Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Am I too heavy for my bike?

    Apologies if this is in the wrong place.


    I'm 300lb's or so. I've decided to try cycling to drop some weight and I've bought a used GT Avalanche 1.0 from 2001. It was dirt cheap (or so I thought) but came without a chain. A friend fitted a new one for me and I took it out for my first ride today. When pedalling, the chain (I think) seemed to click and slip a cog or two and I'd feel a bit of a jerk.

    Am I too fat for this dodgy old bike? Can it be fixed with adjustments or does it need money spending on a new cassette and chainrings? I have tried to research a bit, but to be honest I'm feeling quite overwhelmed. I haven't ridden a bike in 20 years, lol.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    245
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You are probably not too heavy for the bike. I am 300 lbs also and rarely experienced chain slip. The only times I experienced it was on very steep grades and I was shifting poorly. It is probably an adjustment or wear issue.

    Can you explain when and how it slips? From you initial description, it sounds like an out of adjustment derailleur. Did your friend do any tuning or adjustment to the derailleurs after installing the chain?
    Old steel makes me squeal!

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think he just made sure the chain was the right length and gave it a ten yard test to see if it seemed okay.

    It's hard to describe when it happens, but it was very frequent and I can only describe it as feeling too heavy for the pedals and it not feeling secure.

    Also, I have no clue if the cassette and chainrings etc have ever been changed, I know the bike has been ridden quite a lot though, the handgrips were worn away to almost nothing.

    (the 300lb is probably quite a conservative estimate too)

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    245
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you have a local bike shop nearby that can check it out for a reasonable price, they can check for wear and adjust the derailleurs. A basic tune up may be a good investment since the bike is new to you.
    Old steel makes me squeal!

  5. #5
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mattoon,Ill
    My Bikes
    Trek 7300 Giant Sedona E-Bike Trek Madone 4.5 Surly Cross Check
    Posts
    1,977
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You're welcome to ask almost anything here. We may not have the answers but we're a pretty mellow group.I'm pretty mechanical so you may need to say slow down I don't understand.

    First thing is to get some chain lube made for bicycles. Flip bicycle upside down so it rests on seat and handlebars.Spin the crank and shift the rear gears. Notice the cable going to the rear shifter. Try to get chain lube into every place it rubs against something.It doesn't need alot, one or two drops in each spot. Try to identify where it's slipping and post your findings. Don't adjust anything yet. just spend some thing looking at how it works. Spend a good 20 minutes just looking at the geartrain.

  6. #6
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    My Bikes
    '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2009 Spesh Singlecross, 2011 RM Flow1
    Posts
    11,322
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Old cassette (and/or chainrings) + new chain == skipping

    The teeth on the cassette and rings get worn to the fit of the previous chain, which I'm guessing was on there the life of the bike. Spend a few extra bucks on a new cassette and you'll more than likely fix the issue.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  7. #7
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Camp Hill, Pennsyltucky
    My Bikes
    07 Raliegh Grand Sport 98ish Mongoose Manuever
    Posts
    2,099
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
    Old cassette (and/or chainrings) + new chain == skipping

    The teeth on the cassette and rings get worn to the fit of the previous chain, which I'm guessing was on there the life of the bike. Spend a few extra bucks on a new cassette and you'll more than likely fix the issue.
    +1.

    The casset might be worn. The good news is that cassettes arn't very expensive. The derailleur could also be out of adjustment...or your friend might have put the wrong kind of chain on it. Like a 9 speed chain on a 7 speed cassette. Take your bike to a bike shop and have a mechanic look it over, it would be a good idea to get it tuned up. While you're there, pick up a new set of grips. This will increase your comfort and get a bit of a relationship established with the bike shop.

  8. #8
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the replies. It's definitely the right chain, it's a 9 speed SRAM chain, I checked via google and also asked the chap in Halfords (chainstore retailer who have a load of allegedly trained mechanics in their shops).

    I will try and see if it does it upside-down, and oil it, but it felt like it was the kind of jerk that was occurring only when my full weight went onto the pedal type deal. If I have to buy new cassette and chainrings it'll have cost more than buying the bike itself! Ah well, I think I got a bargain anyway, and if I can get it running smoothly it'll last a while until I save up enough cash for a Kona Hoss or similar.

  9. #9
    Downtown Spanky Brown bautieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Camp Hill, Pennsyltucky
    My Bikes
    07 Raliegh Grand Sport 98ish Mongoose Manuever
    Posts
    2,099
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fredbloggs View Post
    Thanks for the replies. It's definitely the right chain, it's a 9 speed SRAM chain, I checked via google and also asked the chap in Halfords (chainstore retailer who have a load of allegedly trained mechanics in their shops).

    I will try and see if it does it upside-down, and oil it, but it felt like it was the kind of jerk that was occurring only when my full weight went onto the pedal type deal. If I have to buy new cassette and chainrings it'll have cost more than buying the bike itself! Ah well, I think I got a bargain anyway, and if I can get it running smoothly it'll last a while until I save up enough cash for a Kona Hoss or similar.
    It's worth a shot to try this before you get upset with your purchase:

    At the end of the cable that feeds into your rear derailure there will be a little barrel adjuster. Tighten that barrel a half a turn and try riding again. Doing this will pull a tiny bit of slack out of the cable, cables stretch over time and with use. If you suspect the bike has see a ton of miles, this is a likely suspect. If the chain is still jumpy after your half turn, give it another half turn. If that doesn't help any then my finger is pointed at the cassette. These can be purchased for about 30 dollars and installed for a few bucks more.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
    My Bikes
    Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
    Posts
    6,944
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fredbloggs View Post
    Apologies if this is in the wrong place.


    I'm 300lb's or so. I've decided to try cycling to drop some weight and I've bought a used GT Avalanche 1.0 from 2001. It was dirt cheap (or so I thought) but came without a chain. A friend fitted a new one for me and I took it out for my first ride today. When pedalling, the chain (I think) seemed to click and slip a cog or two and I'd feel a bit of a jerk.

    Am I too fat for this dodgy old bike? Can it be fixed with adjustments or does it need money spending on a new cassette and chainrings? I have tried to research a bit, but to be honest I'm feeling quite overwhelmed. I haven't ridden a bike in 20 years, lol.
    There are 3 reasons for a new chain to skip, poor adjustment, a worn cassette/freewheel or a bent hanger.

    First is make sure the derailleur is properly adjusted, if it skips on only the inner or outer, and rattles a lot of the time, or it's fine on the inner and outer, but skips on the inside ones, and rattles all the time, then it's the cable barrel adjuster that needs tweaking.

    Second, shift into the middle most gear, look from behind do the two jockey wheels line up with the cogs, they should line up exactly, you can use a straight edge as a visual guide, if not, the derailleur hanger is bent, for aluminum or carbon frames it needs to be replaced, steel frames can be bent back, but need special tools to do it properly, Ti frames I can't say.

    If neither of those fix it, it's probably one or two worn cogs, so you need to replace the cassette/freewheel, it's not an expensive repair.

  11. #11
    Come here often? <wink> exile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    My Bikes
    2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker, 1999 Jamis Exile
    Posts
    2,846
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just go to a LBS and let them know what the problem is. It sounds like the bike could have multiple issues or simply be a quick fix.
    lil brown bat wrote:
    Wow, aren't other people stupid? It's a good thing that we're so smart. Yay us.

  12. #12
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,987
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fredbloggs View Post
    Thanks for the replies. It's definitely the right chain, it's a 9 speed SRAM chain, I checked via google and also asked the chap in Halfords (chainstore retailer who have a load of allegedly trained mechanics in their shops).
    If it's a 9-speed chain on a 9-speed cassette it won't be the chain being mismatched to the cassette. If you took it to Halfords I guess you must be in the UK so talk of everything in dollars isn't necessarily helpful to you! I've never used Halfords but I'd expect them to be much like Evans where it seems some staff know everything you could possibly want to know and others know nothing and care even less.

    A cassette alone can be pretty cheap - IIRC you can get them from places like chainreactioncycles for 30 or less. Then you'd need to fit it, which is where getting to know your local bike shop can be useful. You might pay a little more for the cassette from them but hopefully they'll fit it for you for only a modest extra charge. If you feel like getting into the mechanics of it all you could get yourself the right tools to do it, on the basis you're working with a cheap bike. The bike shop can also (hopefully) help diagnose the problem and advise you just what you need to fix it.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Toronto (again) Ontario, Canada
    My Bikes
    Norco Bushpilot (out of commission), Raleigh Delta
    Posts
    6,944
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fredbloggs View Post
    Thanks for the replies. It's definitely the right chain, it's a 9 speed SRAM chain, I checked via google and also asked the chap in Halfords (chainstore retailer who have a load of allegedly trained mechanics in their shops).

    I will try and see if it does it upside-down, and oil it, but it felt like it was the kind of jerk that was occurring only when my full weight went onto the pedal type deal. If I have to buy new cassette and chainrings it'll have cost more than buying the bike itself! Ah well, I think I got a bargain anyway, and if I can get it running smoothly it'll last a while until I save up enough cash for a Kona Hoss or similar.
    Chain rings, usually last quite a while, cassettes may not, chains wear over time, dirt and grit gets into the bushings and then acts like a grinding paste in there. If your chain gets black, it needs to be cleaned and lubricated. There are more methods to clean chains then there are models of bicycles, from the wipe it down and oil it crowd, to boiling it in degreaser and then wax. Personally, I tend to use economical chains, take a rag, spray some degreaser on the rag, spin it backwards a few times, let it dry, measure for stretch and then apply fresh chain lube. One thing to remember, apply lube to the joints in the chain only, one drop each, let it sit for a few minutes, then wipe it off, this will remove any excess and keep it cleaner. When the chain has stretched, so that 12 links are more then 12 1/16th inches, replace it, the cogs will last a lot longer if you do. Even so, wearing out a set of cogs, when maintaining the chain and replacing it at the proper interval, is a good problem to have, it means your riding a lot.

  14. #14
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,100
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    9 speed casettes aer cheap. here in the states, a 9speed chain can be had for $20 and a 9 speed casette can be had for about $30. It's probably a worthwhile investment. I also agree with everyone else, take the bike to a shop and let them do a more thorough complete tuneup of the whole bike. it may very well cost you a lot more than what you paid for the bike but that doesn't mean it's not worth it. it could be a perfectly functioning bike that just needs bearings regreased, deraileurs adjusted and perhaps a new cable or housing here and there, all relatively cheap stuff. the only other concern is whether or not the wheels are in good enough shape to hold up under your weight

    good luck!

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    88
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You are fine to ride this bike. I'm 350 pounds and have the same bike as you. As others have said its most likly a worn cassette. The only problem I've had that was weight indust was I've pop a couple of spooks.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •