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  1. #1
    Senior Member timmythology's Avatar
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    kinda long personal question

    So in 2005 I was given a Raleigh M80 MTB "bike", and it was my only bike until 2009. That is when the best wife in the world worked me into a road bike. I have used bike primarily for commuting, errands, and recreational rides up to 65 miles. I used to especially enjoy riding it around because it was converted to an upright ride. Recently I have enjoined riding it less for several reasons. Besides the old suspension fork, or the up right ride position is the heel strike issue with panniers. So now i have come to my first bike delimma, which is n+1, or re-outfit bike for another purpose.

    First I am truly tried of lugging a suspension fork around, and I have started to like overnight bike trips, my next trip being on spring break . So i have thought about changing forks. If I change forks I need to get it new so it is has an uncut stem. Which would than create a change of handlebars, and so on with that process of change. Since I would convert it over to a drop bar bike.

    Second, I am hesitating because bike has heel strike--very pronounced on the left side--especially if I am loaded for an overnight trip. Which also introduces my short chubby legs, and wanting a step through tour/trekking bike, so that I don't have to stand on something to get my leg over the rear when loaded. With the issue of step over, and heel strike with my frame I am considering putting bike out to pasture and getting a new frame to build up.

    Which means moving on from bike. He has already been moved to the basement since I am just doing recreational rides at this point. I am bored using my road bike "zippy" for commuting, errands, and running around town. An obvious reason is security differences, zippy is never out of my site, which removes errands, school, running around as options for his use. So I like having a city bike, that I can just lock and go with. Like Bike!

    So NOW I am thinking about just giving up with refitting Bike, and replacing him with a new touring bike. Which is not going to be an easy sell to the best wife ever, since she still scratches her head that I don't just ride zippy. So than to make it more practical I would have to pick up a frame, and part down Bike, to make a new bike. I learned with zippy that buying a bike is not always the best for me personally. While I currently know squat about bike mechanics, I can learn some to reduce the labor cost.

    So trying to figure out if I should just refit the old, or try and find the new?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Randonneur in Training B.Alive's Avatar
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    There are a lot of touring bikes already built. Have you thought about going that rout?
    ---
    Ride on,
    Brad

    2010 Jamis Coda Sport

    My first bike tour could be this fall! Pittsburgh to DC October 2011???

  3. #3
    Senior Member late's Avatar
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    1) I have really short legs for my size. What you want is called a compact frame.
    That just means the top tube slopes down which makes it easier to get on and off.
    You don't have to do that, but it does making getting on and off easier.
    Personally, I've never had one.

    2) Stretch after your rides. The one I do the most is to put a foot on the kitchen counter and do
    a sprinter's stretch. You lower your torso down a bit to stretch the hips. Be gentle, and take some time.

    3) Do your knees wobble? If they do, you may want these Pedal Spacers.
    http://www.bikefit.com/products.php

    4) If your legs are really short you may want shorter cranks. How tall are you, and what is your inseam.
    We are as gods, we might as well get good at it.
    Stewart Brand

  4. #4
    Senior Member Spudd's Avatar
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    It sounds like quite an endeavor to refit Bike. New fork, new stem, new handlebars. There's not much you can do to alleviate the heel strike problem at all, and if you really want to tour, that's a big issue. I think if I were you, I'd go for N+1 instead of trying to mold a pig's ear into a silk purse. You can sell Bike to recoup some of your costs. You could also look on the used market instead of buying a new bike if you are worried about the finances end of things.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timmythology View Post
    So in 2005 I was given a Raleigh M80 MTB "bike", and it was my only bike until 2009. That is when the best wife in the world worked me into a road bike. I have used bike primarily for commuting, errands, and recreational rides up to 65 miles. I used to especially enjoy riding it around because it was converted to an upright ride. Recently I have enjoined riding it less for several reasons. Besides the old suspension fork, or the up right ride position is the heel strike issue with panniers. So now i have come to my first bike delimma, which is n+1, or re-outfit bike for another purpose.

    First I am truly tried of lugging a suspension fork around, and I have started to like overnight bike trips, my next trip being on spring break . So i have thought about changing forks. If I change forks I need to get it new so it is has an uncut stem. Which would than create a change of handlebars, and so on with that process of change. Since I would convert it over to a drop bar bike.

    Second, I am hesitating because bike has heel strike--very pronounced on the left side--especially if I am loaded for an overnight trip. Which also introduces my short chubby legs, and wanting a step through tour/trekking bike, so that I don't have to stand on something to get my leg over the rear when loaded. With the issue of step over, and heel strike with my frame I am considering putting bike out to pasture and getting a new frame to build up.

    Which means moving on from bike. He has already been moved to the basement since I am just doing recreational rides at this point. I am bored using my road bike "zippy" for commuting, errands, and running around town. An obvious reason is security differences, zippy is never out of my site, which removes errands, school, running around as options for his use. So I like having a city bike, that I can just lock and go with. Like Bike!

    So NOW I am thinking about just giving up with refitting Bike, and replacing him with a new touring bike. Which is not going to be an easy sell to the best wife ever, since she still scratches her head that I don't just ride zippy. So than to make it more practical I would have to pick up a frame, and part down Bike, to make a new bike. I learned with zippy that buying a bike is not always the best for me personally. While I currently know squat about bike mechanics, I can learn some to reduce the labor cost.

    So trying to figure out if I should just refit the old, or try and find the new?

    Thanks
    There are a couple of routes to take:

    The problem with conversions is that you can spend a lot of money on a bike that isn't really worth the investment, by the time you buy bars, levers, shifters, fork, possibly some chain-rings and a new cassette you could be down $200 - $250, now if your counting on your LBS to do the labour, you could be almost to a lower end road bike and would still have the heel strike problem - mountain bikes tend to have short stays due to the fact they don't need longer stays. What you may find preferable is to look for a pre-owned bicycle that fits and is most of the way toward what you need, drop bars and long stays.

  6. #6
    Senior Member timmythology's Avatar
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    Good Morning

    Spudd: I know you are right, it's just going to be hard to break up with that first bike, but like pants, I guess you just grow out them.
    I have been watching craigslist for used, but Portland can be a tough market for craigslist.

    B.Alive: The problem I have with buying new, is I tend just to upgrade right out of the box, at which point buying a bunch of stuff I am going to replace, seems like a bad idea. Plus i have been collecting stuff anyway in a parts been.

    Late: both my bikes fit me, physically, but Bike no longer fits it needs. And I am having pre-purchase remorse

    Well off to school for a math quiz.

  7. #7
    2nd Amendment Cyclist RichardGlover's Avatar
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    Can Zippy be retrofitted with racks and panniers for commuting and/or touring?

    If so, Bike may be able to be kept as a winter beater/commuter (use a rear rack with a top bag, but no panniers to avoid heel strike).

    If not, then it may be time to sell Bike to help justify the cost of a used or new touring bike. If you can deal with only having Zippy for a while, you could even sell Bike to finance a frame, then spend time building it up, spreading the cost of the components you'd still need over the course of several months. That might be easier to budget.
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