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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 02-22-11, 07:14 PM   #1
jleiwig
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Bought a bike

It's a 1997 Specialized Hardrock. Missing a saddle and post. Decent condition for a 14 year old bike. Has Kenda Kwick Cross tires on it that are brand new.

Anyone got a specialized saddle and post they wanna part with for cheap?

Gonna clean it up real good and lube everything. Will probably take the wheels in to be trued and tensioned if it doesn't cost too much. I think it'll do till I save up to buy a new bike. That's my sub 300 lb goal and present to myself, a brand new off the rack bike.

I'll get pictures up later..wifey has the camera with her.
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Old 02-22-11, 07:18 PM   #2
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No parts to offer, but congrats on the new ride
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Old 02-22-11, 07:23 PM   #3
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Congrats and welcome! Find a saddle that fits (don't be fooled by soft, squishy saddles, they only feel good for a very short time - get a firm place to park your sit bones) and you'll need a seat post that fits the frame (probably best to let the LBS figure the size you need). Then get out and ride.
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Old 02-22-11, 09:31 PM   #4
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Congrats!! Enjoy the new ride!!!
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Old 02-23-11, 07:50 AM   #5
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Congratulations!
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Old 02-23-11, 09:25 AM   #6
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Thanks everyone. Hopefully it will work out as a short term solution. Obviously not having a seat post, I couldn't ride it, but I did spin the crank and shift the gears and such and it seems ok. There is a bit of side to side wobble on the rear tire when spinning, but it's not visably bent anywhere. I took the front and rear wheels off last night and started cleaning them thoroughly. I'll probably run down to the LBS to pick up some lube, and maybe a couple tools to strip it down further for cleaning and lubing. Depends on how much it is, because the shop is offering a special for $109.99 for a complete overhaul. Not sure what that involves.
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Old 02-23-11, 10:38 AM   #7
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Here is a link to that bike on bikepedia

1997 Specialized Hardrock

Make sure that you get the right size seat post. the above site has it listed as a 26.2 mm, measure the inside of your seat tube with some calipers to make sure. Don't try to jam the wrong size in there or you'll be in real trouble. The 26.2 mm seat posts should be fairly cheap on ebay since they are not a popular size right now. I would look for one of the Kalloy ones that aren't too expensive. Also since it is a mountain bike I would get a seat post that is 350mm or longer

For the overhaul, at $109.99, I would as questions like what do they do and what parts does it include? like new cables and housings, brake pads.

Do you know anything about bike mechanics?

I prefer to buy a mini tool and any specialized tools and do the overhaul myself. There is a lot of information on Sheldon Brown's site and Park tools site on how to do bike maintenance. Also look at the wheel wobble, this can be cause by an untrue wheel or a rear hub that is too loose.
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Old 02-23-11, 01:53 PM   #8
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Here is a link to that bike on bikepedia

1997 Specialized Hardrock

Make sure that you get the right size seat post. the above site has it listed as a 26.2 mm, measure the inside of your seat tube with some calipers to make sure. Don't try to jam the wrong size in there or you'll be in real trouble. The 26.2 mm seat posts should be fairly cheap on ebay since they are not a popular size right now. I would look for one of the Kalloy ones that aren't too expensive. Also since it is a mountain bike I would get a seat post that is 350mm or longer

For the overhaul, at $109.99, I would as questions like what do they do and what parts does it include? like new cables and housings, brake pads.

Do you know anything about bike mechanics?

I prefer to buy a mini tool and any specialized tools and do the overhaul myself. There is a lot of information on Sheldon Brown's site and Park tools site on how to do bike maintenance. Also look at the wheel wobble, this can be cause by an untrue wheel or a rear hub that is too loose.
Yes, I've been watching ebay for seat posts. I do plan on doing my own wrenching. I've got a couple books waiting for pick up at the library and if I like them, then I will check the used book store or order them off of Amazon for keeps.

Unforunately someone had had a smaller seat post in in previously that took me all night to get out. It was wrapped with about 1/4" thick layer of hockey tape, about 6" along the shaft. I do plan on measuring it when I get home and only buying the proper diameter seat post.

Also I've been looking at tool kits. Is it better to buy the bike specific tools one by one or in a kit? I imagine the kit is cheaper overall, but the quality probably isn't that high? Should I stick with Park branded tools or are off brands ok?

I'm going to have to inspect the bike carefully because I believe it is a frankenstein of different parts. I know the front and rear wheels are different. the front is the factory rim, but the rear appears to be a different model Alex rim as far as I can tell. I don't want to buy tools based on what came from the factory only to find they aren't what I need since the guy put something different on the bike.

I plan on going through the bike with a fine tooth comb over the next few weeks since the weather doesn't appear to be cooperating with bike riding anyway. There isn't going to be a rush to get it on the road unless it magically bumps up to mid 60s in the next week or two.
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Old 02-23-11, 03:45 PM   #9
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Yes, I've been watching ebay for seat posts. I do plan on doing my own wrenching. I've got a couple books waiting for pick up at the library and if I like them, then I will check the used book store or order them off of Amazon for keeps.

Unforunately someone had had a smaller seat post in in previously that took me all night to get out. It was wrapped with about 1/4" thick layer of hockey tape, about 6" along the shaft. I do plan on measuring it when I get home and only buying the proper diameter seat post.

Also I've been looking at tool kits. Is it better to buy the bike specific tools one by one or in a kit? I imagine the kit is cheaper overall, but the quality probably isn't that high? Should I stick with Park branded tools or are off brands ok?

I'm going to have to inspect the bike carefully because I believe it is a frankenstein of different parts. I know the front and rear wheels are different. the front is the factory rim, but the rear appears to be a different model Alex rim as far as I can tell. I don't want to buy tools based on what came from the factory only to find they aren't what I need since the guy put something different on the bike.

I plan on going through the bike with a fine tooth comb over the next few weeks since the weather doesn't appear to be cooperating with bike riding anyway. There isn't going to be a rush to get it on the road unless it magically bumps up to mid 60s in the next week or two.
For tools, tools are divided into 2 types, good ones and garbage ones, kits are often lower quality tools and many of them may never be used. The ones you do use are often not of a good equality so you end up replacing them fairly quickly. However some tools are expensive and not used often, so you need to consider the payback period on the tool, if it's more then 5 years, I don't bother. In other words if the number of times the job is done over 5 years costs less then the tool, I get the shop to do it.

Here is an example, getting a headset installed, I need the bicycle in order to know which part is needed, if they charge $10 to press one in, and I only get one installed every 6-7 years, and the tool costs $50 then it will take 30-35 15 years to pay for the cost of the tool, that's not worth it, for me. Park tools tend to be quite good, that's why bike shops use them, however sometimes the part maker sells a tool for installing or removing a certain part, and that will generally work better then a generic tool. For example I have a Suntour branded freewheel remover for a Suntour freewheel that is on the one bike.
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Old 02-23-11, 04:50 PM   #10
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Also I've been looking at tool kits. Is it better to buy the bike specific tools one by one or in a kit? I imagine the kit is cheaper overall, but the quality probably isn't that high? Should I stick with Park branded tools or are off brands ok?
Most people recommend that you buy bike tools as you need them.

Lets look at a decent tool kit the Park tool AK-37.

Contents of the AK-37:


AWS-1 4, 5, 6mm Hex Wrench Set
AWS-3 2, 2.5, 3mm Y Hex Wrench Set
BBT-5/FR-11 Bottom Bracket and Freehub Lockring tool for CampagnoloŽ not needed if you hav shimano parts
BBT-9 Bottom Bracket for 16 notch external crankset system cups do you know if this fits your bottom bracket
BBT-22 Cartridge Bottom Bracket Tool (for 20 tooth internal splines, such as ShimanoŽ, FSAŽ, etc.) Will this fit your bottom bracket
CC-3 Chain Checker Chain Wear Indicator
CWP-7 Crank Puller for Splined Octalink⪚, ISIS DriveŽ, and square-taper type this is fine unless you have a campy ultra drive crankset
CCW-5 Crank Wrench with 14mm Socket / 8mm Hex
CBW-1 8 and 10mm Open End Wrench
CBW-4 9 and 11mm Open End Wrench CL-1 Synthetic Blend Clain Lube
CM-5 Cyclone Chain Cleaner
CN-10 Cable Cutter
CNW-2 Chainring Nut Wrench rarely used
CT-3 Professional Screw Type Chain Tool
FR-5 Cassette Lockring Tool for ShimanoŽ and similar brands only good if yours is shimano or compatible
GP-2 Pre-Glued Patch Kit these don't work well for most people
GSC-1 GearClean Brush
PPL-1 PolyLube 1000 Grease
PW-3 Professional Pedal Wrench
SCW-13 13mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench why so many cone wrenches typically you only need 2 sizes
SCW-14 14mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-15 15mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-16 16mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-17 17mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-18 18mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SCW-19 19mm Professional Shop Cone Wrench
SD-0 Shop Screwdriver #0 Phillips You probably already have screwdrivers
SD-3 Shop Screwdriver Straight Blade, 3mm tip
SD-2 Shop Screwdriver #2 Phillips
SD-6 Shop Screwdriver Straight Blade, 6mm tip
SR-11 Chain Whip and Freewheel/Lockring Wrench
SW-0 Professional Spoke Wrench You probably only need one size of spoke wrench
SW-1 Professional Spoke Wrench
SW-2 Professional Spoke Wrench
TB-2 Tire Boot
TL-1Tire Levers


This is a good beginner set but there are a lot of tools that you will never need or use unless you have many different bikes. I prefer to buy tools as I need them and get the proper fitting tool. That is the more expensive way to go but it is cheaper since I don't get a bunch of tools that I don't need.

Wogstera is very correct about the payback on the tool use. Some tools are just too expensive and these you are likely to use once or twice.

Headtube facing tool,
bottom bracket facing tool
frame alignment tools

I do recommend a derailleur hanger alignment tool since the derailleur alignment is critical in shifter performance.

Well, I babbling on here.
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Old 02-23-11, 06:10 PM   #11
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Looking at that bikepedia page and looking at my bike and comparing, I'm going to change my mind and decide it's a 1998 based on the components still on the bike. I measured the seatpost at 1.189" which equates to a 30.2 seatpost, but the bikepedia says 30.4...hmmm that's only 7 thou difference in imperial measurements. I ended up purchasing a 30.2x400 mm rockwerks alloy post on ebay for 4.99 plus shipping just now, so hopefully that works out!

The rims do need truing, but I'm not sure if that's an immediate thing? or can it wait?
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Old 02-23-11, 06:17 PM   #12
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The rims do need truing, but I'm not sure if that's an immediate thing? or can it wait?
Do the rims rub on the brake pads? If they do than you need to get the wheel trued. squeeze two spokes at a time around the whole wheel do any of the spokes feel loose? are any broken? if yes then you need some work on your wheels. If you answered no to any of those questions then you are probably fine for now.

Remember this is free advice on something I have never seen, so it is worth what you are paying.

Also since you are posting mechanical questions, you would get a lot better answers on the mechanics forum.
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Old 02-23-11, 06:45 PM   #13
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With the wobble on the rear of the wheel, they are probably going to need to be trued.
Is this part of the cost of the tune up?

Get the wheels trued now and it will save you a lot of headaches with broken spokes and brake adjustment in the future.

Also, I would suggest that you make up your own tool kit. Unless you pay a lot for a kit, the quality of the tools will vary. Some tools must be high quality, some tools it is less important.

To begin with, I would suggest a good ball-top hex key set and a set of metric wrenches. This will help a lot with beginning wrenching. Then add bike tools after that. A good bicycle mechanics class is a must.
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Old 02-23-11, 06:54 PM   #14
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With the wobble on the rear of the wheel, they are probably going to need to be trued.
Is this part of the cost of the tune up?

Get the wheels trued now and it will save you a lot of headaches with broken spokes and brake adjustment in the future.

Also, I would suggest that you make up your own tool kit. Unless you pay a lot for a kit, the quality of the tools will vary. Some tools must be high quality, some tools it is less important.

To begin with, I would suggest a good ball-top hex key set and a set of metric wrenches. This will help a lot with beginning wrenching. Then add bike tools after that. A good bicycle mechanics class is a must.
The rear rim comes close to rubbing the pads, so that's a more than likely candidate for truing, the front doesn't wobble as much, so maybe it can wait if they want an arm and a leg.

I'm not sure what the tune-up/overhaul includes, but I'm going to call tomorrow and find out.

I have basic tools covered, just specialized bike tools would be all I need to buy.
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Old 02-24-11, 12:30 AM   #15
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I'm not sure what the tune-up/overhaul includes, but I'm going to call tomorrow and find out.
YMMV, but here's what my LBS does. I think this is fairly typical for a tune-up vs. an overhaul:

Tune-Up
  • Adjust derailleurs & cables
  • Adjust brakes, pads, 7 cables
  • Adjust hubs, true & tension spokes
  • Adjust headset
  • Adjust bottom bracket

Complete Overhaul
  • complete disassembly, cleaning, & rebuilding of all systems on the bicycle

$110 is a very good price if they're actually doing a complete overhaul.
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Old 02-24-11, 05:55 AM   #16
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YMMV, but here's what my LBS does. I think this is fairly typical for a tune-up vs. an overhaul:

Tune-Up
  • Adjust derailleurs & cables
  • Adjust brakes, pads, 7 cables
  • Adjust hubs, true & tension spokes
  • Adjust headset
  • Adjust bottom bracket

Complete Overhaul
  • complete disassembly, cleaning, & rebuilding of all systems on the bicycle

$110 is a very good price if they're actually doing a complete overhaul.
If that's what they will do, then I agree. It's on sale for this month due to the weather. Normally $159 bucks.
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