Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-08-11, 04:00 AM   #76
laxpatrick
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have one of th Cannondale caad's in 66 cm... Great bike. Just find a good shop that'll set it up for you. Big Ring in Golden, CO did a great price for me and somehow found 180mm Dura Ace cranks for my Ultegra bike...

Last edited by laxpatrick; 12-08-11 at 04:01 AM. Reason: Omitted text
laxpatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-11, 08:35 PM   #77
EGUNWT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kansas City, MO
Bikes: Surly. 4 of them.
Posts: 195
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Surly's got the Long Haul Trucker, both disc and canti models, in 64cm this year. Their bikes tend to run a little big, so you should be in great shape on that.

They've also got the Ogre, their 29er MTB, in 24", which is pretty much the same kinda size but in MTB land.
EGUNWT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-11, 09:22 PM   #78
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
Posts: 3,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LemondFanForeve View Post
Ebay is a good source for large shoes...I, too, wear a size 16, so I know what you're going through there. I have seen used pairs, and some for cheaper on fleabay, just all timing I guess. Thanks for the heads up on the bike...Ill check it out
I just saw on the Trek website that a whole bunch of the 1. and 2. series have the 64 cm size. And that is a sloping top tube 64 so should fit pretty big.
LarDasse74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-11, 10:14 PM   #79
Shimagnolo
Senior Member
 
Shimagnolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Zang's Spur, CO
Bikes:
Posts: 7,569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 170 Post(s)
KHS / Zinn: http://www.khsbicycles.com/05_flite_747_11.htm
Shimagnolo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-11, 10:35 PM   #80
jimblairo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Bikes: Litespeed Ultimate 2006, Litespeed Pisgah , Specialized Roubaix 2008, Trek Madone 2011
Posts: 946
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I'm 6'6" also but that does not mean that we would both have a good fit on say a 64 cm. I have very long femeurs and I use a set back post on a 64cm to get a knee over pedal position and I use a 100 stem. My stand over is 99cm.

I have a 64 Specialized Roubaix, a 64 Trek Madone Project 1 and a 63 Litespeed Ultimate. They are set up with the same top of saddle to BB center, nose of saddle to center of headset and top of bars to center of front drop out. However, the 3 bikes ride very differently.

The best thing is to find someone with a fit machine.
jimblairo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-11, 06:10 AM   #81
Hendricks97
Senior Member
 
Hendricks97's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Bikes: All City Nature Boy, Salsa Ti Fargo, Kona Electric Ute
Posts: 312
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Im 6'4" and Im fairly stretched out on a 60cm Felt F75 and I know they go up to 62
Hendricks97 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-12, 04:51 PM   #82
davidfrench
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi, maybe a little late in that conversation but there's SOMA.
I have a 66cm Smoothie ES. I'm 6f6 and it's not bad, not ideal, but I think the only new frame solution if you really need a brand new frame.
I bought a 68 (c-to-c) Bill Davidson used and if the size is right the geometry is not good for me. Both bikes are for sale.
I'm looking towards a Rivendell (who has a 68cm frame Bombadill)... One can dream!
:-)
davidfrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-14, 10:36 AM   #83
rootes1
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sorry to restart an old thread, i'm. 6'6" and find my 62cm Cannondale fine, mainly as it is a true 62cm rather than say the biggest specialized which is badged as 61 but seat tube centre to top is only 58cm..

Also for the even bigger gent, German brand Canyon offer a 3XL size in all their road bikes which is a badged as 65cm and is 63.5cm centre to top

https://www.canyon.com/_en/roadbikes...94#tab-reiter2
rootes1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-14, 01:19 PM   #84
bransom
Senior Member
 
bransom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: St. Louis area
Bikes:
Posts: 365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I just rode with a friend who is 6' 6" and is happy on his 63 cm Cannondale.
bransom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-14, 07:40 AM   #85
pavemen
Senior Member
 
pavemen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: California
Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 2.0
Posts: 112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Since this thread was revived, I will throw in I am just shy of 6'4" and my 60cm works well for me.
pavemen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-14, 08:50 PM   #86
brawlo
Senior Member
 
brawlo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Australia
Bikes:
Posts: 598
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Revived, so I thought I might point some at this Tall guy stock frames little coming together of bikes that run large.

Height/frame size are so subjective. With such different proportions for people and so many different ways for manufacturers to brand frame size, the numbers are next to useless.
brawlo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-14, 10:20 PM   #87
elcruxio
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro
Posts: 1,421
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
6'5" and riding a 61. The number of the frame size usually means the seattube, which of course nowdays is pretty useless. My maximum top tube length for a 120mm stem is 600mm with a 72.5 seat angle so not that long.

Currently my bike's top tube is 587mm with a 130mm stem and I have still room to drop the stem and make it longer. Proportions are so individual that looking for numbers is senseless
elcruxio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-14, 11:44 PM   #88
brawlo
Senior Member
 
brawlo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Australia
Bikes:
Posts: 598
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by elcruxio View Post
6'5" and riding a 61. The number of the frame size usually means the seattube, which of course nowdays is pretty useless. My maximum top tube length for a 120mm stem is 600mm with a 72.5 seat angle so not that long.

Currently my bike's top tube is 587mm with a 130mm stem and I have still room to drop the stem and make it longer. Proportions are so individual that looking for numbers is senseless
Yes, most still use seat tube measurements, but a lot don't and that can just make the issue more confusing.

I think that once you are "in the game" and have a fit worked out, the figures that become most relevant are stack and reach. Basically you will have a saddle setback distance from the bottom bracket that suits you. From there you will have a distance from the saddle to the handlebars. This is where reach becomes important in working out what size frame fits you, and even more importantly, or at least I think so as a 6'5"er, whether a bike frame will fit you at all. You will then have your handlebars at a certain height in relation to the BB and that is where stack comes in.

I am a racer, and so my fit is longer and lower than most. I ride with a 120mm stem and 605mm effective top tube frame. There aren't many options around that will fit me. Some are around but not available here in Oz.
brawlo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-14, 11:49 PM   #89
elcruxio
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro
Posts: 1,421
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by brawlo View Post
Yes, most still use seat tube measurements, but a lot don't and that can just make the issue more confusing.

I think that once you are "in the game" and have a fit worked out, the figures that become most relevant are stack and reach. Basically you will have a saddle setback distance from the bottom bracket that suits you. From there you will have a distance from the saddle to the handlebars. This is where reach becomes important in working out what size frame fits you, and even more importantly, or at least I think so as a 6'5"er, whether a bike frame will fit you at all. You will then have your handlebars at a certain height in relation to the BB and that is where stack comes in.

I am a racer, and so my fit is longer and lower than most. I ride with a 120mm stem and 605mm effective top tube frame. There aren't many options around that will fit me. Some are around but not available here in Oz.
High end bikes that have top tubes over 605mm are rare that is true, but for example specialized bikes have pretty decent amount of reach in even their top of the line models. And you can use a 130mm or even 140mm stem. I prefer the 130 as I feel it gives me better weight distribution (since I have a lot of setback)
elcruxio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-14, 12:00 PM   #90
HunkerDown
Senior Member
 
HunkerDown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA
Bikes: Pinarello Dogma 65.1 Think 2
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Last month I found a used 2013 Pinarello Dogma 62cm frame on eBay. Checked the geometry versus the 64cm Roubaix and couldn't believe my eyes.

Top Tube Pinarello/Specialized: 620/615
Reach Pinarello/Specialized: 410/409
Stack Pinarello/Specialized: 651/656

Made an offer at what I could (barely) afford and now I own it. The bike is now at my LBS getting built up with a combination of Dura-Ace and Ultegra DI2 components and custom clyde climbing wheels with HED rims and Dura-Ace hubs. Supposed to be finished today. Oh, the waiting...

HD
HunkerDown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-14, 05:18 PM   #91
brawlo
Senior Member
 
brawlo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Australia
Bikes:
Posts: 598
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Yeah, just as I was about to pull the trigger on my Felt, my LBS ordered one of those Dogma 62cm bikes in. Very nice in the flesh but was just a bit out of my price range. But now with a proper bike fit under my belt, I would still need a 130mm stem to suit my position. For all the top tube length, the reach on the Dogma is still 9mm shorter than my Felt with a 605 TT
brawlo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-14, 06:10 PM   #92
TheNeed4Speed
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 35
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
Hate to ask a stupid question, or sound condescending, but: have you tried riding a 62cm bike recently?

The trend toward sloping top tubes and so-called "compact" frame geometries means that you can often get by with a slightly smaller frame. When I started riding, my first road bike had a horizontal top tube and was labeled as being 56cm. Fit perfect! These days, I ride a 54cm frame with a sloping top tube. It's also a perfect fit.


I wouldn't pay attention to the number painted on the frame by the manufacturer as much as I would to the actual fit. In particular, the length of the top tube seems to have more to do with achieving an acceptable fit than the length of the seat tube (which often corresponds to the frame "size"). I found the fit calculator over at Competitive Cyclist to be pretty accurate. I went with the middle-of-the-road "Eddy" fit, FWIW.

If you haven't tried to fit yourself to a "compact" frame, I'd suggest giving the fit calculator a try. Plug in some numbers, see what it comes up with, then compare its suggestions to the geometries of various frames. If the geometry is anywhere close to correct, it might be worth taking a look at the bike. You can always tweak the fit by installing a longer stem, a seatpost with greater setback, handlebars with more reach, etc.
Yep, I agree. I'm 6'9" and absolutely love my Bianchi via Nirone 7 63cm. I put on an angled-up stem and I have room to spare on it. When I was shopping for bikes I shared your concern and was very close to settling for an incorrect fit and making it work. Then I went into one of my LBS and they have this box you step into with laser pointers and shyt and it's hooked into a computer. Measures out everything and determines what bike frame you need and how it should be adjusted.
TheNeed4Speed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 06:02 PM   #93
HunkerDown
Senior Member
 
HunkerDown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA
Bikes: Pinarello Dogma 65.1 Think 2
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My 62cm Pinarello Big Dog(ma):
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 003 small.jpg (96.4 KB, 27 views)
HunkerDown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 07:24 PM   #94
Vexxer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Fuquay Varina, NC (Research Triangle)
Bikes: 2016 Fuji Gran Fondo 2.0 LE, Specialized Tricross Elite Disc (2013), Motobecane 529HT
Posts: 269
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
I know road bikes are sized differently, but Giant's XL sized hybrids and MB's fit me perfectly at 6'5... I can't believe that they would not also have road bikes in my size.
Vexxer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-14, 10:38 PM   #95
bigfred 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NZ
Bikes: More than 1, but, less than S-1
Posts: 3,835
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HunkerDown View Post
My 62cm Pinarello Big Dog(ma):
Have fun with that one! Now, if manufacturers would only raise the bottom brackets on the truely large frames to allow for proportional cranks:-)
__________________
Birth Certificate, Passport, Marriage License Driver's License and Residency Permit all say I'm a Fred. I guess there's no denying it.
bigfred is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-14, 06:36 AM   #96
Shimagnolo
Senior Member
 
Shimagnolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Zang's Spur, CO
Bikes:
Posts: 7,569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 170 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
Have fun with that one! Now, if manufacturers would only raise the bottom brackets on the truely large frames to allow for proportional cranks:-)
Cyclocross frames typically have the BB higher than the equivalent road frame.
Shimagnolo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-14, 11:31 PM   #97
brawlo
Senior Member
 
brawlo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Australia
Bikes:
Posts: 598
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HunkerDown View Post
My 62cm Pinarello Big Dog(ma):
The BIGgest advantage to the Dogma is the length of the steerer tube. It's one of the very very few big frames that has a decent length steerer and head tube long enough to get your head/shoulders up. Most big framed bikes are built around the production forks that rarely come with a steerer tube longer than 300mm, let alone a head tube long enough to accomodate a higher handlebar position (usually the stem can't be any higher than 40mm from the top bearing). I think Specialized also have a longer head tube and fork steerer on the big roubaix. The Dogma's head tube is a full 55mm longer than my Felt F4 which has a longer reach frame.
brawlo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-14, 12:15 AM   #98
bigfred 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: NZ
Bikes: More than 1, but, less than S-1
Posts: 3,835
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shimagnolo View Post
Cyclocross frames typically have the BB higher than the equivalent road frame.
Yes. However, they're usually only a few millimeters higher and not the 20 or so that is required for 190-220mm cranks. Also, CX frames tend to have slightly shorter top tubes or reach. Ideally BB drop for long cranks would only be about 50mm vs the 65-70mm on most road frames.

Anyhow, there's also the steerer tube conundrum that brawlo brings up. Most manufacturers don't use steerers longer than 300mm. Subsequently, 40mm of stem stack plus the maximum of 40mm of spacers above the bearing means that there's no reason to have headtubes in excess of 220mm. Which limits the stack height available to us clydes in most cases. It would be equally great if manufacturers of truly large frames also started using 350mm steerers, with head tubes of a length that would allow more stack height.
__________________
Birth Certificate, Passport, Marriage License Driver's License and Residency Permit all say I'm a Fred. I guess there's no denying it.
bigfred is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-14, 10:00 PM   #99
davidfrench
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A bit more than 2 years after my last reply in this thread and I can now tell you my solution:
Tall Guy ? Big Wheel | Bicycles for tall people
You don't have to believe me, because, you will have to ride it to understand and feel what it is to ride a bike that is made from the ground up for riders taller than 6'6".
If you want, I'm in San Francisco.
davidfrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-14, 10:27 PM   #100
H.S.Clydesdale
Senior Member
 
H.S.Clydesdale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Lakewood, CO
Bikes: 2013 KHS 747 (by Lennard Zinn), 1987 Nishiki Sport, 1983 Sanwa 700
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


I am 6'7" and love my 747. I would say I had not actually felt what it was like to ride a bike until proportional cranks. And the geometry of the 747 takes best advantage of the larger cranks. (I had them on an old eighties 66cm frame before the 747). I Do wish I could have some proportional wheels as well. Looking forward to the road version of the dirty-sixer.

My 747 (a 2013 version, when XXL was the only size) is actually a bit large for me. I have slammed the stem and changed it to a 90mm (after taking this picture). I also did not require a longer-than-stock seat tube as many others have reported. My height is mainly in my neck, I think I have the arms/legs/torso of a 6'5". But also, when using proportional cranks you dont need such a large bike. My old 66cm fit well, then I switched to 200mm cranks and it was just a hair too big.
H.S.Clydesdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:57 PM.