Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33
  1. #1
    DAS UBER CLYDE
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    South Western Ohio
    My Bikes
    Still Looking
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Tune Up or Overhaul?

    My SLBS is having a sale now through March 15th on Tune Ups and Overhauls

    According to them, the tune-up vs. an overhaul looks like this:

    Tune-Up $49.99

    •Adjust derailleurs & cables
    •Adjust brakes, pads, & cables
    •Adjust hubs, true & tension spokes
    •Adjust headset
    •Adjust bottom bracket
    •Lube everything
    •Basic cleaning


    Complete Overhaul $109.99 Labor plus parts

    •Completely remove everything down to bare frame
    •Everything above in the Tune-Up
    •Replace all cables and pads with new

    Just truing a wheel is $15-20 per wheel, which would seem to indicate that the Tune-Up is a good deal.

    I should mention that my goal is to ride this bike for this "season" and then look at buying a new bike on end of year close out (I should be at a more reasonable weight by then so I can get a road bike). I'll probably sell the bike at the end of season, and I don't see myself getting back the Overhaul price + parts when I'm done with the bike. That would probably put me over $200 total into this bike, and you can get a brand new bike for $279 at the LBS anytime.

    Which would you recommend and why? Remember this is a 13 year old Specialized mountain bike which seems to me to have little to no maintenance done on it over it's lifetime. Of course then again, I'm not sure what's original and what is not as quite a few of the parts don't match.

    I'm really quite torn as to which way to go. I know either way I probably won't get all my money back when I sell the bike, but I'd like to get most of it back as either one is a value added operation.

    The other option to consider I guess would be if I could buy the specific bike tools I would need and replacement parts for less than the cost of the overhaul and do it myself? I'm not afraid to rip into it, because I'm very mechanically versed, just not sure I could do it for less than what the LBS charges.

    Sorry for rambling, but weighing my options is making my head hurt!
    A ways away from thoroughbred, but I'll get there!

  2. #2
    Senior Member snowman40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    My Bikes
    Fuji
    Posts
    1,135
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd go overhaul since you are looking at selling it.

    I would think it would be easier to sell if you are able to advertise that it was overhauled in the spring.
    Quote Originally Posted by snowman40
    If you must speed up to pass me, you don't deserve to pass me
    Quote Originally Posted by abstractform20 View Post
    farts are greatly appreciated as long as the other riders are talented and experienced. at the precise moment of release, a vacuum is formed. this is the optimal time for the rider behind you to get as aero as possible and "ride the brown rhino". his face should be within 2-3mm of the anus to receive maximum benefit (reduced drag...duh, its in a vacuum). i have hit speeds of over 53mph in such conditions.

  3. #3
    Senior Member JohnA42's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If the bike looks like it hasn't been well maintained then I'd go for the overhaul. $110 is an excellent price. (Regular price in this market is about twice that.)

    You probably won't get your money back on selling it, true. A couple things to consider.

    1) You could keep the bike and use it for rainy days, commuting, etc. N+1... it's a way of life.

    2) The overhaul should provide you some peace of mind. What's that worth in $$$? Factor that into your resale equation.

    3) Your overhauled $200 bike is probably worth more than that $279 LBS special.

  4. #4
    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Oxnard, CA
    My Bikes
    '08 Fuji Roubaix RC; '07 Schwinn Le Tour GS; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX
    Posts
    4,445
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Agree with going for the overhaul and strongly agree with keeping the bike as a back up. One bike is never enough.

  5. #5
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I'd pass on all of it and keep the bike as a back up. Is the BB moving side to side? Are the wheels crooked? an you move the headset bt rocking back and forth onteh bike?

    If not, you're basically paying the shop $50 to squirt lube on the cables, chain and derailluers. Heck find a freind that can adjust the derailleurs for you. I have for several buddies, takes about 30 seconds.

    BTW, what is a reasonable weight for a roadbike? I know lots of big riders on roadies. If went by what others said, I would have had to give up bikes when I was 12 years old.

  6. #6
    Senior Member rdtompki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Hollister, CA
    My Bikes
    Volagi, daVinci Joint Venture
    Posts
    3,944
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If everything is working and you ride in the hills and the bike has not necessarily been well maintained - I might just change out the brake cables and pads if they are old. Brakes and tires are the two things you need the most on a downhill. The other stuff tends to make itself known when its time is up.
    Rick T
    --------
    Volagi - Triple"ized" and Tubeless
    daVinci Joint Venture

  7. #7
    DAS UBER CLYDE
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    South Western Ohio
    My Bikes
    Still Looking
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    BTW, what is a reasonable weight for a roadbike? I know lots of big riders on roadies. If went by what others said, I would have had to give up bikes when I was 12 years old.
    Well currently at a little over 350 lbs, I don't think that a true road bike would A) be very comfortable B) hold up my big butt!
    A ways away from thoroughbred, but I'll get there!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
    My Bikes
    Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
    Posts
    6,942
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jleiwig View Post
    My SLBS is having a sale now through March 15th on Tune Ups and Overhauls

    According to them, the tune-up vs. an overhaul looks like this:

    Tune-Up $49.99

    •Adjust derailleurs & cables
    •Adjust brakes, pads, & cables
    •Adjust hubs, true & tension spokes
    •Adjust headset
    •Adjust bottom bracket
    •Lube everything
    •Basic cleaning


    Complete Overhaul $109.99 Labor plus parts

    •Completely remove everything down to bare frame
    •Everything above in the Tune-Up
    •Replace all cables and pads with new

    Just truing a wheel is $15-20 per wheel, which would seem to indicate that the Tune-Up is a good deal.

    I should mention that my goal is to ride this bike for this "season" and then look at buying a new bike on end of year close out (I should be at a more reasonable weight by then so I can get a road bike). I'll probably sell the bike at the end of season, and I don't see myself getting back the Overhaul price + parts when I'm done with the bike. That would probably put me over $200 total into this bike, and you can get a brand new bike for $279 at the LBS anytime.

    Which would you recommend and why? Remember this is a 13 year old Specialized mountain bike which seems to me to have little to no maintenance done on it over it's lifetime. Of course then again, I'm not sure what's original and what is not as quite a few of the parts don't match.

    I'm really quite torn as to which way to go. I know either way I probably won't get all my money back when I sell the bike, but I'd like to get most of it back as either one is a value added operation.

    The other option to consider I guess would be if I could buy the specific bike tools I would need and replacement parts for less than the cost of the overhaul and do it myself? I'm not afraid to rip into it, because I'm very mechanically versed, just not sure I could do it for less than what the LBS charges.

    Sorry for rambling, but weighing my options is making my head hurt!
    There isn't really a lot that is complex on a bicycle, all the mechanical bits, with the exceptions of bearings and races is hanging out there for all to see. Go to the local library, have a look at some bicycle repair books and see if it looks like something you can handle. If it is, buy a book and the tools you need for the job, and go at it. Other then a bottom bracket tool, crank puller, chain whip, cassette/freewheel tool, chain breaker, pedal wrench and a cone wrench, there isn't really a lot of tools you need that you don't already have.

    The bottom bracket tool, cassette/freewheel tool and cone wrench, may be different for different brands..... For a Specialized of that vintage it's likely all Shimano and if it's 6 cogs in the back it's likely a freewheel, 8 or more and it's likely cassette, 7 is iffy... I'm not that mechanical and I keep all the bikes here running nicely, so it's not that hard.....

  9. #9
    Senior Member jr59's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    the 904, Jax fl
    Posts
    2,184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    I'd pass on all of it and keep the bike as a back up. Is the BB moving side to side? Are the wheels crooked? an you move the headset bt rocking back and forth onteh bike?

    If not, you're basically paying the shop $50 to squirt lube on the cables, chain and derailluers. Heck find a freind that can adjust the derailleurs for you. I have for several buddies, takes about 30 seconds.

    BTW, what is a reasonable weight for a roadbike? I know lots of big riders on roadies. If went by what others said, I would have had to give up bikes when I was 12 years old.
    ^^THIS^^

    You can learn to adjust derailuers on you tube!
    Gravity hates us all, but it hates me more than thin people!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
    My Bikes
    Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
    Posts
    6,942
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jleiwig View Post
    Well currently at a little over 350 lbs, I don't think that a true road bike would A) be very comfortable B) hold up my big butt!
    Road bikes are a lot tougher then they look, some would argue that an older style road bike with the horizontal top tube, is stronger then many of the modern mountain bikes which have the sloping top tube which is closer to the traditional women's design.

  11. #11
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jleiwig View Post
    Well currently at a little over 350 lbs, I don't think that a true road bike would A) be very comfortable B) hold up my big butt!
    That is quite a bit but I do know guys at about 270 the ride roadies no problem. As far as holdingup, I think they would with a good wheel. I have Velocity Deep V's on our tandem supporting 400+lbs. I'd say 36 spoke V's would hold you. There is some good stuff out there!

  12. #12
    working on progress treebound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    most have two wheels, but some have one or three
    Posts
    2,751
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My thoughts align with others above.

    Do your own tune-up at home since you're mechanically adept. Use the money saved to buy tools or road-style tires, assuming the MTB still has knobbies or dual-use tires.

    Used prices on MTB's (at least around here) are so bad you will never get your money back. Keep the MTB and set it up as a commuter and winter bike.

    ParkTool has a nice do it yourself section, as does SheldonBrown.com.

  13. #13
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mattoon,Ill
    My Bikes
    Trek 7300 Giant Sedona E-Bike Trek Madone 4.5 Surly Cross Check
    Posts
    1,977
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I say do it yourself if you enjoy learning about mechanical stuff. Start out by detail cleaning the bike in a well lit area. Get a book like one of Zinn's Art of bicycle maintance. Identify the parts. Do you have a threadless head, a freewheel or cassette, model of deraileurs, center pull brakes ect... Remember the the prices quoted are the minimum. If they put new parts on the bike you'll have to pay whatever they charge for them. We'll still be here and so will the Mechanic's Forum to confuse you further. The Oh... that's what they were talking about. Is so cool.

    My first tip. Brake cleaner is great to clean non-painted surfaces. Apply to rag. Do not get into bearings until you know how to rebuild them.

    I saw the Park Tool and Sheldon Brown Post they're great. I like having a book right next to the bike also.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    northern Deep South
    My Bikes
    Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee
    Posts
    1,830
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'll go against the flow on this one. Since OP asked which of the two, I'm thinking he'll let the shop do the work. After 13 years, I think there's a lot of things in there that used to be lubricated that have likely dried up, like headset, bottom bracket, and wheel bearings. If cables aren't rusted, housing is dry anyhow. Derailer pivots are probably dry if nobody's lubed them in the last 4-5 years.

    Do the overhaul. Think of it as a new, $110 bike. If you only ride it for a year before you trade, sell it for $100 and it cost you $10 to ride a lubed, trued, adjusted bike for one year.

    If it's not worth that, why are you even thinking about riding a bike?

  15. #15
    Senior Member exile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    My Bikes
    2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker, 1999 Jamis Exile
    Posts
    2,849
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are inclined a lot of stuff you can do (or learn how to online). For things like BB, pedals, and spokes you might need special tools, but that's about it.

    If you do decide to do anything just keep the receipt and use it as a selling point when the time comes.
    lil brown bat wrote:
    Wow, aren't other people stupid? It's a good thing that we're so smart. Yay us.

  16. #16
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mattoon,Ill
    My Bikes
    Trek 7300 Giant Sedona E-Bike Trek Madone 4.5 Surly Cross Check
    Posts
    1,977
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just had another pro DIY thought. What you learn about this bike will help you when you go to buy a new one.

  17. #17
    Senior Member RunningPirate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Millbrae, CA
    My Bikes
    1970? Dawes Galaxy, 1992 Biscayne Lazer, 1999 Specialized FSR Elite, 2011 Raleigh Record Ace
    Posts
    579
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wogsterca View Post
    There isn't really a lot that is complex on a bicycle, all the mechanical bits, with the exceptions of bearings and races is hanging out there for all to see. Go to the local library, have a look at some bicycle repair books and see if it looks like something you can handle. If it is, buy a book and the tools you need for the job, and go at it. Other then a bottom bracket tool, crank puller, chain whip, cassette/freewheel tool, chain breaker, pedal wrench and a cone wrench, there isn't really a lot of tools you need that you don't already have.
    +1 on the DIY. It will be more $$ on the outset, but you get to use the tools and knowledge over and over (...and over and over, sometimes) throughout the years. Also, there's that cool "I can handle this" feeling you get when something breaks.

    In addition to the tools listed above, I'm going to add a bike stand. Makes it exponentially easier to wrench when the bike is being held up for you.

    In addition to Sheldon Brown and Park Tool websites, check out http://www.bicycletutor.com - I used this a lot when I [recently] taught myself how to wrench.

    I'm also going to +1 on keeping your current bike (along with getting a new one). Let it be your experimentation/beater/commuter/bar bike.

    All that said - if you don't want to hassle with all this, then go for the overhaul.
    There's nothing for you to see here...just move along, now...

  18. #18
    DAS UBER CLYDE
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    South Western Ohio
    My Bikes
    Still Looking
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As I said previously I'm not opposed to doing it myself, I do all my own car and truck maintenance so it's no problem what so ever. I stopped at the library today and got three different maintenance books.

    My main fear as someone alluded to above is that when I take it to the shop to have it tuned up that they will come out with a bill or a list of everything that needs replaced that will cost me $400 or more. Then I'm out the original $50 I paid for the bike, and now another $50 only to learn that by the time I'm done I'll have $500 in a 13 year old bike.

    I think I'm going to start with building a wheel truing stand, since I have most of the stuff around anyway, and then buy the spoke wrench set from Performance Bike for 11.99. That will at least get my rims true with some patience and a good set of instructions. I've found quite a few on the web.

    That will be a start, and with some careful lubing, cleaning and such I'll put the bike on the road for a test ride. If it works great, if not, I'll repair and replace things one by one with an eye toward something that is forward compatible should I choose to just buy a frame for my next bike.

    Thanks everyone.
    A ways away from thoroughbred, but I'll get there!

  19. #19
    DAS UBER CLYDE
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    South Western Ohio
    My Bikes
    Still Looking
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    That is quite a bit but I do know guys at about 270 the ride roadies no problem. As far as holdingup, I think they would with a good wheel. I have Velocity Deep V's on our tandem supporting 400+lbs. I'd say 36 spoke V's would hold you. There is some good stuff out there!
    While I agree generally that it would probably hold up, currently it's more a motivation tool than anything else. It's my reward for getting to a number where there is a 2 in front.
    A ways away from thoroughbred, but I'll get there!

  20. #20
    Senior Member JohnA42's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jleiwig View Post
    My main fear as someone alluded to above is that when I take it to the shop to have it tuned up that they will come out with a bill or a list of everything that needs replaced that will cost me $400 or more. Then I'm out the original $50 I paid for the bike, and now another $50 only to learn that by the time I'm done I'll have $500 in a 13 year old bike.
    Most places will give you an estimate for free.

    Seriously, whatever you do -- tune-up, overhaul, DIY -- make sure that you check the brake pads, cables, etc.

  21. #21
    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Oxnard, CA
    My Bikes
    '08 Fuji Roubaix RC; '07 Schwinn Le Tour GS; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX
    Posts
    4,445
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm changing my vote from overhaul to DIY (missed that it was an option).

    When I got back into cycling 3 1/2 years ago, it was on an '86 Diamond Back Ascent bought for $40 off CL. It was a bit of a mess but I tore into it and it came out really nice. Replaced the tires, brake pads, saddle and grips plus did a lot of cleaning, lubing and adjusting. Rode it for 1K miles before getting an old Schwinn road bike and, after major renovation on it (it was a dumpster find), discovering how awesome road bikes are.

    I've accumulated a pretty good tool kit picking up one tool at a time as I needed them. Performance has some nice tools at really good prices (especially if you catch them on sale) and there won't be too many you'll need right off the bat as you already have the basic tools.

    As others mentioned, this will be your learning bike so why not learn to wrench?

  22. #22
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    My experience is....if you take an old wheel into a shop, they mess with it, it's going to break! If the wheels are fairly straight, it's better to leave it alone at this stage. If you take it in, a spoke could break during the adjustment. Then you won't have a choice but to buy a new wheel cause the shop won't want to deal with it after that. If anything, take the money and put it towards a new rear wheel then keep the bike as a wrencher.

  23. #23
    DAS UBER CLYDE
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    South Western Ohio
    My Bikes
    Still Looking
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz View Post
    My experience is....if you take an old wheel into a shop, they mess with it, it's going to break! If the wheels are fairly straight, it's better to leave it alone at this stage. If you take it in, a spoke could break during the adjustment. Then you won't have a choice but to buy a new wheel cause the shop won't want to deal with it after that. If anything, take the money and put it towards a new rear wheel then keep the bike as a wrencher.
    But what if I mess with it myself Beanz? If I break a spoke then I replace it. No big deal right since I'm doing my own wrenching?

    BTW. Got pretty far along on the truing stand tonight. I'll post pictures once it's completed. The only piece I didn't find was the steel I need for the uprights. Menards wanted 8 bucks for 4 foot piece when I only need 6". I'll have to check my stash and if I can't find something suitable then I'll have to run down to the scrap yard for about $.95 worth of steel.
    A ways away from thoroughbred, but I'll get there!

  24. #24
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Upland Ca
    My Bikes
    Lemond Chambery/Cannondale R-900/Trek 8000 MTB/Burley Duet tandem
    Posts
    20,031
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jleiwig View Post
    But what if I mess with it myself Beanz? If I break a spoke then I replace it. No big deal right since I'm doing my own wrenching?
    .
    That's part of the reason I mention "if the wheels are failry straight, it's better to leave them alone at this stage". I'd leave them alone if they are, that way the shop and /or you don't break one..

    If you take them into a shop, they wil mess with them with more risk of breaking. Leave well enough alone is my point....."if they are fairly straight"
    Last edited by Mr. Beanz; 02-24-11 at 08:30 PM.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    245
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you a mechanically inclined, then DIY. Some people are not interested or mechanically inclined to do their own repairs.

    I do mine myself except if it takes a very expensive, specialized tool. Then I take it to the shop and have them do just that part.

    The wheels can be trued relatively easily but it takes patience and many people are not willing or able to be that patient. You can DIY truing very well and cheaply if you have a dial indicator handy. I use one and true the wheels on the bike. I can get within +/- 0.005" of true pretty quickly with some practice.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •