had a similar problem and received two suggestions. The first has already been made in this thread, replace the quick release clamp with a traditional one using a hex bolt. It does hold better. The second was to remove the grease from the seat post and replace it with carbon assembly compound. This is a grease with some "grit" in it. So it prevents seizure like grease, but also adds friction.

The two only cost ~$15 and I haven't had a problem since.
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Old 02-05-11, 06:21 PM   #19
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Several years ago, there was a similar little story in MBA, no more than a couple paragraphs; they used sidewalk chalk.
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