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  1. #1
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    Pedals........??????

    I am nearing the day I will be paying off my layaway and getting my bike.... now to turn my attention to pedals. I have never ever ridden clipless. I am looking at the Shimano 105 (with the big keo style cleat), Keo, and Forte Team from performance. Which is gonna be better overall for a 220lb guy? Money is an obstacle for me, which is why I am limited to this group listed. Any input?
    Beau

  2. #2
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    I'm not sure what type of pedals come standard on the bike you're buying (if it even comes with pedals). I use a nice platform pedal that allows me to use my everyday shoes. It worked fine for me last year (I did 10-20 mile rides with a long of 37) as I'm overwight and using this for weight loss. I'm thinking about getting some clipless this year however don't discount using something more basic to start off with.

    There are plenty of people that do not use clipless pedals and ride much farther distances then I do so don't let my limited ride distance indicate that you need clipless for more serious riding.

  3. #3
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    If you're looking at 105s then it is probably safe to bet you are looking at a road or touring bike. 105s are very nice pedals, I don't think you'll go wrong with them. Another pedal to take a look at would be anything from Speedplay. I'm using Speedplay Frogs and just love them! I also have a bad knee so the float offered by a frog is vital for me. If you're running a touring rig, go for a dual sided mountain bike pedal. The cleats are recessed into your shoe so you can get around off the bike without having to do the duck walk.

  4. #4
    Starting over CraigB's Avatar
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    Beau, it sounds like you've already decided on the clipless vs platform issue, and also which type of clipless system you want to use, namely the 3-bolt "delta" style Look-compatible kind.

    If that's all true, then I would venture to guess that at this price point, you're not likely to find much of any discernable difference among the three you mentioned. I'm not sure, but I think they're pretty similar in terms of features (tension adjustability, degree of float - if any, etc.). If it were me, I'd choose based on convenience of purchase (local vs mail order), who I wanted to support (local vs mail order) and maybe warranty.
    Craig in Indy

  5. #5
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    To answer your first question - None of them are better or worse for a 220 lb. guy like you. The only factor that may affect your choice is if you have had a history of knee or ankle problems. Your clydeness has no bearing on the decision of which pedal is best for you. Unless you are a weight weenie with a lot of money to burn and considering pedals with titanium spindles (they usually have a weight limit), which you are not.

    If you've had knee problems, then choose a pedal that has a fairly wide range of "float" - anything over 9 degrees is considered a lot. If you've had substantial knee problems, some Speedplay models go as high as 20 degrees of float. With Look Keos you alter the amount of float by mounting different colored cleats on the bottom of your shoes - 9 degrees (red), 4.5 degrees (gray), and 0 degrees (black) for those who want to be totally "locked in".

    If you've had ankle problems, then choose a pedal that has a lower "release tension". Some vendors, like Look, actually have this information handy as a listed specification for their products. A low number is going to be ~ 8Nm (that's Newton-meters) and will make for an easy release. While guys with big, strong, pedal strokes who race - like to be at ~15 Nm, which will require more force to release. Less expensive pedals (like Look Keo Easy) are hard-coded to the low end, to accommodate beginners and to keep costs down. More expensive pedals (like Look Keo Blades) are hard-coded to the high end, to accommodate experts and to keep the design simple and the weight down. Mid-priced ones (like Keo Max), are adjustable. I would strongly suggest that you get pedals that have adjustable release tension.

    Another thing to consider - if you have big wide feet, as many of us do, then pay attention to the size of the platform on the pedal. A pedal with larger platform/surface area will give you more stability and less "foot fatigue" on longer rides. This is also dependent on the stiffness of the soles of the shoes that you eventually pick out.

    The Fortes should be fine for you. They use Look cleats, but take note what type because some of the Fortes use the current Keo-style and some use the older Delta-style. Taking advantage of Look's cleats gives them the ability to vary float. I just looked at a couple on Performance's web site and it appears that most of the Forte road pedals have adjustable release tension too, even at the low end. And a couple of them are currently on sale at 50% off or better.
    Last edited by Kylerk; 03-02-11 at 09:12 AM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kylerk View Post
    If you've had knee problems, then choose a pedal that has a fairly wide range of "float" - anything over 9 degrees is considered a lot. If you've had substantial knee problems, some Speedplay models go as high as 20 degrees of float.
    I'm not convinced that more float is better. I used to think that I had knee problems and needed a pedal that had quite a bit of float. Turns out that what I really needed was a professional bike fit... and a different crank. After having the fit done and swapping to a "compact double" crank with a wide-range (11-28) cassette, my knees are perfectly happy with Shimano SPD pedals that have very little float. YMMV, of course.

    To the OP: I would strongly suggest that, as a clipless newbie, you consider Shimano's SPD mountain bike pedal system as opposed to the SPD-SL road pedal system. Benefits of SPD include: adjustable release tension, the ability to pedal the bike when not clipped in, 2-sided pedal entry, SH-56 "multi release" cleats (useful if you can't get the standard cleats to release consistently), and the ability to walk around when you're off the bike without the tendency to twist an ankle. As an entry-level pedal, the $35 Shimano M520 is a great choice. Combine them with a shoe that has a stiff sole and you're ready to ride!

  7. #7
    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
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    I've had the 105 SPD-SLs on my road bike for a while now and am a bit heavier than you. They are working great. I had some Look ARC compatibles for a while and they were terrible (much harder to exit and much rougher feel for almost the same money). That being said, there is a lot to be said for learning clipless with SPDs. There are road shoes that will take 2 bolt SPDs as well as 3 bolt SPD-SLs so you could start with SPDs and move to SPD-SLs without changing shoes. I've been purchasing my pedals at ProBikeKit. Here are the 105s:
    http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=P0050

    And here are the 520s:
    http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=NP07525

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CACycling View Post
    If you're in the U.S., JensonUSA has a better price on the M520. FYI, their back-order estimates on the M520 are pretty reliable, in my experience...

  9. #9
    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    If you're in the U.S., JensonUSA has a better price on the M520. FYI, their back-order estimates on the M520 are pretty reliable, in my experience...
    Depends on their shipping cost. PBK ships free and without tax anywhere in the US so the total prices will probably be about the same (unless you're ordering a bunch of stuff from Jenson).

  10. #10
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CACycling View Post
    Depends on their shipping cost. PBK ships free and without tax anywhere in the US so the total prices will probably be about the same (unless you're ordering a bunch of stuff from Jenson).
    Heck, last time I bought them, I walked into an LBS (3 mile drive) and picked them up for $50, no backorder, shipping etc and on the spot. I had them on the bike before Jenson or PBK could say "Booyah!"

    Somethings I don't mind paying a couple extra just to get them right then and there.

  11. #11
    Pedals, Paddles and Poles Daspydyr's Avatar
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    Check your local Craigs list as well. I have found some good buys on quality pedals for desperate prices. KrankBrothers Egg Beaters Ti1s for $35.
    I think its disgusting and terrible how people treat Lance Armstrong, especially after winning 7 Tour de France Titles while on drugs!

    I can't even find my bike when I'm on drugs. -Willie N.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CACycling View Post
    Depends on their shipping cost.
    I live in CA, so I'd pay shipping ($5.95) and tax. If I order from PBK, I'll get dinged by my credit card company for paying in a foreign currency. The end-price probably ends up being pretty close for me. For someone outside of CA, JensonUSA probably ends up being cheaper than PBK.

    PBK ships free and without tax anywhere in the US so the total prices will probably be about the same (unless you're ordering a bunch of stuff from Jenson).
    PBK is based in the United Kingdom. Why would I want to send my hard-earned money overseas, incur a currency conversion charge, have to wait weeks for stuff to arrive, and then deal with potential return/support/warranty headaches when I can order from a terrific American company and have my stuff in a day or two? Just to save $1-2? That seems pretty short-sighted...

  13. #13
    Nipples of Steel! AngelGendy's Avatar
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    I switched over my whole fleet of bikes to eggbeaters, I never paid more than $30 for any off craigslist. I put up a wanted ad and was flooded with responses, personally I prefer the chromoly C model.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by AngelGendy View Post
    I switched over my whole fleet of bikes to eggbeaters, I never paid more than $30 for any off craigslist. I put up a wanted ad and was flooded with responses, personally I prefer the chromoly C model.
    I think a clipless newbie might have trouble with the Eggbeater, due to the release angle. Your options are 15- or 20-degrees, as I recall. The release angle for Shimano SPDs is something like 6- or 8-degrees, IIRC. Eggbeaters shed mud much better than SPDs, but that likely isn't a concern for someone who is currently considering SPD-SL road pedals...

  15. #15
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    I live in CA, so I'd pay shipping ($5.95) and tax. If I order from PBK, I'll get dinged by my credit card company for paying in a foreign currency. The end-price probably ends up being pretty close for me. For someone outside of CA, JensonUSA probably ends up being cheaper than PBK.



    PBK is based in the United Kingdom. Why would I want to send my hard-earned money overseas, incur a currency conversion charge, have to wait weeks for stuff to arrive, and then deal with potential return/support/warranty headaches when I can order from a terrific American company and have my stuff in a day or two? Just to save $1-2? That seems pretty short-sighted...
    Gee, I say the same thing about US vendors.... The international marketers like PBK weren't set up for the US, they were set up for folks like me, I live in Canada, and even though the CA$ is worth more then a US$ now, and probably will be for the foreseeable future, I still see items on US websites for $49, and if I walk into the local store the same item is $99 (they used to blame it on currency values, and people would buy it when a CA$ cost US$0.67), now it's just gouging. For an item like a pedal, they are all made in China, Taiwan or Malaysia, with the possible exception of Campy, but who knows how long they will continue to manufacture in Europe.


    If they are shipping through the post office and I can get it cleared for $5 then it doesn't take a person with a doctorate in accounting to tell that it's going to work out lots cheaper.

  16. #16
    Senior Member JohnA42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    I think a clipless newbie might have trouble with the Eggbeater, due to the release angle.
    Word. My first attempt at clipless was with a pair of Candy pedals. (It's basically an eggbeater w/ a small platform.) Couldn't clip out to save my life. (Bad right knee.) They're sitting in a box in the garage somewhere. Like my Shimano pedals much better.

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    Best prices I've seen for Shimano pedals have consistently been at Ribble. Under $25 for M520s, and under $50 for 105s:

    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/mtb...ls/SHIMPEDM160
    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/roa...ls/SHIMPEDA845

    And yeah, it seems like I post those links about once a week.

  18. #18
    Randonneur in Training B.Alive's Avatar
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    I'm guessing I may be in the minority--but the extra cash for Speedplay's are SO WORTH IT!
    ---
    Ride on,
    Brad

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    My first bike tour could be this fall! Pittsburgh to DC October 2011???

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by achoo View Post
    Best prices I've seen for Shimano pedals have consistently been at Ribble. Under $25 for M520s, and under $50 for 105s:

    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/mtb...ls/SHIMPEDM160
    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/roa...ls/SHIMPEDA845
    Your numbers are a bit misleading... Shimano M520s at Ribble are $30.18, unless you order more than $56.46 worth of stuff and qualify for the additional discount. Shipping is $8.07 for a total of $38.25. If your bank charges you 3% for paying in a foreign currency, that's another $1.15 for a total of $39.40. Congrats: you saved $1.55 versus buying American!

  20. #20
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    I have used Dura Ace clipless and various SPD's. I prefer the SPD's just for the walk ability of them. I use them on my road bikes, touring bikes. I weigh about 230 lbs and haven't had a problem except the forte campus pedal that has a platform on one side and spd on the other, I have problems clipping in, it might be due to the large size of the pedal and I have problem finding the proper clipping point.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bustercrb/sets/72157623483647522/

  21. #21
    Senior Member Seve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by achoo View Post
    Best prices I've seen for Shimano pedals have consistently been at Ribble. Under $25 for M520s, and under $50 for 105s:

    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/mtb...ls/SHIMPEDM160
    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/roa...ls/SHIMPEDA845

    And yeah, it seems like I post those links about once a week.
    Yeah but they aren't American don't cha know.

  22. #22
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B.Alive View Post
    I'm guessing I may be in the minority--but the extra cash for Speedplay's are SO WORTH IT!
    I'm right there with you, B.Alive. I wouldn't trade my Frogs for anything! Heck, you can even rebuild them should a part fail.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    Your numbers are a bit misleading... Shimano M520s at Ribble are $30.18, unless you order more than $56.46 worth of stuff and qualify for the additional discount. Shipping is $8.07 for a total of $38.25. If your bank charges you 3% for paying in a foreign currency, that's another $1.15 for a total of $39.40. Congrats: you saved $1.55 versus buying American!
    1. Who orders online and ONLY gets a set of pedals? That $56 limit is real easy to reach.
    2. Who knew Shimano made pedals in the US?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by achoo View Post
    1. Who orders online and ONLY gets a set of pedals? That $56 limit is real easy to reach.
    2. Who knew Shimano made pedals in the US?
    1. Just trying to do an apples to apples comparison. Does that bother you?

    2. I don't care where Shimano makes pedals. The question is: given that you've decided they're the best and want to buy them, should you spend your money at home? Or send your money abroad so you can save a buck fifty? The later seems pretty stupid to me, especially given the potential wait times, possible return problems, customs issues, not to mention the credit card fraud problems suffered by both Ribble and PBK. If the price difference were bigger I might consider it, but for $1.50? No, thanks!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by B.Alive View Post
    I'm guessing I may be in the minority--but the extra cash for Speedplay's are SO WORTH IT!
    There are two of us now, stainless speedplay zeros ftw

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