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  1. #1
    Turgid Member TofuPowered's Avatar
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    Weight loss and tax money

    Ok. Haven't posted on BF in awhile and actually my first time in this part of the forum. I've essentially "let myself go" to a scale busting 285 pounds and it's now time to do something about it. I currently ride a Salsa Caseroll, which I love, but like a lot of others, I want something "flashier." I'm torn between purchasing a new bike (been thinking about either a ridley compact or ridley crosswind on competitive cyclist) or just upgrading my current bike. While I don't race, I've really wanted to try SRAM's doubletap for a while now. The two ridleys are 1299.00 and 1199.00 respectively. Both are made of aluminum with carbon forks.

    That's one route.

    The other route is to upgrade the snot out of my salsa. I was thinking about replacing the Tiagra/Sora group with SRAM Apex (supposedly the new hill killing group and boy do I LOVE hills..... ,) replacing the steel fork with a carbon one (weight savings and supposedly absorbs some of the road chatter,) and replacing my Salsa/Tiagra wheels which need truing at least once a month.

    I'm supposed to be getting a sizable sum back from uncle sam (around 2100$) so I could really go either way. I just need help deciding. Thanks in advance for any advice.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Have you ridden a SRAM-equipped bike? I happen to like it, but it isn't for everyone. Shifting is fast, but abrupt and there's quite a bit of noise. People used to the quiet, buttery, lethargic shifts of Shimano may find SRAM a bit too barbaric...

    If it were me, I'd probably upgrade the current bike unless there's some reason (ex: fit) that you need a different frame.

    If you're riding an aluminum fork, then you'll find carbon fiber to be a nice upgrade. If your current fork is steel, the chances that you'll notice a big difference by upgrading to carbon are slim... unless you can find one that's 2 pounds lighter. Be careful when buying: if you don't match the axle to crown race distance, you can really ruin the bike's handling. Don't ask me how I know this...

    If you've got Tiagra components now, think about switching to SRAM Rival if you want a true upgrade. The latest Rival components offer a mid-cage rear derailleur and 11-32 cassette, so they're just as hill-friendly as Apex.

    If you really want to get more out of your cycling, buy a new wheelset that includes a PowerTap rear hub and match it with a Garmin Edge computer... It'll do more for your fitness and weight-loss than a few flashy components.

  3. #3
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
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    I'm going to make some assumptions here that may not be correct here to illustrate a point. Let me assume that you're eating lunch from fast food places.Like I used to do. I'll assume you can save $20 a week by eating a low calorie meal prepared by yourself.Take that $2100 tax return and put it in a special savings account. Add the $20 dollars a week to it.

    Figure out what that bike is you really like to have. Lets say it's $6000. Let's also say you want to lose 60 lbs. For each lb you lose you have earned the right to spend $100 on that bike.

    This is the concept. Juggle the numbers around to fit your situation.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Dont buy an allum bike...PLEASE. Seriously though, I love steel and i really love the Casseroll. I am building to Vayas for me and my wife. I ride with ultegra brifters and cassette and a XT crank and couldn't be happier. I tried double tap and i am just not a fan. The new 105 group has the hidden cables and is suppose to be awfully nice.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    forgot to mention, If you have never ridden an allum road bike make sure you try it, and get some speed up. I am kind of sensitive to it but the buzz is no joke and it drives me crazy

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger531 View Post
    forgot to mention, If you have never ridden an allum road bike make sure you try it, and get some speed up. I am kind of sensitive to it but the buzz is no joke and it drives me crazy
    I'm also not a fan of aluminum. That said, adding a carbon fork to an aluminum frame smooths things out quite a bit. Wide tires also help. My touring bike has an aluminum frame and with 700x35 tires, it's as comfortable as anything I own.... except maybe the Schwinn Typhoon cruiser.

  7. #7
    Turgid Member TofuPowered's Avatar
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    sstorkel: No, I haven't ridden a sram bike yet. I have a bunch of friends that do (mostly little skinny racers, grrrr....) and they all love it. Being said, I don't like the way the current setup on my bike shifts, even after COMPLETELY dialing it in. It's still too slow. As you described, this is what sram and its doubletap is supposed to combat. As for upgrading the fork, you're probably right there. Further, it's relatively pointless to take pounds off a bike but not myself. As for the PT and garmin idea, I'm not trying to thumb my nose at that or you I just would find it funny to spend 1600+$ on a setup that I don't really need at this point. I ride so I lose weight, it seems relatively simple. The PT and garmin might help eventually, but that would be long after I'd already made my weight goals.

    Jethro: actually, I don't eat fast food, at all. If I have to eat out, it's typically Chinese food but that is not very often. I try to cook my own meals every day/night. Sometimes they may come out of the microwave, but at least I know what I'm eating and how it was prepared. Vegan paranoia is awesome!!!! Hehehehe. I do really like the idea of making myself earn the new bike though.

    Digger: I understand exactly what you mean. I love my salsa, I just hate the wheels and the components. I actually wanted the vaya but didn't have the extra few hundred dollars as compared to the deal on got on the casseroll. I have ridden some aluminum bikes and I noticed the buzz just on short parking lot jaunts. I thought it was just the frame itself being made of cheaper aluminum as compared to the more high end aluminum frames out there, or at least that's what I was hoping.

    Getting a decent set of wheels (http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com.../prod_161.html) and a rival group (around 800$) puts me right at the price of one of the Ridleys. I guess this would be a more appropriate choice to have illustrated: Should I spend just as much as a bike I'm lusting after just to change components and wheels? Either way, I can recoup some of the cost by selling the old parts or old bike. I think that I could make more off of selling the entire bike, but money isn't really the issue here. The issue is getting a bike that I can't wait to get outside and ride. Whichever option fits that idea more is the one I really want. That's more what I'm having trouble deciding. Thanx.
    Last edited by TofuPowered; 03-03-11 at 01:47 PM. Reason: clarity

  8. #8
    Turgid Member TofuPowered's Avatar
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    Forgot to mention: I also would like to reward myself as I "quit" smoking recently. I'm on my second week of using an electronic cigarette and so far, so good. I know that this isn't quitting per se, but at least I'm not damaging my lungs the way I was. I'm saving a ridiculous amount of money doing this as well (11$ for a week as opposed to 25-30$.) It's kind of a double edge sword though in that I'm now able to taste food again yet trying to lose weight. Hahaha. Ah health, you illusive b***h.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TofuPowered View Post
    sstorkel: No, I haven't ridden a sram bike yet. I have a bunch of friends that do (mostly little skinny racers, grrrr....) and they all love it. Being said, I don't like the way the current setup on my bike shifts, even after COMPLETELY dialing it in. It's still too slow. As you described, this is what sram and its doubletap is supposed to combat.
    Yep, SRAM is lightening fast! One of the reasons I love my Red-equipped bike...

    As for the PT and garmin idea, I'm not trying to thumb my nose at that or you I just would find it funny to spend 1600+$ on a setup that I don't really need at this point. I ride so I lose weight, it seems relatively simple. The PT and garmin might help eventually, but that would be long after I'd already made my weight goals.
    You'd be surprised at how helpful a power meter could be, I think. One of the immediate benefits I noticed was having an accurate estimate of the amount of calories I'd burned on a ride, as opposed to the wildly-inflated guesses coming out of my HRM or Garmin. Being able to see instantaneous power also helps me ride at a more consistent pace, as opposed to working hard for 5 minutes then loafing along for a while. Great for hill-climbing, too. Getting to the top of a long climb is mentally easier for me if I know that I can maintain my current power output all the way to the top. Ultimately, I find that riding with a power meter leads to much more effective work-outs...

    The issue is getting a bike that I can't wait to get outside and ride. Whichever option fits that idea more is the one I really want. That's more what I'm having trouble deciding.
    Sounds like this is a question that only you can answer...

  10. #10
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TofuPowered View Post
    Ok. Haven't posted on BF in awhile and actually my first time in this part of the forum. I've essentially "let myself go" to a scale busting 285 pounds and it's now time to do something about it. I currently ride a Salsa Caseroll, which I love, but like a lot of others, I want something "flashier." I'm torn between purchasing a new bike (been thinking about either a ridley compact or ridley crosswind on competitive cyclist) or just upgrading my current bike. While I don't race, I've really wanted to try SRAM's doubletap for a while now. The two ridleys are 1299.00 and 1199.00 respectively. Both are made of aluminum with carbon forks.

    That's one route.

    The other route is to upgrade the snot out of my salsa. I was thinking about replacing the Tiagra/Sora group with SRAM Apex (supposedly the new hill killing group and boy do I LOVE hills..... ,) replacing the steel fork with a carbon one (weight savings and supposedly absorbs some of the road chatter,) and replacing my Salsa/Tiagra wheels which need truing at least once a month.

    I'm supposed to be getting a sizable sum back from uncle sam (around 2100$) so I could really go either way. I just need help deciding. Thanks in advance for any advice.
    I would say, order yourself a set of wheels from a place like Peter White, where they know how to build a wheel for a 285lb guy, use the rest to pay off any debts that you might have hanging about, if you have no debts, then shove your money into a Euro or CA$ denominated investment fund and work on shaving weight off where it really counts, the engine. When the engine gets to 200lbs, then look at new bikes, providing you still have a job.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Seattle Forrest's Avatar
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    I would get the new bike, personally.

    Quote Originally Posted by TofuPowered View Post
    The other route is to upgrade the snot out of my salsa. I was thinking about replacing the Tiagra/Sora group with SRAM Apex (supposedly the new hill killing group and boy do I LOVE hills..... ,) replacing the steel fork with a carbon one (weight savings and supposedly absorbs some of the road chatter,) and replacing my Salsa/Tiagra wheels which need truing at least once a month.
    How will a different group help with hills? Is it pounds lighter? I'm hoping it's something other than just the gearing ... a hill-friendly cassette is a really cheap upgrade compared to a whole component group.

    Replacing a fork is no joke. The fork determines a lot of the bike's geometry, from how your weight is distributed, to how the bike steers.

    The frame has a lot of impact on all sorts of things, and even if you change half the bike out, you may or may not like the results. I don't have a Salsa, so I have no idea.
    Don't believe everything you think.

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