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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 03-05-11, 06:32 PM   #1
dkyser
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So went bike shopping today, was told to ride what I have.

Can you believe that, both LBS suggested the same thing, the bike I have is exactly what I need and until I am ready to move to a road bike should simply put some slicks on my Trek 8000.

I probably got great advice, am surprised since I would have been willing to spend $2000 - $2500 for the perfect bike, if there was such a thing.

I am not up on the gear, and clueless to wheels. The Trek shop said the wheels I have a double wall and very solid. They are the Bontrager Select Disc wheels.

This is the bike I have 2007 Trek 8000 I purchased it new July 2007 and probably have less than 10 miles on it. I was just too out of shape and probably should have chosen a cruiser instead of Mountain Bike.

Here are the specs, should any of the components be upgraded for a Clyde at 375 and dropping. The spoke count on the back is like 28, not even 32 but so far everyone I talk to says the double wall wheel is as good as you can get. Is this the case or are they just not used to building one for a clyde?

I will do some searches for saddles but there may be nothing better and will just take time for my back side to get used to it.

FRAMESET
Sizes 15.5, 17.5, 19.5, 21.5"
Frame ZR 9000 Alloy
Front Suspension RockShox Reba SL w/positive and negative air pressure, Motion Control, rebound, compression, lockout, 100mm
WHEELS
Wheels Bontrager Select
Tires Bontrager Jones ACX, 26x2.1", 60 tpi, folding
DRIVETRAIN
Shifters Shimano Deore LX Dual Control, 9 speed
Front Derailleur Shimano Deore LX
Rear Derailleur Shimano Deore XT
Crank Shimano Deore LX 44/32/22
Cassette SRAM PG970 11-34, 9 speed
Pedals Shimano 505, clipless
COMPONENTS
Saddle Bontrager Race
Seat Post Bontrager Race
Handlebars Bontrager Race, 0mm rise, 31.8mm
Stem Bontrager Race, 7 degree, 31.8mm
Headset Cane Creek S-3 w/cartridge bearings, sealed
Brakeset Shimano LX, hydraulic disc, 6" rotors
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Old 03-05-11, 07:03 PM   #2
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One issue is that if you're at 375 lbs, they may be reluctant to recommend any particular bike for you. A while back, I was looking through the Cannondale catalog, and they recommend maximum weights for their bikes, and if I remember right, that was around 275 for the average frame.

On the spoke issue, I'd probably ride it until something happens. Generally, that'll be spokes breaking and the wheel going out of true. When that happens, consider having a new wheel built with increased spoke count. If you overload a wheel, how it performs will partly depend on how it's used, and not just the weight that's put on it. So I generally don't ride a bike off curbs, try to avoid potholes, etc. When I first started riding, I had a $100 mountain bike, and the two times I took it off road, I tore up a rear wheel. You wouldn't think bouncing over a pasture at walking speed would be that hard on a wheel, but it was.

On saddles, there can be multiple issues. Part of it may be you geting used to the saddle. I've not had much trouble finding saddles I could be comfortable on, but some people have a major challenge to come up with one, so don't be afraid to try something different, either.
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Old 03-05-11, 07:26 PM   #3
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10 miles is not enough to say that a particular saddle
is not working for you. It's possible that your backside
is just not that used to riding and switching to another
might just get you the same results. My suggestion is
to ride more then see how you feel after awhile.
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Old 03-05-11, 11:14 PM   #4
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Of course it's different strokes for different folks, but I love my mountain bike I got when I first started riding again, and still ride it regularly. I have 1.75" street tires on it now, with fenders and a rack, but a mountain bike has great low gearing for starting out riding when you're out of shape. I'd have to agree with your lbs, you just need to ride what you have, try different small changes in the location and tilt of your saddle(search for info on where to start, how to find a good fit, etc.), and take it easy as you build up strength and endurance.
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Old 03-05-11, 11:48 PM   #5
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I thought the same thing in your previous post. Slicks! You mention the MTB not being efficient I can't figure that one out.

I have a TREK 8000 and ride it on the road at times with knobbies. I also have 28 spokes and surprised that the wheel stay tue after some of the beatings I put on them. But I am only 250 lbs. I did buy a back up set with 32 spokes just ready for the day these puppies go. But I bought my 8000 in 2006 and it hasn't happened yet.

You had $2000 to spend, buy a better back wheel, maybe something handbuilt, 36 spokes. Velocity Deep V does make a mountain bike version. I have Deep V road rims on my tandem supporting 400+ lbs.

Buy the rim and hub then have the shop build it.

I see mtb rims are available in Deep V (30 MM) and if not, the Fusion (25 mm)
http://www.algercyclery.com/veldeepvmoun.html
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Old 03-05-11, 11:52 PM   #6
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OP get on your bike and ride.
No up grades needed at this point.

Get some miles on the bike and your butt.
Your bike is 3 years old with just 10 miles on it.
Have fun.
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Old 03-06-11, 01:31 AM   #7
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28 spokes on a 26" wheel isn't bad. A 26" wheel is stronger anyway due to the shorter spokes.

I'm back at 375 after starting at ounces short of 400 and losing down to 355.
I've been riding for 4 or 5 years on 32 and 36 spoke count wheels (700c) and they have stood up pretty well. I recently have popped a few spokes and decided I need some wheels that I can be more confident with. I found some 48 spoke tandem touring wheels at Rocy Mountain Cyclery that I've had re-sized to 135mm and re-dished and re-tensioned. I'll be letting folks know how well they stand up to my beating them up after I can get some longer rides on them.

Get on and ride the wheels off whatever you get, then think about either repairing or replacing those wheels if needed.

Oh! And you probably don't want to stand when pedaling up hill...that's how I popped the spokes.
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Old 03-06-11, 02:03 AM   #8
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I use to ride my MTB with slicks all the times.. A nice tire to try is the Conti Sport Contact for 26: wheels.. I have used the 1.3 inch model with no issues, they are nice and fast tires..

http://www.biketiresdirect.com/produ...t-tire-26-inch
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Old 03-06-11, 02:21 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
OP get on your bike and ride.
No up grades needed at this point.

Get some miles on the bike and your butt.
Your bike is 3 years old with just 10 miles on it.
Have fun.
+1000!
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Old 03-06-11, 03:27 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
OP get on your bike and ride.
No up grades needed at this point.

Get some miles on the bike and your butt.
Your bike is 3 years old with just 10 miles on it.
Have fun.
+1000!
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Old 03-06-11, 06:32 AM   #11
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+1 to the above posts. It will take a while for you backside to get used to riding.
You just have to work through it.

Work on adjusting the fit of the bike or have someone fit you. Getting your bike fit right will help greatly.

If you still cannot make the saddle work for you after this, then maybe consider a new saddle.

Get slicks and work on you stamina if you want to get faster. You will have fast days and slow days. We all do.
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Old 03-06-11, 06:46 AM   #12
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Yep, +1 to above posts. I think it is great you have some LBS's that are straight with you rather than trying to squueze a buck out of you. Your bike is basically brand new, get out there and do some miles on it and give your butt a chance to get used to sitting on any kind of bike seat again.

Good luck, and happy trails!
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Old 03-06-11, 07:23 AM   #13
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Thanks everyone and I am taking the bike to the shop Monday to get slicks put on, or a less aggressive tire anyways.
I have been doing 60 minutes of cardio a day for the last 6 weeks so the hardest part will be getting my butt in shape.
I do not plan on doing anything but road riding for a while so going to try the wheel it has.
1 thing I did not like about the bike for road was the simplest fix in the world, Lock the front suspension. I honestly did not know that it had the lock out, this was the part I felt was not efficient. Seemed when I peddled hard the suspension took most of the energy, not the back wheel.

Just makes me mad, 6 years ago I was doing a lot of riding, and some pretty good trails too. Allowing myself to gain this weight was stupid and glad its coming back off.
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Old 03-06-11, 08:09 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkyser View Post
Can you believe that, both LBS suggested the same thing, the bike I have is exactly what I need and until I am ready to move to a road bike should simply put some slicks on my Trek 8000.

I probably got great advice, am surprised since I would have been willing to spend $2000 - $2500 for the perfect bike, if there was such a thing.

I am not up on the gear, and clueless to wheels. The Trek shop said the wheels I have a double wall and very solid. They are the Bontrager Select Disc wheels.

This is the bike I have 2007 Trek 8000 I purchased it new July 2007 and probably have less than 10 miles on it. I was just too out of shape and probably should have chosen a cruiser instead of Mountain Bike.

Here are the specs, should any of the components be upgraded for a Clyde at 375 and dropping. The spoke count on the back is like 28, not even 32 but so far everyone I talk to says the double wall wheel is as good as you can get. Is this the case or are they just not used to building one for a clyde?

I will do some searches for saddles but there may be nothing better and will just take time for my back side to get used to it.

FRAMESET
Sizes 15.5, 17.5, 19.5, 21.5"
Frame ZR 9000 Alloy
Front Suspension RockShox Reba SL w/positive and negative air pressure, Motion Control, rebound, compression, lockout, 100mm
WHEELS
Wheels Bontrager Select
Tires Bontrager Jones ACX, 26x2.1", 60 tpi, folding
DRIVETRAIN
Shifters Shimano Deore LX Dual Control, 9 speed
Front Derailleur Shimano Deore LX
Rear Derailleur Shimano Deore XT
Crank Shimano Deore LX 44/32/22
Cassette SRAM PG970 11-34, 9 speed
Pedals Shimano 505, clipless
COMPONENTS
Saddle Bontrager Race
Seat Post Bontrager Race
Handlebars Bontrager Race, 0mm rise, 31.8mm
Stem Bontrager Race, 7 degree, 31.8mm
Headset Cane Creek S-3 w/cartridge bearings, sealed
Brakeset Shimano LX, hydraulic disc, 6" rotors
Generally the best thing, if you have that bike with only 10 miles on it, your best bet, honestly is to put a set of slick tires on it, maybe 38-45mm ( 1.5 - 1.75") wide, engage the fork lockout, add a set of bar ends, and ride the wheels off it. Remember that the smaller the wheel, the more it can handle higher stress loads, so a 26" wheel (559MM) can take more force then a 700C wheel (622mm), smaller rim, with the high spoke count, will take a lot more before collapsing. You don't say where you are located, if there is a decent wheel guy near enough, then get the wheels properly trued and tensioned and don't worry about it.

As for saddles, Bontrager is Trek's house brand, it's used for parts that are commonly nondescript and which they buy by the container load from whichever Chinese jobber is selling cheap this period. The saddle is one of the first parts most people throw away, because it's a pain in the ***. Saddles are hard to shop for, because I have seen saddles that are comfortable for short distances and then feel like a sharp pointy stick at slightly longer distances. Saddles are a balancing act, you want it wide to handle the derriere, but you want it narrow to prevent chaffing. The key is the sit bones, find something that turns dark when it gets wet, like a cement stair, put on a bathing suit, and get wet, sit on it when wet, get up as quick as you can (get help if needed). Now look at the two dark spots, measure them centre to centre in millimetres, this is where the sit bones are. If your in the US possibly the only country in the world where rulers and tape measures are still all in inches, then measure in inches and multiply by 25.4, round up to the nearest millimetre. Add about 10 to your measurement, this is the narrowest saddle you can use, in order to prevent chaffing, you want to stay as close to this number as possible. It's too bad you can't rent saddles, because you could then test out a saddle for a minimal investment.
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Old 03-06-11, 09:36 AM   #15
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dkyser, Road tires and bar ends will make the bike much more attractive (make you want to ride it) for you at the moment. After you get about 50 hours on the present saddle you can make an honest assesment of what shape a replacement saddle needs to be, it's also possible the Bontranger may be just fine (I like Wogster's method).

Brad
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Old 03-06-11, 05:30 PM   #16
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Thanks again guys, great info I am super excited to get outside. I live in NW Pa and although some days the cardio room at the YMCA has nice scenery, most days it does not.
I want to get outside in the fresh air.

I am taking my bike to the Trek Dealer tomorrow to get it tuned up, slicks put on and will add some bar ends.
I am also going to start adding in some miles on my Schwinn Airdyne to get my back side ready for the actual bike.
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Old 03-06-11, 05:37 PM   #17
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Good choice. Sine the bike is basically still new, there still may be some cable stretch after you get it tuned up and ride for a few hundred kms, so be ready to do some minor cable tension adjustments.
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Old 03-07-11, 03:53 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1nterceptor View Post
10 miles is not enough to say that a particular saddle
is not working for you. It's possible that your backside
is just not that used to riding and switching to another
might just get you the same results. My suggestion is
to ride more then see how you feel after awhile.
^^^^ Wise Advice!^^^^^^^
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Old 03-07-11, 01:23 PM   #19
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+1 to all above.

Put 1,000 miles on the current bike before you even think about a new bike. Then when you get a road bike keep the current one for a rain/winter bike, or as a backup bike in case your new one breaks down.
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Old 03-07-11, 02:14 PM   #20
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Locking the front fork and putting on some slicks will help a bunch!

I'm speaking from experience. All of my buddies have road bikes - I have a MTB. The first 8-10 rides sucked. Then, I bought some slicks - went from wide, knobby tires with about 30psi to slick, thin tires with about 85psi. WOW! What a difference in rolling resistance!

Once I hit the 260lbs mark or ride 40 consecutive miles (which ever comes first) I'm gonna buy a road bike.
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Old 03-07-11, 02:26 PM   #21
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Don’t do like a lot of new Clyde’s like I did. The saddle will be uncomfortable for a while until you and the saddle break in. after the first time or two riding I went and bought a nice cushiony pad to put on my saddle and some nice gel bibs. Sounds good but all that padding bunches up in places we don’t need anything bunching up. The best thing I did was purchasing a stiffer saddle (Brooks) and wear my bibs. I can now ride 60 plus miles before I really start squirming around.

Good luck and keep riding.
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Old 03-07-11, 04:04 PM   #22
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Thanks everyone, I am going to do exactly what you guys are suggesting. I went today and dropped off the bike to have bar extensions, less aggresive tires and a tune up. I looked at the road bikes and said that is my goal, but when the time is right. When I start riding long enough rides, then I will get a road bike and keep my MTB for the crappy weather or for a change of pace.
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