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  1. #1
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    Life changing moment. (help me do it)

    Hello my name is chris I am 20 years old and i have decided to change who and what I am.

    I am currently 6'2 and roughly 265 lbs. I don't know how I got to this point I used to be at around 190 lbs and very athletic. I had multiple surgeries on a bone in skull and the doctors would bar me from all physical exertion for months on end so I would have a surgery and just go a whole year without doing anything. I think i used it as an excuse to not get back into shape. More recently the effects of being overweight have come to hit me in the face as a relative of mine who raised me has just been diagnosed with diabetes due to being obese. I saw that relatives health rapidly decline and spiral out of control. I help take care of this relative now and I want to make her proud and myself proud. I want to change myself before I get to that point of being diabetic. Cycling will be my redemption. I wanna cycle in the tour de cure event.

    http://main.diabetes.org/site/TR/Tou...try&fr_id=7604

    Can any veteran cyclist give me some knowledge on what I can do to prepare for this and how I should prepare for this? Its such a scary feeling not knowing anything about what I will be undertaking. I currently have a trek 720 multitrack bike I am using atm. Kind of a junker but I plan on taking it to the bike shop and getting it road ready.
    Im asking for ideas or help planning how I can get ready for this event since I have no cycling experience other then riding a bike when I was younger. My goal isn't to be skinny but rather to be healthy and fit. I am going to be joining a gym in preparation for the 3 months I have until this event. I plan on dedicating myself to doing this 110%. The only thing I am lacking is the knowledge of a mentor.



    Thanks in advance to anyone who responds.
    Last edited by Chadlay; 02-11-11 at 08:13 AM. Reason: Post moved

  2. #2
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Hi Chris, Welcome to Bike Forums.

    You have made a Good Decision.
    Get the bike tuned up.
    Start riding, go slow. Do short rides. Your butt will get sore. Get some bike shorts.

    Rest and take a day off when you need it.
    You will get stronger each week.
    Took me 500 miles for my legs to get in shape.
    I started by riding 5 miles at a time. Take a break and ride another 5 miles if everything feels OK.
    Rode 80 laps around the block one day for 40 miles.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  3. #3
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    Haha thanks for responding really appreciate your advice. I take it from your info your also a fellow Texan! Im planning on getting my bike tuned up tomorrow along with new tires. Is their any must have gear I need for cycling along with shorts and a helmet? Also I have been reading the forums for a bit under this section for us clydesdales. What kind of tires / wheels should I look for at my shop? Should I have them re do my spokes and tru my wheels also?

    San Antonio, Texas here
    Last edited by Chadlay; 02-10-11 at 10:44 PM. Reason: No reason to make a whole post.

  4. #4
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Get slick tires, Get floor pump with a gage. Pump your tires up before each ride.

    Get the wheels checked, hubs greased, spokes adjusted.

    Some way to carry a spare tube, levers, method to pump up a flat after you changed the tube. A mini pump and or CO 2.

    League City here in Galveston County.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  5. #5
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    Another question is riding a hybrid bike over 50 miles (in a day) not a plausible decision or should I outright just buy a new/used road bike ( have about 500 bucks to work with) for a bike?

  6. #6
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Your bike is good for now.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  7. #7
    Senior Member Passage4's Avatar
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    Hi Chris, and welcome. I'm certainly not a veteran, but have had some experience riding a hybrid. I bought it a few years ago as a first bike (as an adult) and find it very comfortable because of the upright seating position. This is personal preference though and I understand that some road bikes have a more relaxed geometry. In my experience, I've traded speed for comfort.

    As far as riding 50+ miles a day on your bike, it depends on your comfort. The only way to know is by trying it. I swear by my larger, Avenir plush saddle, but some members here prefer a smaller or more narrow one. Also the wider the tire, generally the more it will soak up the bumps and things in the road. Again, my only experience is on my 700x40c tires and the trade-off is slower speeds but better comfort.

    My suggestion would be to put the money into the bike you already have, assuming it wouldn't be too expensive. The only way you can determine if it will be comfortable is by riding it.
    Last edited by Passage4; 02-10-11 at 11:58 PM.
    2006 Raleigh Passage 4.0

  8. #8
    Riding twobadfish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chadlay View Post
    Another question is riding a hybrid bike over 50 miles (in a day) not a plausible decision or should I outright just buy a new/used road bike ( have about 500 bucks to work with) for a bike?
    I rode 50 miles up a mountain on a hybrid and while I had some complaints, none of them were deal breakers. Try it out and see how it goes...

  9. #9
    Senior Member Northwestrider's Avatar
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    Hi Chris: Welcome to the cycling community, it's a great one to be involved with. When talking to friends that seem interesting in entering the cycling fold, I always suggest that they not worry how fast or far they go on any particular ride. Their goal should be simply to enjoy the ride, period. So having said that, I would not suggest you do anything special to train for the "tour de cure event" just ride and have fun. If you train too hard, it's quite possible you'll burn out. So IMO just ride , enjoy and if you happen to feel ready for the "tour de cure" go for it. If not, it'll be there next year. Good luck, and once again welcome aboard.

  10. #10
    Senior Member skilsaw's Avatar
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    Hi Chris, and welcome to the forum.
    I checked the ride web site and think you should aim for the 53 mile ride on day 1 and 56 mile ride on day 2.
    If you accomplish that, you will feel like you've won the lottery.

    Don't over improve your bike right away. It may not be a good fit for you and you may end up riding something different. It would be a shame to invest $100 or more in fixing it up, and then decide to ride something else.
    A person can ride any bike 10 miles... The discomfort comes after 10 miles.

    Talk to your bike store about fit. You can adjust stem length and angle and seat height and angle,

    Your bike should be a reasonable fit, it doesn't need to be a perfect fit. You are not entering the Olympics.

    Other than that, just start riding. Half an hour to begin with, 3 or 4 days per week, and ramp it up from there.

    I think you are taking a bold step, being responsible for that part of your health that you can influence. Good for you.

    I'm 56 years old and have been a clyde for the last 15 years. 250 lbs lately, but I've started on the way down.
    My plan is for a tour in the second half of April that is just over 700 miles, and I'll allow myself 2 weeks, but I may finish in 12 days.

    Having a goal and making a commitment feels great.
    Go for it,
    And keep us informed of your progress.
    Don't be afraid to ask questions here.
    The one who has the most bikes wins.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Street Pedaler's Avatar
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    Hi, Chris.

    I feel ya, Bro. I'm 45 and started Cycling in '08 after my second major back surgery. I'm also a Type 2 Diabetic. I can't tell you what cycling will do for you, but I CAN tell you what it's done for me. Since I started riding, I have come off of ALL of my Oral Diabetes meds (I was on as many as 6 before). I still take a couple of insulin shots a day but my dosage is steadily dropping and my goal is to eventually come off of the insulin as well.


    I've had three discs removed from my back and, in '08, had two titanium rods and six screws installed (lol). I've got pretty severe neuropathy in my lower left leg as a result of the spinal injury (the spinal cord was involved). The cycling actually helps keep that under control as well. I don't know how, exactly, but it does. If I go more than a week without riding, I start having serious problems.

    I usually ride 125-150 miles/ week. Like I said, I can't testify as to how it will help you, but it's changed my life. Good luck!!

  12. #12
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chadlay View Post
    Another question is riding a hybrid bike over 50 miles (in a day) not a plausible decision or should I outright just buy a new/used road bike ( have about 500 bucks to work with) for a bike?
    I've ridden centuries and done long tours on my hybrid. It's fine for that. Keep in mind what a fellow Texan once said.... "It's not about the bike."




  13. #13
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Hello!

    You asked before what all you can do to get your 720 ready for the Tour de Cure. First, which route are you planning on riding? Most of the TdC's offer routes from 10-100 miles, so your preparation is really going to depend on which route you're planning on tackling. These rides typically have well stocked rest stops and SAG (Service and Gear) wagons, so I'd say to go for the whole thing. If at any point you can't make it, you can get a ride out.

    For your bike, buy slick or inverted tread tires. Have your wheels rebuilt if the shop deems it necessary. You'll want to have at least two water bottles on your bike. If your bike does not have two bottle mounts, you can get creative with zip ties or hose clamps. In your bottles, have one that is straight water and one mixed 50/50 water and sports drink. Keep the sports drink in the bottle cage that is on your seat tube, water on the down tube. Remember to eat and drink! A water bottle on a ride is usually good for 10 miles. Other than that, have fun and enjoy the event!

  14. #14
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northwestrider View Post
    Hi Chris: Welcome to the cycling community, it's a great one to be involved with. When talking to friends that seem interesting in entering the cycling fold, I always suggest that they not worry how fast or far they go on any particular ride. Their goal should be simply to enjoy the ride, period. So having said that, I would not suggest you do anything special to train for the "tour de cure event" just ride and have fun. If you train too hard, it's quite possible you'll burn out. So IMO just ride , enjoy and if you happen to feel ready for the "tour de cure" go for it. If not, it'll be there next year. Good luck, and once again welcome aboard.
    +1

  15. #15
    Allez means go. bengreen79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
    Rode 80 laps around the block one day for 40 miles.
    Your neighbors must have thought you were crazy!

  16. #16
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chadlay View Post
    Hello my name is chris I am 20 years old and i have decided to change who and what I am.

    I am currently 6'2 and roughly 265 lbs. I don't know how I got to this point I used to be at around 190 lbs and very athletic. I had multiple surgeries on a bone in skull and the doctors would bar me from all physical exertion for months on end so I would have a surgery and just go a whole year without doing anything. I think i used it as an excuse to not get back into shape. More recently the effects of being overweight have come to hit me in the face as a relative of mine who raised me has just been diagnosed with diabetes due to being obese. I saw that relatives health rapidly decline and spiral out of control. I help take care of this relative now and I want to make her proud and myself proud. I want to change myself before I get to that point of being diabetic. Cycling will be my redemption. I wanna cycle in the tour de cure event.

    http://main.diabetes.org/site/TR/Tou...try&fr_id=7604

    Can any veteran cyclist give me some knowledge on what I can do to prepare for this and how I should prepare for this? Its such a scary feeling not knowing anything about what I will be undertaking. I currently have a trek 720 multitrack bike I am using atm. Kind of a junker but I plan on taking it to the bike shop and getting it road ready.
    Im asking for ideas or help planned how I can get ready for this event since I have no cycling experience other then riding a bike when I was younger. My goal isn't to be skinny but rather to be healthy and fit. I am going to be joining a gym in preparation for the 3 months I have until this event. I plan on dedicating myself to doing this 110%. The only thing I am lacking is the knowledge of a mentor.



    Thanks in advance to anyone who responds.
    You have 3 months to train, this is the key, your not riding, your training for an event, the shortest event is the 25 mile ride, and that's plan B, plan A is to shoot for the 50, forget about the 100, you don't have enough time to prepare for that. The Trek is fine for now, with one possible exception, you need to make sure it fits or can be made to fit. You may want to get a professional fitting, that's a better investment then another bike at this point.

    You need some stuff, you want smooth road tires that can handle between 80 and 100PSI, a pump with a gauge, a pair of bike shorts, a bicycle computer with cadence, a couple of bike bottle cages and a couple of bottles, make sure they are different colours. Later on add an on-bike pump (or CO2 inflator), tire levers, spare tube and patch kit and an under seat bag to hold this stuff.

    Go for a 1 mile bike ride. You don't need to do it, continuously if you do A quarter mile, stop and rest for a few minutes then push on, for another quarter mile, that's fine you want that mile though.
    Take the next day off, go to the gym, talk to a trainer, you want to concentrate on the upper body and core, tell the trainer what your game plan is, they may have other ideas. Next day, ride your mile again, if you can do it without stopping, do another one, take the next day off, go to the gym, you repeat this cycle until you reach 15 miles. Now you change it up a little, Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday are ride days, push for 15 miles on each, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, go to the gym. If you don't want to ride in the rain, go to the gym and use the stationary bikes, gotta get your miles in. When your comfortable with your 15 miles, push one day, probably Saturday, to 20 miles, then 25, etc. Realise that if you can do 60 miles in a week, you CAN do 50 miles in a single day, it's not easy, but it can be done.

    There are a few things to remember, first is that you need to drink a full bottle every 45 minutes or so, even when it's cold out, more when you get into the warmer weather. Although your in training mode now, after the event, do not stop, find another event if you have to, but you want to keep training, the next goal should be what is called a metric century, this is 100km (62 miles), then the imperial century (100 miles) and the double metric (200km or 124 miles) should be possible by the end of the year.

    The other thing you need to work on, the engine needs fuel, and the better the fuel, the better the performance, talk to a nutritionist and find out what you need to eat for your training, at age 20 being roughly 70lbs over, you should be able to look after that with no problem.

  17. #17
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    Thanks for all your replies. Its nice seeing all your opinions on this. Im taking my bike to my local bike shop today. My neighbor found out I was getting into cycling because he saw me tinkering with my ride and hooked me up with a hydration backpack that his son used to use. (Not sure how much it holds but I will find out today)

    @ the historian I shall take your advice! Might as well fix up this hybrid a bit and get comfortable with it. I have ridden it recently and it has a really smooth ride and feels very stable. (chromoly body)

    @ everyone else who responded thank you for your input on my situation and your ideas they are worth gold to me!

  18. #18
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    First of all, good for you and good luck.

    Before cycling, I was pretty much the same size as you, but older. I started on my walmart mountain bike and rode that about a month until things started to break. Then I bought a hybrid. I wasn't ready for one of those road bikes with funny handlebars.

    The great thing about hybrids, you can put regular road tires on them and have pretty much the same performance as a road bike, or put treaded tires larger in size and handle gravel, hardpack dirt paths, etc. I ended up with size 25 road tires on mine, and did 3 centures and about 4,000 miles before getting my road bike. Then I loaned it to my brother, who used it for about 6 months, got hooked on cycling and bought a road bike. The hybrid is currently with my brother's friend, so it is responsible for getting 3 of us hooked on cycling. The only reason I got rid of the hybrid is my wife was starting to count bikes in the garage, and something had to go!

    The reason I'm sharing this is I agree with the advice above. Get the bike you have tuned up, and ride it, ride it, ride it. Get some decent bike shorts, I prefer the bibs, and a couple jerseys. They wick sweat really well, and the pockets in the back are super handy to have.

    Keep us updated on how you are doing. You will find the Clyde forum very helpful with anything you need.

  19. #19
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    One more question before I go to the bike shop. What is a reasonable price to pay for a tune-up.

  20. #20
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chadlay View Post
    One more question before I go to the bike shop. What is a reasonable price to pay for a tune-up.
    Depends on what they do. My shop charges between 25 and 60 depending what they are doing.

    Any chance you do can do some of it yourself? Or you know a friend into bikes who could do it?

  21. #21
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chadlay View Post
    @ the historian I shall take your advice! Might as well fix up this hybrid a bit and get comfortable with it. I have ridden it recently and it has a really smooth ride and feels very stable. (chromoly body)
    It's the motor, not the machine. Remember that.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Historian View Post
    Depends on what they do. My shop charges between 25 and 60 depending what they are doing.

    Any chance you do can do some of it yourself? Or you know a friend into bikes who could do it?
    Nobody I know is into cycling so thats out. I was thinking about getting my first tune up done at the shop. I plan on picking up a toolkit and a bike maintenance book or something along those lines. Figure learning it myself would help me if any thing comes up while I am on the road.

  23. #23
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chadlay View Post
    Nobody I know is into cycling so thats out. I was thinking about getting my first tune up done at the shop. I plan on picking up a toolkit and a bike maintenance book or something along those lines. Figure learning it myself would help me if any thing comes up while I am on the road.
    Good idea. At the minimum have stuff to fix a flat.

  24. #24
    Senior Member iforgotmename's Avatar
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    Around here they run about $60. After your initial tune up educate yourself a little about basic maintanance as it will save you some $$$ and hassles in the long run.
    Good luck and it looks like you have all the right advice.

  25. #25
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    I've seen tune ups run between a basic $40 quick tune and $125 overhaul. On the 125 tune up you also got new brake pads and bar tape on top of everything being stripped down to the frame, waxed, polished, and fully tuned. Basically your bike was brand new when you got it back.

    Course your final bill will all depend on what parts, if any, need replaced. Just ask that if anything is questionable or needs replaced that they call you for confirmation. That way you don't end up a surprise bill.

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